Into the Driver's Seat
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Into the Driver's Seat
Building the independence of learners through thoughtful uses of technology
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Rescooped by Jim Lerman from :: The 4th Era ::
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How Einstein Thought: Fostering Combinatorial Creativity and Unconscious Connections ~ Brain Pickings

How Einstein Thought: Fostering Combinatorial Creativity and Unconscious Connections ~ Brain Pickings | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

by Maria Popova

 

"For as long as I can remember — and certainly long before I had the term for it — I’ve believed that creativity is combinatorial: Alive and awake to the world, we amass a collection of cross-disciplinary building blocks — knowledge, memories, bits of information, sparks of inspiration, and other existing ideas — that we then combine and recombine, mostly unconsciously, into something “new.” From this vast and cross-disciplinary mental pool of resources beckons the infrastructure of what we call our “own” “original” ideas. The notion, of course, is not new — some of history’s greatest minds across art, science, poetry, and cinema have articulated it, directly or indirectly, in one form or another: Arthur Koestler’s famous theory of “bisociation” explained creativity through the combination of elements that don’t ordinarily belong together; graphic designer Paula Scher likens creativity to a slot machine that aligns the seemingly random jumble of stuff in our heads into a suddenly miraculous combination; T. S. Eliot believed that the poet’s mind incubates fragmentary thoughts into beautiful ideas; the great Stephen Jay Gouldmaintained that connecting the seemingly unconnected is the secret of genius;Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press embodied this combinatorial creativity; even what we call “intuition” is based on the unconscious application of this very mental faculty.

 

"The concept, in fact, was perhaps best explained by Albert Einstein, who termed it “combinatory play.” (Einstein famously came up with some of his best scientific ideas during his violin breaks.) From his Ideas and Opinions (public library) — the same invaluable volume that gave us the beloved physicist’s timeless wisdom on kindness and our shared existence — comes Einstein’s single most succinct articulation of how his mind works, driven by this powerful combinatorial creativity. The 1945 letter was written in response to French mathematician Jacques S. Hadamard’s survey of the mental processes of famous scientists, inspired by polymath Henri Poincaré’s famous meditation on the subject and published as An Essay on the Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field, with Einstein’s missive included as a “testimonial”:

 

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When Students Are Inspired, They and Their Teachers Are Happier

When Students Are Inspired, They and Their Teachers Are Happier | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

Happiness interview: Andrew Mangino. By Gretchen Rubin...

 

How can we usher in a new era of happiness (and inspiration) in America's schools?


I had to include this question because it's the one I think about every day!

 

Our team at The Future Project believes that just as there is an achievement gap, there is also an inspiration deficit in our schools. When students (and teachers, administrators, custodians, coaches, and parents) are not inspired, they are not happy -- at least not as happy as they could be! Nor do they learn well; reform, we believe, must be built on a foundation of inspiration. So, we're aiming to bring about the world in which all students have found something that inspires and truly excites them, whether civil engineering, French food, botany, or the Roaring Twenties, and channeled it to improve the world around them. All before finishing high school!

 

Read more, very interesting...:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-happiness-project/201107/when-students-are-inspired-they-and-their-teachers-are-happier

 


Via Gust MEES, Aki Puustinen, Jim Lerman
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Konstantinos Kalemis's comment, July 5, 2012 4:51 AM
1. Explain. Some recent research shows that many students do poorly on assignments or in participation because they do not understand what to do or why they should do it. Teachers should spend more time explaining why we teach what we do, and why the topic or approach or activity is important and interesting and worthwhile.
2. Reward. Students who do not yet have powerful intrinsic motivation to learn can be helped by extrinsic motivators in the form of rewards. Rather than criticizing unwanted behaviour or answers, reward correct behaviour and answers.
3. Care. Students respond with interest and motivation to teachers who appear to be human and caring.
4. Have students participate. One of the major keys to motivation is the active involvement of students in their own learning.
5. Teach Inductively.
6. Satisfy students' needs. Attending to need satisfaction is a primary method of keeping students interested and happy.
7. Make learning visual. Use drawings, diagrams, pictures, charts, graphs, bulleted lists, even three-dimensional objects you can bring to class to help students anchor the idea to an image.
8. Use positive emotions to enhance learning and motivation. Strong and lasting memory is connected with the emotional state and experience of the learner.

Konstantinos Kalemis's comment, July 5, 2012 4:52 AM
Also, we have a large number of WEB 2.0 tools for free use in our class.
Gust MEES's comment, July 5, 2012 5:08 AM
@Konstantinos Kalemis,

Hi,
Thanks for your comment, much appreciated...

have a nice day :-)
Gust
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Eclectic Technology
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Can You Become Smarter? Students Who Say Yes Act More Intelligently

Can You Become Smarter? Students Who Say Yes Act More Intelligently | Into the Driver's Seat | Scoop.it

Can intelligence be changed? This article explores this issue, looking at work by Carol Dweck (and colleagues). It looks at "fixed mindsets" and "growth mindsets" and student whom have "growth mindsets" engage "in adaptive behaviors, such as focusing on mastering concepts and developing new strategies after making mistakes."  

Students with "fixed mindsets showed decrements in performance when faced with negative feedback or failure."

Additional information is found in the article.


Via Beth Dichter
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