Into the Driver's Seat
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Into the Driver's Seat
Building the independence of learners through thoughtful uses of technology
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Internal Migration in Mexico

Internal Migration in Mexico | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it
Mexico’s cities are ballooning in population while rural and indigenous communities, where there are still over 60 indigenous languages other than Spanish spoken, are disappearing. For many indigenous families, illiteracy and the powerful forces of racism and discrimination can often offset the lures that brought them to migrate to urban centers.


The northern border with the United States is not the only destination for Mexican migrants. For millions, the bustling cities, which offer hopes of better jobs and education lure many from their traditional rural, and often indigenous communities. What they find in the cities is a mix of hope and hardship.


TagsMexico, indigenous, economic, development, migration.


Via Seth Dixon, Jim Lerman
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Landon Conner's curator insight, November 3, 2015 8:51 PM

Many of these Mexicans go through tough times moving from place to place and job to job. Many that lived in rural areas are now in more civilized metro areas with more people and technology. I great deal of Mexicans move and are adapting to these new environments with cause problems and hardships in the process. LDC

London Kassab's curator insight, November 3, 2015 9:35 PM

Mexico is having a lot of internal migration within cities. Many different languages are disappearing and for a lot of the people literacy, racism, and other forces can often bring them to urban areas. Also the border isn't the only hope for migrants, bustling cities offer hopes of better lifestyle as well.    L.K.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 16, 2015 11:14 AM

I believe migrants should be allowed to migrate to their destination. But there should of course be policies as to how many people come to one area at a time and such. In my opinion the main problem lies with those who exploit the border and migrate illegally as well as those who don't belong such as terrorists. Once this is resolved migration from Mexico to the United States or to anywhere will be much smoother. CN

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The Magic of Metaphor: What Children’s Minds Teach Us about the Evolution of the Imagination ~ Brain Pickings

The Magic of Metaphor: What Children’s Minds Teach Us about the Evolution of the Imagination ~ Brain Pickings | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

by Maria Popova

 

"To trace the development of double function terms in children, Asch and Nerlove presented groups of kids with a collection of different objects — ice water, sugar cubes, powder puffs — and asked them to identify the ones that were cold, sweet, or soft. This, of course, they were easily able to do.

 

"Asch and Nerlove then asked the children, Can a person be cold? Can a person be sweet? Can a person be soft? While preschoolers understood the literal physical references, they did not understand the metaphorical psychological references. They described cold people as those not dressed warmly; hard people were those with firm muscles. One preschooler described his mother as “sweet” but only because she cooked sweet things, not because she was nice.

 

"Asch and Nerlove observed that only between the ages of seven and ten did children begin to understand the psychological meanings of these descriptions. Some seven- and eight-year-olds said that hard people are tough, bright people are cheerful, and crooked people do bad things. But only some of the eleven- and twelve-year-olds were able to actually describe the metaphorical link between the physical condition and the psychological state. Some nine- and ten-year-olds, for instance, were able to explain that both the sun and bright people “beamed.” Children’s metaphorical competence, it seems, is limited to basic perceptual metaphors, at least until early adolescence."

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