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“Practice in a real setting”: Heriot-Watt students improve their skills in the Scottish Parliament

“Practice in a real setting”: Heriot-Watt students improve their skills in the Scottish Parliament | Interpreting | Scoop.it
For three Thursdays in a row, Heriot-Watt MSc students from the Translation and Conference Interpreting course have had a unique chance to hone their skills in a professional booth at the Scottish ...

Via Charles Tiayon
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Excellent training opportunity!

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Home Office defends urgent interview provisions | UK Police News - Police Oracle

Home Office defends urgent interview provisions | UK Police News - Police Oracle | Interpreting | Scoop.it
Officers 'have necessary skills to communicate with detainees non-verbally' department says after HMIC concerns.

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interpreter's curator insight, November 10, 2013 6:18 PM
Home Office defends 'urgent' interview provisionsOfficers 'have necessary skills to communicate with detainees non-verbally' department says after HMIC concerns.Date - 30th October 2013
By - Jack Sommers - Police Oracle2 Comments

 

The Home Office has defended a provision of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) which allows “urgent” detainee interviews – including those detained the Terrorism Act - to be conducted in ways other than speaking.

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary raised concerns about provisions in Code C and H in PACE.

They stipulate an officer of superintendent rank can authorise an urgent interview to proceed - without a interpreter the detainee would normally be entitled to - if the interviewing officer speaks to them in their language or can “otherwise establish effective communication”.

The Home Office suggested drawing pictures or writing questions down as alternatives to trying to communicate verbally with a detainee. A spokesman said it would be for a court to decide how valuable the detainee’s responses were as evidence.

The PACE codes were amended on October 27 to redefine 17-year-olds as juveniles.

In its submission to the consultation on this change, HMIC said: “This text (regarding urgent interviews) lacks clarity and should be presented using clearer language, particularly as it relates to vulnerable detainees who require an urgent interview.

“Furthermore, we consider that “effective communication” can only be achieved if the interviewer speaks the same language or dialect and cannot be achieved by any other means as implied.”

The Home Office agreed to clarify the text but did not remove the provision that allows non-verbal questioning, saying investigators from police forces, Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs and the UK Border Force all agreed it was necessary.

A spokesman told PoliceOracle.com: “PACE codes C and H allow for suspects to be questioned in emergency, potentially life-threatening situations.

“We believe that in these scenarios police officers have the skills to communicate effectively with suspects in ways other than speaking, for example by using written questions in their own language or pictures. The codes should not prevent them from doing so.

“The evidential value of the suspect’s responses would be determined by a court.”

 

Anonymous - Thu, 31 October 2013
“Furthermore, we consider that “effective communication” can only be achieved if the interviewer speaks the same language or dialect and cannot be achieved by any other means as implied.” - as a forensic linguist I could not agree more.

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Whispering and the origin of simultaneous interpreting

Whispering and the origin of simultaneous interpreting | Interpreting | Scoop.it

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