Into the Driver's Seat
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Using Technology to Raise Cultural Awareness

Using Technology to Raise Cultural Awareness | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

I am from the UK, but I live and work in Curitiba in the south of Brazil. I have found that students are often very interested in how things are done in different countries...

 

This means that cultural awareness was a part of my teaching long before the current obsession with doing everything with technology. I am a firm believer in using technolgoy when it offers something different and there is a strong pedagogigcal case for doing so. All too often people use the latest high-tech gizmo just for the sake of using it.

 

However, technology has opened up certain ways of raising cultural awareness that perhaps weren't there before."

 

Using YouTube, Twitter, and WebQuests -JL

 


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Into the Driver's Seat
Building the independence of learners through thoughtful uses of technology
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A mathematician has created a teaching method that’s proving there’s no such thing as a bad math student

A mathematician has created a teaching method that’s proving there’s no such thing as a bad math student | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it
John Mighton, a Canadian playwright, author, and math tutor who struggled with math himself, has designed a teaching program that has some of the worst-performing math students performing well and actually enjoying math. There’s mounting evidence that the method works for all kids of all abilities.
His program, JUMP (Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies) Math, is being used by 15,000 kids in eight US states (it is aligned with the Common Core), more than 150,000 in Canada, and about 12,000 in Spain. The US Department of Education found it promising enough to give a $2.75 million grant in 2012 to Tracy Solomon and Rosemary Tannock, cognitive scientists at the Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, to conduct a randomized control trial with 1,100 kids and 40 classrooms. The results, out later this year, hope to confirm previous work the two did in 2010, which showed that students from 18 classrooms using JUMP progressed twice as fast on a number of standardized math tests as those receiving standard instruction in 11 other classrooms.
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