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How to Explain Your Career Transition

How to Explain Your Career Transition | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

''Shifting careers is often hard to explain...The most important step in getting others onboard with your caeer transition is crafting a compelling narrative.''

Bob Corlett's insight:


Great advice that seems somewhat obvious, but is often hard for candidates to do well. Follow these steps for a better chance at success.

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CATHLEEN SLONE's curator insight, June 27, 2013 3:44 PM

Identify underlying themes that connect professional experiences #innov8u #careers #hiring #transition

Melissa St Hill's curator insight, July 8, 2013 2:08 PM

For candidates that are interviewing, this guide may be worth checking out as it explains how to speak about transitions within your career where some can sometimes struggle with in an interview situation.

Cruise Line Class's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:39 AM

The good news is when you are able to explain your career transition face-to-face. 

 

Good tips in this article. 

 

My advice:  Once you know what you are going to say -- how your going to say it is just as important. 

Practice with friends and make sure that you sound honest, genuine, and real.  You won't land a job when the recruiter feels sorry for you.

 

Remember how you say it is an inside job.  You have to believe it inside first.  Believing in what you are saying so that it doesn't sound like you are making excuses for yourself is important.

 

What tips have helped you?

Interviewing and Hiring
Interviewing and Hiring Advice for Small to Mid-Size Organizations
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We Just Can’t Handle Diversity

We Just Can’t Handle Diversity | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it
A research roundup
Bob Corlett's insight:

This brilliant article should be required reading for everyone who interviews or manages people.

 

"While merit sounds like an easy, obvious filter for talent decisions, it’s anything but. We believe we know good talent when we see it, yet we usually don’t—we’re terrible at evaluating people objectively. That’s why orchestras started holding blind auditions decades ago. It’s why today algorithms often make smarter hires than people do. It’s why so many companies are searching for alternatives to traditional performance reviews.

 

Even (and especially) when leaders proclaim a commitment to fairness in their organizations, stereotypes cause them to evaluate and treat equal performers differently, as Emilio Castilla, of MIT, and Stephen Benard, of Indiana University, have demonstrated in their well-known research on the “paradox of meritocracy.”

 

What’s tripping us up? Robert H. Frank, a Cornell economist and the author ofSuccess and Luck, provides one explanation: We just don’t see the large role that chance events play in people’s life trajectories. If someone lands a great job and makes lots of money, we interpret those outcomes as evidence of smarts and hard work. (We look at our own lives the same way.) As for those who don’t thrive? Well, we tell ourselves, maybe they’ve caught a bad break here and there, but they could turn things around if they tugged on their bootstraps a bit harder."

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5 Big Reasons Not to Hire for Culture Fit

5 Big Reasons Not to Hire for Culture Fit | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it
Zappo's and others show a better way to interview and hire awesome people.
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The Best Job Candidates Don't Always Have College Degrees - The Atlantic

The Best Job Candidates Don't Always Have College Degrees - The Atlantic | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"Degrees and good grades have long been proxies for the kind of cognitive skills required for jobs in knowledge industries. But many say that these credentials don’t meaningfully predict job performance, and companies are starting to catch onto that. “There is a long literature in psychology showing that job performance and college grades are poorly related,” says Peter Cappelli, a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania who studies hiring and the American workplace. “It is remarkable how frequently companies rely on hiring criteria for which there is no evidence of it working.”

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Employees Can’t Be Summed Up by a Personality Test

Employees Can’t Be Summed Up by a Personality Test | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"People are not easy to understand, and—here’s where I disagree with the assessments—they shouldnt bePeople are too interesting and too complicated to be summed up in a simple assessment ... Curiosity is a better assessment tool.:

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Hiring is Not as Rational as you Think

Hiring is Not as Rational as you Think | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

We are all less rational at work than we would like to believe. Here's what science shows about hiring and performance management.  


One study showed that, "... interviewers rate candidates more negatively when they have been given negative information about them beforehand" 

 

Another study showed that, "... managers are less likely to notice mistakes in their employees when they were responsible for hiring them, because the alternative would be to admit that they were wrong, which would make them feel stupid."


"When someone makes us feel good – intentionally or not – we will be more likely to agree with their views and be persuaded by them."

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We’re All Terrible at Understanding Each Other

We’re All Terrible at Understanding Each Other | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"The way we see one another is far from fair.  In fact, much of this process of perceiving other people isn’t even rational.  It is biased, incomplete, and inflexible.  It is also largely (but not entirely) automatic."


"In the 1980’s, psychologists Susan Fiske and Shelly Taylor were looking for a way to describe what research was showing to be a ubiquitous tendency among humans: to think only as much as they feel they need to, and no more.  And so the metaphor of the cognitive miser was born, with each of us an Ebenezer Scrooge – except instead of sitting on piles of money and refusing to pay for an extra lump of coal to keep the house warm, we sit on reserves of mental energy and processing capacity, unwilling to spend much of it unless we really have to.  We rely on simple, efficient thought processes to get the job done – not so much out of laziness (though there is some of that, too), but out of necessity.  There is just too much going on, too much to notice, understand, and act on for us to give every individual and every occurrence our undivided, unbiased attention."

Bob Corlett's insight:

If you ever wondered why so many interviews go astray, here's why. 

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The Talent Myth

The Talent Myth | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"The talent myth assumes that people make organizations smart. More often than not, it’s the other way around... Groups don’t write great novels, and a committee didn’t come up with the theory of relativity. But companies work by different rules. They don’t just create; they execute and compete and coordinate the efforts of many different people, and the organizations that are most successful at that task are the ones where the system is the star" 


Bob Corlett's insight:

A classic from 2002, rich with stories of arrogance, narcissism and Enron. It's an important cautionary tale about hiring "stars" and assuming that will take care of everything.  

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Why We Love Narcissists

Why We Love Narcissists | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"After decades of scientific research, psychologists have begun to deconstruct the seductive power of narcissists, explaining the precise mechanisms underlying their charm and ability to get ahead in all domains of life."


"Much like crack cocaine, the charm of narcissists produces an intense but short-lived high ...As a seminal study in this area showed, the charisma of narcissists wears off after a mere 2.5 hours .... So, when dealing with charismatic individuals, a good rule of thumb is to delay making decisions — whether to hire that person, promote them, or take them on as clients — until you work out who they really are."


Bob Corlett's insight:

This article is pure gold. In just a few minutes you'll better understand how narcissists get ahead, and how you can innoculate yourself against their charms.

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Managing: How to short-circuit an interview if the candidate obviously isn't right (and be nice about it) - The Business Journals

Managing: How to short-circuit an interview if the candidate obviously isn't right (and be nice about it) - The Business Journals | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

As a manager, we all have had to interview a person where you know five minutes in that there is zero chance you are going to proceed with them. Sometimes it’s a lack of interest on their end, inability to answer clearly or professionally, or maybe just being woefully unqualified. Is there a nice way to cut bait?

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How to Find and Hire Top Performers That Everyone Else Fails to Notice

How to Find and Hire Top Performers That Everyone Else Fails to Notice | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"Most team building advice says "get the best people." Like it's that easy. How can you use Moneyball methods to find the diamonds in the rough?... Look for the obviously bright people who are struggling in spots where they’re all but set up to fail."

Bob Corlett's insight:

"Research shows we give too much weight to individual personality and efforts and too little to context."

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Imagine Your Ideal Salesperson. Turns Out Your Mental Picture is Probably Wrong.

Imagine Your Ideal Salesperson. Turns Out Your Mental Picture is Probably Wrong. | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"If you're looking for an employee on the front lines of your business (salespeople, customer service, etc), you might have this image of an outgoing, gregarious individual. Or maybe you picture the aggressive (pushy?) self-confident types, who relentlessly drive sales results.


Well, I hate to break it to you, but you (and pop culture) are wrong – these types are actually the worst choices for your front lines."

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In Head-Hunting, Big Data May Not Be Such a Big Deal

In Head-Hunting, Big Data May Not Be Such a Big Deal | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it
Laszlo Bock, senior vice president of people operations at Google, says some data is essentially worthless in assessing job candidates: G.P.A.’s, for instance, and test scores.
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Bob Corlett's comment, June 28, 2013 5:02 PM
It's always nice to have my ideas validated. Congrats to Google. It's about time they realized that dumping the crazy brain-teaser interview questions and removing a heavy emphasis on credentials is a good idea.

To their credit, at least they used their massive data resources to change their minds - if only to prove what I've been saying for years.
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10 Qualities of Exceptional Interviewers

10 Qualities of Exceptional Interviewers | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it
Everyone agrees no business is better than its employees. So if hiring the right people is so important... why are most interviewers satisfied with being mediocre interviewers? Maybe they assume the
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The Myth of A-Players

The Myth of A-Players | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

Study after study shows that transferring what you know from one context to another is difficult and unreliable. Ron Johnson, Jeff Smisek, Juergen Schrempp, Marissa Mayer, and Richard Thoman aren’t outliers, they’re just some of the more familiar examples of a phenomenon that is all too common. None of them “lost their touch” or were exposed as frauds – they only changed settings. It bears repeating: skills are more specific and more difficult to transfer than many of us would like to believe. You can’t divorce performance outcomes from context, because the context is the thing you’re actually good at.

So what is context? And why is it such a critical determinant of performance? Google defines context as “the circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood and assessed.” As that definition implies, you cannot fully understand and assess an outcome without understanding thecircumstances that formed the setting.

It’s true for political outcomes and the political leaders that produce them. It would be foolish to assume that Abraham Lincoln or Winston Churchill would have been effective leaders in different nations and times. And the same is true for business outcomes and the business leaders that produce those. The context is what makes a person good or bad.

Bob Corlett's insight:

This well-written and well-researched article echoes the themes of a post we wrote 3 years ago: http://staffingadvisors.com/2013/08/09/the-pitfalls-of-hiring-judging-performance-without-context/ 

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3 Reasons Why a Tough Job Interview is Better

3 Reasons Why a Tough Job Interview is Better | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

When your interview process includes hurdles like a skills test, background check and panel interview, it may lead to increased employee satisfaction later..

Bob Corlett's insight:

Don't worry about having a rigorous hiring process. According to research conducted by Glassdoor, a tougher hiring process correlates with higher employee satisfaction later. 


Bear in mind that research can only correlate the two factors, not make the claim that tough interviews actually cause employee satisfaction. (It could simply be the case that better employers can afford to be more rigorous interviewers.)


That said, there are a host of reasons that tough interviews can benefit both employers and employees. As the new hire: 

  • You have better, more thoroughly vetted colleagues
  • You tend to value what you had to work for
  • You might be more confident that you are a good fit to the job
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5 Ways to Avoid Job Interview Bias - The Muse

5 Ways to Avoid Job Interview Bias - The Muse | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"People are naturally biased, which means even when you intend to be fair, your brain has a hard time being impartial. Subconsciously, you may let one major accomplishment overshadow a candidate’s shortcoming, only remember the last thing the interviewee said, or even favor better-looking applicants.


If you truly want to find the best person for the job, it’s essential that you commit to actions that will help you be a less-biased interviewer and objectively evaluate every candidate you’re considering."

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Are you a 'disruptive talent' like Sir Richard Branson? - BBC News

Are you a 'disruptive talent' like Sir Richard Branson? - BBC News | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it
The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson explores the latest business buzz phrase - "disruptive talent" - and why Sir Richard Branson thinks companies should employ more of them.
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Why I’m Not a Diversity Officer -

Why I’m Not a Diversity Officer - | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"To find diverse candidates, take a close look at your sourcing strategy ... Many organizations rely heavily on referrals or favor specific sourcing methods. Diverse candidates will learn about your company via different channels. First generation college graduates or experienced professionals from different industries may not have contacts in your organization, rendering them invisible to your referral networks."

Bob Corlett's insight:

If you want real diversity, think carefully about how you develop your pool of potential candidates. 

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The Problem with Using Personality Tests for Hiring

The Problem with Using Personality Tests for Hiring | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"If your hiring process relies primarily on interviews, reference checks, and personality tests, you are choosing to use a process that is significantly less effective than it could be."

Bob Corlett's insight:

Extensive research has been done on the ability of various hiring methods and measures to actually predict job performance ... but nobody seems to have read the research. .

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5 Myths about Introverts and Extraverts at Work

5 Myths about Introverts and Extraverts at Work | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it
Bob Corlett's insight:

Much of the conventional wisdom about introverts and extroverts is simply wrong, and not supported by the evidence. 

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Why Do So Many Incompetent Men Become Leaders?

Why Do So Many Incompetent Men Become Leaders? | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"...we tend to equate leadership with the very psychological features that make the average man a more inept leader than the average woman."


"...the same psychological characteristics that enable male managers to rise to the top of the corporate or political ladder are actually responsible for their downfall. In other words, what it takes to get the job is not just different from, but also the reverse of, what it takes to do the job well. As a result, too many incompetent people are promoted to management jobs, and promoted over more competent people."

Bob Corlett's insight:

Here is more evidence that what it takes to do well in a leadership interview is quite different than what it takes to lead.. 

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The Paradoxical Traits Of Resilient People

The Paradoxical Traits Of Resilient People | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"Resilient people develop a mental capacity that allows them to adapt with ease during adversity. Like bamboo they bend but rarely break. Resilient people possess a set of paradoxical traits."

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The Pitfalls of Hiring: Judging Performance Without Context

The Pitfalls of Hiring: Judging Performance Without Context | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it
Humanity has always relied on our ability to make snap judgments of strangers so we could survive, otherwise there was always the chance of being caught unawares by a dangerous rival warrior masque...
Bob Corlett's insight:

Understanding the environment that helped shape a candidate’s success or failure is one of the most important lessons to learn in hiring. So if you’re trying to hire someone, it’s a terrible idea to focus on their successes and assume that they will be equally successful in your environment.

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Melissa St Hill's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:53 AM

Some good information which can be useful when looking to hire - it is not necessarily true that because someone has performed well in a previous role that they will be just as great (or better) in the new role - it is good to look at successes as well as hardships - really identify what made the person perform well - 

 

It has been identified countless times how beneficial it can be to run technical testing or scenarios whilst interviewing candidates to slightly identify how this person can put their talk to action – even get them into the environment they will be working within and see how they react –

 

It is not just about a glowing track record – be sure to look at all the factors that lead to the person’s success.

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The Problem With Personality Tests - ERE.net

The Problem With Personality Tests - ERE.net | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

"Personality tests, in even the best cases, are better left in training workshops where they can help people understand differences. Using them to make hiring decisions will always lead to turning away skilled candidates and hiring unskilled ones."

Bob Corlett's insight:

Great advice for hiring managers. 

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How to Explain Your Career Transition

How to Explain Your Career Transition | Interviewing and Hiring | Scoop.it

''Shifting careers is often hard to explain...The most important step in getting others onboard with your caeer transition is crafting a compelling narrative.''

Bob Corlett's insight:


Great advice that seems somewhat obvious, but is often hard for candidates to do well. Follow these steps for a better chance at success.

more...
CATHLEEN SLONE's curator insight, June 27, 2013 3:44 PM

Identify underlying themes that connect professional experiences #innov8u #careers #hiring #transition

Melissa St Hill's curator insight, July 8, 2013 2:08 PM

For candidates that are interviewing, this guide may be worth checking out as it explains how to speak about transitions within your career where some can sometimes struggle with in an interview situation.

Cruise Line Class's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:39 AM

The good news is when you are able to explain your career transition face-to-face. 

 

Good tips in this article. 

 

My advice:  Once you know what you are going to say -- how your going to say it is just as important. 

Practice with friends and make sure that you sound honest, genuine, and real.  You won't land a job when the recruiter feels sorry for you.

 

Remember how you say it is an inside job.  You have to believe it inside first.  Believing in what you are saying so that it doesn't sound like you are making excuses for yourself is important.

 

What tips have helped you?