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Rescooped by Hannah Wilson from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Bloom's Digital Taxonomy Verbs

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy Verbs | interpreting language | Scoop.it

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Julie Lindsay's curator insight, June 16, 2015 4:31 PM

This infographic puts the Blooms digital taxonomy into a more workable format

RESENTICE's curator insight, June 17, 2015 8:40 AM

Tous les verbes d'action correspondant à chacune des étapes de la taxonomie digitale de BLOOM depuis la mémorisation jusqu'à la créativité...à destination des formateurs


jbcassidy's curator insight, July 23, 2015 8:53 AM

Great tool to keep the  language in one place and remind us to challenge students in many different ways! May also spark some ideas for Genius Hour projects that are deeper.

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Spare a Thought for Your Interpreting Teacher (Part 1 – Consecutive*)

Spare a Thought for Your Interpreting Teacher (Part 1 – Consecutive*) | interpreting language | Scoop.it
Teaching consecutive interpreting technique is hard. If you think mastering the art of note-taking is a challenge, try teaching it sometime!

I think that part of the challenge of teaching consec...

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Justice is lost in translation turmoil | The Sunday Times

Justice is lost in translation turmoil | The Sunday Times | interpreting language | Scoop.it

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interpreter's curator insight, January 12, 2014 7:37 AM

THE National Audit Office has launched a new investigation into the Ministry of Justice’s outsourcing of court interpreters, after nearly 10,000 complaints about the service offered by contractor Capita.

Judges, barristers and court officials are arguing that the £90m contract is delaying proceedings by up to a year and jeopardising cases, including those involving rape and murder.

They claim interpreters often do not turn up or are so bad they are dismissed. As a result, Margaret Hodge, chairwoman of the public accounts committee (PAC), has started an investigation.

The inquiry will look into the costs incurred by problems with the service and the extent to which courts are bypassing it to find their own interpreters. Last year the PAC released a damning report into how the contract was originally awarded and implemented.

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World's First Children's Storybook App With Sign Language

World's First Children's Storybook App With Sign Language | interpreting language | Scoop.it

"ITV announced the launch of the world's first animated storybook app with British and American Sign Language. The Signed Stories apphttp://ow.ly/fyiMz   is designed to make reading fun for all children."


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Has An Identity Crisis Immobilized The Field of Sign Language Interpreting? | Street Leverage

Has An Identity Crisis Immobilized The Field of Sign Language Interpreting? | Street Leverage | interpreting language | Scoop.it
Do sign language interpreters believe they are the only ones who “understand” their work? Stacey Storme suggests this perspective is part of an active crisis w/in the field.

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, December 3, 2013 12:38 PM

During my attendance at the 2012 Region IV RID Conference in Denver and the 2013 National RID Conference in Indianapolis I found myself in tears more than once. While it is not uncommon for me to become emotional when I am with colleagues discussing the very serious, real and important issues that impact our work as interpreters, the tears I felt at these conferences were different. It was not until a moment of clarity during the business meeting in Indianapolis that I realized the difference.

It was not long after the start of the Business meeting in Indianapolis when I experienced a shift in my awareness about my emotional response during both conferences. It occurred as I was witnessing discussion and decisions regarding the use of spoken English via open microphone. As I was sitting there, feeling helpless, looking around the room feeling the heavy and volatile energy – I realized I felt as if I was witnessing a war. A battle waged between two perspectives, the deaf and hearing world, both fighting for recognition.

As a person who has grown up in both worlds, I have struggled with my own identity and place in each world since I can remember. Sitting there, I found myself relating with perspectives from both “sides.” As I type this, it strikes me that it may not seem such a powerful realization. After all, this struggle between the two worlds has been going on for years.

By framing this struggle through the lens of war and making the connection between my internal struggle and the mirror reflecting around me I found clarity that I have not yet experienced.

- See more at: http://www.streetleverage.com/2013/12/has-an-identity-crisis-immobilized-the-field-of-sign-language-interpreting/#sthash.6XHLkLBc.dpuf

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Leadership in Sign Language Interpreting: Where are We?

Leadership in Sign Language Interpreting: Where are We? | interpreting language | Scoop.it
History of Leadership: It is difficult to discuss the history of leadership in the field of sign language interpreting without first selecting a starting point for our history as a “field.” Some consider this point the juncture at which the shift from volunteer interpreter to paid interpreter began, and the time at which training standards and rules of conduct for the practice of sign language interpreting started to become formalized.

Birth of a Field

The juncture at which this shift from volunteer to paid interpreter is most easily identified as June 17, 1964 – the opening date of the Workshop on Interpreting for the Deaf at Ball State Teachers College in Muncie, Indiana. The purpose of this workshop, and later of RID, was

“…to establish standards for interpreters for the deaf; to suggest training, curricula, and criteria for admission to training courses for interpreters; to develop a manual and/or other guidelines for interpreters for the deaf, both for the hearing and the deaf individuals involved; and to collect and identify the manuals and booklets dealing with dactylogy” (Fant, 1989, p.2).

It was at this workshop that two men, and later a total of 64 workshop participants, discussed the idea of forming an organization of interpreters that could also “assess interpreter competency and maintain a registry of them so consumers could be assured of receiving quality service” (Fant, 1989, p.1-2). RID was born as a result, and thus marks our official beginning as a “field.”

Relevant Experience


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Nick Cheripka's comment, March 6, 2014 10:06 AM
#6 before june 17 1964 people wernt getting paid for communicating with the deaf. where this was established was in munice indiana. the reasoning of this convention was to establish a new inerpreting career to help deaf people.
Nick Cheripka's comment, March 6, 2014 10:13 AM
#7 because more and more workers who are getting hired are so young they are lacking in some of there skills. for example no first experince view with deaf people. and with less education on the subjects.
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Roger Beeson British Sign Language Interpreter – A Personal Journey | Deaf Unity

Roger Beeson British Sign Language Interpreter – A Personal Journey | Deaf Unity | interpreting language | Scoop.it
Roger Beeson talks about his substantial experience as a Teacher of the Deaf, becoming a sign language interpreter and recent investigations into Access To Work.

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interpreter's curator insight, January 17, 2013 7:15 PM

On top of this, governments have striven to force new ways of delivering public services: privatization, outsourcing, block contracts. Agencies and companies with no track record in BSL interpreting have gained contracts on the basis of charging less. They have to deliver a service, sometimes delivering a body, but not a qualified or competent interpreter. This has happened in courts and in hospitals.
At a time when unity in campaigning for better standards of BSL interpreting is needed, the Deaf world seems fragmented and resigned. The holy grails of a BSL Act, and protected status for interpreters (which would only allow suitably-qualified people to call themselves ‘interpreter”) seem further away than ever.

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Signs of the times: deaf community minds its language

Signs of the times: deaf community minds its language | interpreting language | Scoop.it

Signs of the times: deaf community minds its language
First major study of how British sign language has evolved shows younger users are more reluctant to use 'offensive' signs

Amelia Hill
The Guardian, Sunday 7 October 2012 15.43 BST

The letter 'A' fingerspelled in British sign language. Younger BSL users are less likely to draw attention to the eyes when describing something Chinese. Photograph: David Levene
Political correctness has caught up with Britain's deaf community. It is no longer acceptable to sign a slanted eye when talking about the Chinese or to mime a hook nose when referring to Jewish people. The flick of a limp wrist is now an offensive signal for homosexuals. A finger pointing to an imaginary spot in the middle of a forehead is no longer appropriate as the sign for India.

The first UK-wide survey into how British sign language (BSL) is used by deaf people of different ages has found a seismic shift has taken place in the signs used by different generations.

For deaf people aged between 16 and 30, the only culturally sensitive way to indicate China is to draw the right hand from the signer's heart horizontally across their chest, then down towards the hip, indicating the shape of a Mao jacket.

Their sign for a Jewish man or woman is a hand resting against the chin and making a short movement down, in the shape of a beard. A gay person is indicated with an upright thumb on one hand in the palm of the other, wobbling from side to side. India is


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