Internet, Social ...
Follow
2.8K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Elizabeth Milovidov from Be e-Safe
onto Internet, Social Media and Online Safety
Scoop.it!

Is it ok to let my kids play with the iPad when I need a break?

Is it ok to let my kids play with the iPad when I need a break? | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
I have two kids, ages 7 and 2. My eldest is given access to the iPad on car trips and once in a while at home. My younger son likes to sit by his brother while he plays and of late, has been pointing to it and asking for it.

 

 The content each child is using should be developmentally optimal for each child—and that means having different content for each. Here are some tips to manage time and content:

 

Choose content with each child in mind. You can use parent reviews fromCommon Sense Media to decide which apps, books, and games to try out, choosing a variety of activities such as finger painting, making music, and, for your 7-year-old, activities and games with reading, math, and science.

 

Use it with them sometimes. The way that kids best use technology to learn and grow is with adult interaction and guidance, bonding with them and “scaffolding” their explorations.

 

Use the tablet as part of their rich experience, rather than a babysitter.Continue to foster the same expectations for tablet time with your 2-year-old as you have done with your 7-year-old. While it is okay employ the tablet to smooth car rides or even to grab a few moments to work, I would recommend against using it at mealtimes for a host of physical and mental health reasons. It is important that the iPad doesn’t become an expected (or demanded) part of the daily routine and remains a special, once-in-a-while activity.


Via Anna Karidi Pirounaki
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

And while Common Sense Media is an awesome tool to help parents, nothing beats good ol' 'staying in the room' surveillance.  Keeping your ears open for inappropriate content is the best way to keep the ipad safe.  And do use kid appropriate browsers for youtube, because even a two year old can swipe himself into some inappropriate viewing material.

more...
No comment yet.
Internet, Social Media and Online Safety
keep kids safe and parents sane online and off
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Over half of UK parents unaware if their children are being cyberbullied

Over half of UK parents unaware if their children are being cyberbullied | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Over half of British parents admit they wouldn't know if their children were being cyberbullied and also would not know what to do
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Is Parenting On Social Media A Good Idea? - Health Aim

Is Parenting On Social Media A Good Idea? - Health Aim | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Parenting on social media is becoming a common practice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

'Sharenting': Parents sharing and oversharing on social media

'Sharenting': Parents sharing and oversharing on social media | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
"Sharenting" is the new buzzword for parents who share the activities of their children on social media. While it's a nice way to let friends and family be a part of your child's life...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Are Moms Overinvolved in Their Kids' Online Lives?

Are Moms Overinvolved in Their Kids' Online Lives? | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
CHICAGO (CBS) — With sites like Instagram, Snapchat and Kik gaining in popularity among tweens and teens, parents face unique challenges in keeping kids safe while trying to foster independence. In a recent New York Times blog… Chicago News, Sports, Weather, Traffic, and the Best of Chicago - CBS 2 TV | WBBM Newsradio 780 | 670 The Score
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

DIGITAL PARENTS: are you over-involved in your kids' online lives?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Digital kidnapping trend terrifies parents

Digital kidnapping trend terrifies parents | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Parents are discovering that their children's photos are being stolen from social media websites and being re-posted by others users claiming the child is their own.
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

PARENTS: use discretion when posting photos of your children on social media websites!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Internet of Things Barbie Could Let Hackers Spy On Children

Internet of Things Barbie Could Let Hackers Spy On Children | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
A new WiFi Barbie doll presents parents with a new set of online security worries
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

Parents: what do you think of wifi Barbie? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Parenting in the Digital Era

Parenting in the Digital Era | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
As James Baldwin said, "Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them." If parental digital illiteracy can cause one type of problems to children, parental overindulgence in tech...
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

A worthwhile read on digital parenting!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Three Features in Instagram Parents and Teens Need to Know About : Yoursphere for Parents – Helping Families Live Healthy Digital Lives

Three Features in Instagram Parents and Teens Need to Know About : Yoursphere for Parents – Helping Families Live Healthy Digital Lives | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

DIGITAL PARENTS: understand those localisation features.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Current guidelines to limit kids' screen-based media use 'may not be tenable'

Current guidelines to limit kids' screen-based media use 'may not be tenable' | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
AAP guidelines state children aged 2 and older should spend no more than 2 hours a day using screen-based media. But a new study suggests such recommendations may be unrealistic.
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

Great article arguing for flexibility on screen limits.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Michelle Obama’s next social media challenge: Sasha and Malia

Michelle Obama’s next social media challenge: Sasha and Malia | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
On Christmas Day, the first lady shared an old photo of herself and her husband. He's rocking a sweater vest, she's in wide stripes. The young couple
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

PARENTS: and you thought monitoring YOUR child's online image was difficult.  Check out what Michelle Obama has to deal with.  Feeling grateful yet?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

10 reasons why social media is great for teenagers

10 reasons why social media is great for teenagers | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Addictive, dangerous, and a bad influence, social media is always in the news for the wrong reasons. But as a mother of a teenage daughter, I don't agree the online world is an enemy of our children, in fact here are 10 reasons why I think social media is amazing for our teens...

1. It cheers them up.
Just because my teen's got out of bed the wrong side, or there's no Cookie Crisp cereal left or just 'because', bad moods in our house can strike at any time. But after a quick scan through a few Vines or YouTube my daughter will almost always find something to giggle about. Vines in particularly always make her smile, especially if it's a middle class American boy taking the mickey out of his mum or school, like US online star Adam Waithe.

2. Feedback boosts self- esteem.
Yes, controversial, but although we've all compared and despaired by looking at other's lives online, I've seen my daughter change her view of herself for the positive too. For example she always loathed her beautiful curly semi afro hair. She'd tie it up or want to keep it cut short. But after she'd posted a few pictures of her hair down, compliments came flooding in. Within months she decided to grow it as a long as possible and now she wears it big and with pride now. I used to tell her all the time she had lovely hair, but she needed the wider world to say it too.

3. New friends are just a click away.
Tweeting, Facebook, Vines, Chat apps, Instagram.. social media for teens is more far reaching than ever and as a result a much wider range of potential friendships is available, from across the world. At one point my daughter became very friendly with a fellow teen Tweeter from Australia. Through Facetime they started to chat every day and through the conversations my daughter learned lots about the Oz way of life, and they even started corresponding the old fashioned way by post. She's also made friends from Blackberry messenger, Whats App, and Facebook. It opens up a new world of friendships as long as sensible cautions are taken.

4. Teens can actually get in touch with their heroes.
A few years ago, trying to get in touch with a celebrity would involve standing for hours outside a stage door or sending a letter into the ether to be ignored by an agent. Today's teens can just sent a tweet and can get a reply or retweet from their favourite celebrity if they're lucky.
My teen even had a picture she drew of her favourite YouTuber retweeted, and at the time she said it was the most exciting day of her life (other things have usurped this moment thankfully).

5. It educates us.
Social media appeals to every facet of human emotion, including sharing of issues and problems our teens might not have come across otherwise. A YouTube video called 'How not to react when your child tell you that he's gay' attracted seven million views, and almost moved my teen to tears as it secretly filmed an 18-year-old being verbally abused by his parents for admitting he was gay. Afterwards we talked about homophobia and intolerance and my daughter was outraged it was still an issue in the modern world.

6. Sharing pictures easily.
Thanks to Facebook and Instagram, my teen's pictures and status updates keeps her family in the loop. Grandparents, her uncles and aunties, can all see where she's been and who her friends are and when she meets them they all have something to talk about and in the meantime can 'like' what she's doing to say how proud they are. These days few of us live near our families, so it's an important resource to keep everyone close and in touch.

7. Cheap entertainment.
It's cold and raining? It's the weekend and her friends are busy? She's finished her homework and there's nothing on TV? Looking on the computer or iphone is one my child's favourite ways to spend some free time, to laugh, to message her friends, or just to see what's going on in the world. Not something I want her doing all the time, but it's a boredom buster.

8. A place to turn to for advice.
If my daughter needs to ask a question about homework she doesn't have to bother ringing her friends or waiting until the next day. A few lines on Facebook and she'll have her answers. Or if she's not sure about what to wear for that party or wants someone to walk to school with the next day she only needs to ask. Her friends have even used it to seek advice on difficult subjects like their parents divorcing or overcoming self harm.

9. A place to test out your honesty.
Often people find it easier to express their feelings, rightly or wrongly, from the safety of behind a computer. Clearly trolls prove this doesn't always work for the greater good, but my teen has found expressing herself with written words is sometimes more easy than face-to-face. For example after a fall out with her friends, they have apologized on Twitter or sent an inspirational post on Instagram. Sometimes words online can provide huge comfort or give a motivational insight we might not think of when we try and talk.

10. It's a habit their futures will thank them for.
Like it or not social media is here to stay and many businesses, big or small, are signing up for a piece of the action. One of my teen's friends has managed to attract ( and keep!) 20,000 followers on Twitter using a fan account. That's quite an impressive feat for a 14-year-old boy. How to converse online, attract people to your website and understand your cyber profile, is something many employers will see as a good skill to have in the future. And if they're learning and having fun then all power to the next generation.
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

PARENTS: a must read: a mother argues in favor of social media for our teens.  Do you agree?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

The apps and websites exposing children to sex, violence and bullying

The apps and websites exposing children to sex, violence and bullying | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
In an NSPCC campaign, Mumsnet users were asked to review social networking sites used by young people and were 'shocked and frightened' by what they found.
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

PARENTS: check out these survey results from a NSPCC (National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. What findings are alarming to you?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

School Bullying Statistics

School Bullying Statistics | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

Some bullying statistics to help you understand the problem.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Are You Hooked: The Impact of Social Media on Our Lives

Are You Hooked: The Impact of Social Media on Our Lives | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Overuse of social media might lead us to the future with almost no real conversations. It's in a way easier to talk while hiding behind our profiles as we can create our own personas, an image of ourselves that has nothing to do with the reality....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Are Your Kids Using Decoy Apps to Hide Photos, Videos? - McAfee

Are Your Kids Using Decoy Apps to Hide Photos, Videos? - McAfee | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Wouldn’t it be convenient if the dangers heading toward our kids had neon signs pointing to them? Unfortunately, that’s not the way things work and, more often than not, the dangers are camouflaged, sometimes intentionally. While it’s normal for kids to have secrets, when you add technology to the mix, there might be hidden dangers to …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Introducing the newest member of our family, the YouTube Kids app--available on Google Play and the App Store

Introducing the newest member of our family, the YouTube Kids app--available on Google Play and the App Store | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

#digitalparenting tip: check out YouTube Kids app.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

The apps strangers use to reach children

The apps strangers use to reach children | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Many parents may be surprised about the photos and videos a child may be sharing with friends. They may also be seen by strangers.
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

DIGITAL PARENTS: this one is for you. Click through the slide show to see the apps.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

'Porn in playground' fuels rise in 'child-on-child' sex assaults - Independent.ie

'Porn in playground' fuels rise in 'child-on-child' sex assaults - Independent.ie | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
MORE than 600 children were the victims or perpetrators of rape and sexual assault last year - with some "increasingly violent teen-on-teen" incidents linked to pornography, t
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

In Ireland, access to porn online leads to increase in child on child sexual assault.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

My home - Safer Internet Day

My home - Safer Internet Day | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

I will be speaking on Digital Parenting at the Council of Europe on Feb 10th.  Three cheers for parenting in the digital age!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Teen bullied repeatedly through Snapchat, father responds with viral YouTube video

Teen bullied repeatedly through Snapchat, father responds with viral YouTube video | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Bradley Knudson’s daughter was tormented on social media by a barrage of nasty, racist messages sent through Snapchat, a wildly popular social media app.
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

PARENTS: one dad stands up to bullying of his daughter with viral YouTube video.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Facebook restricts violent videos

Facebook restricts violent videos | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

DIGITAL PARENTING: will Facebook restrictions be enough?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Covert phone monitoring service allows parents to watch kids' digital lives

Covert phone monitoring service allows parents to watch kids' digital lives | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Covert phone monitoring service allows parents to watch kids' digital lives

Jan. 15, 2015

Updated Jan. 16, 2015 1:40 p.m.
View slideshow
Deana Rodriguez of Long Beach has used TeenSafe, a mobile monitoring app, for almost two years to watch over her children's smartphone use. TeenSafe provides parents with the tools to, monitor their children, but also links them with reading materials from field experts to help teach digital parenting.MICHAEL GOULDING, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
By JORDAN GRAHAM / STAFF WRITER

Facebook
Twitter
Email
Comments
PRINT
SEND PDF

Adolescent access

74 percent of teens had a cellphone in 2012.

37 percent of teens had a smartphone 2012.

37 percent of teens send digital messages to friends every day.

20 percent of teens have "sexted."

Over 50 percent of teens report being bullied online.

Sources: Pew Research Center, TeenSafe

Deana Rodriguez’s sons were 7 and 10 when she bought them their first smartphones in 2013, and the Long Beach mom didn’t quite trust the pair to navigate the technology on their own.

It was a lot of power and information to place in the hands of children so young, she says. Some would argue that her kids were too young for the gadgets, she admits. But Rodriguez’s husband, a doctor in an emergency room and trauma center, had seen far too many life-altering injuries to not equip his children with pocket-sized computers for those just-in-case scenarios.

That’s when Rodriguez first heard about TeenSafe.

Her former neighbor, Ameeta Jain of Long Beach, told Rodriguez about a company she had recently co-founded – a service that allowed parents to covertly monitor their children’s phone use, from reading text messages and monitoring call logs, to viewing social media posts and tracking phone locations.

Unsure how else to supervise her children’s burgeoning digital lives, Rodriguez jumped to sign up for the service and became an early subscriber.

“It made me feel reassured,” Rodriguez said. “It made checking-in easier.”

Two years later, the Costa Mesa-based company has 700,000 sign-ups, and users claim the service has helped them uncover bullying issues, eating disorders and even a sexual assault.

With an endorsement from the National PTA signed Friday, the company now sees itself positioned to break open the market of digital parenting.

But few guidelines exist to help establish appropriate norms for cyber supervision. So as parents scramble to keep pace with emerging technology, some youth-development experts have questioned the value of phone-monitoring services, asking: Does prying into a child’s most confidential correspondence take parenting too far?

Keeping up with growth

A March 2013 study by Pew Research Center found that 37 percent of American teens owned a smartphone. A Nielsen study from the same year pegged teen smartphone ownership at 70 percent. TeenSafe claims teen ownership was less than 10 percent five years ago.

That sudden increase has shifted parenting responsibilities into the digital landscape in a way like never before. A decade ago, a family desktop provided kids a way to access information and communicate with friends for a limited time in the living room, and smartphones have extended that window ad infinitum by moving those private conversations behind bedroom doors.

TeenSafe CEO Rawdon Messenger said the shift has left parents feeling removed from their children’s social interactions, unable to protect them from harsh truths and unsure how to adapt conventional parenting techniques to supervise digital communication. Jain said those were the exact concerns that led her to create TeenSafe in late 2011, during a time when her teenagers’ tendency toward cyber communication caused her to feel less adept in guiding their development.

“Parents have finally realized that this rabbit hole is far deeper than it used to be, and there is a strong need for something to help keep an eye on their children,” Messenger said. “You’ve got to treat your child in their mobile, cyber life the same way you would treat them in the real world. So if you’re not comfortable with leaving your child in some part of town or with certain kids, you shouldn’t feel comfortable with them doing that on their phone.”

Parents install TeenSafe as an invisible app on Android phones and sync the service with an iCloud account on Apple products. A subscription costs $15 per month. The service relays information about dialed and received calls, Web browsing and search history, Whatsapp and Kik Messenger messages, Instagram posts, Facebook messages and posts, and all sent, received and deleted text messages (though no text-message photos).

The monitoring is completely legal if the child is younger than 18 and the parent pays the phone bill, and there is no requirement that the parent tell the child about the supervision. Several other child phone-monitoring products also have popped up in recent years.

Testimonials provided by TeenSafe tout the advantages of the service.

In one case, the mother of an autistic teen boy used the tool to ensure her son didn’t face the same bullying he had in past years. In another instance, a dad discovered his teen daughter was depressed, had discussed suicide with others online and had begun cutting herself. A counselor from Austin, Texas, reported that the mom of one of her patients learned via TeenSafe that her daughter had just been drugged and raped, and the mom then tracked down the girl using the app’s locator.

For Rodriguez, the peek into her children’s cyber lives was less jarring. Her most notable discovery was that her youngest son, an avid anime cartoon fan, had unintentionally stumbled across an anime porn website. Rodriguez said she used the misstep as an opportunity to talk to her son, who had already known about the monitoring app.

“It was about clarifying that he had seen an image that was inappropriate for kids and questioning whether he knew what he was looking at,” Rodriguez said. “It was an important teaching moment from my perspective.”

Communicate first, monitor later

When considering the value of cyber-monitoring services, it is important to note the fine line between being a good parent and a helicopter parent that needs to know everything, said UCLA professor Jaana Juvonen. She is a developmental psychologist who has studied adolescent issues for 25 years.

Juvonen said these new services could be helpful to supervise children for whom conventional modes of communication have failed. TeenSafe could be a valuable tool, she said, as a last resort for parents who feel that they really can’t trust their children, who are concerned with the company their children keep, whose children have been repeatedly bullied at school, or who have exhausted all other approaches to starting dialogue.

But she also worried that over-zealous parents will adopt cyber-monitoring as a baseline method for keeping track of their children’s development.

“In general, I would not recommend this strategy,” Juvonen said. “When parents have to snoop around to try to get the scoop … that can really undermine the entire relationship. Teenage-hood is a time when kids need to mature and are entitled to some privacy. To aid in that process, we want to have some level of trust and recognize that kids are not telling their parents everything that they are doing with their friends.”

Among the testimonials provided to the Register were comments from parents that seem to support Juvonen’s fears. Though several stories revealed how the service helped parents help their children, other anecdotes include a dad who scrutinized his daughter’s interactions with boys and a mom who combed through her daughter’s communications only to discover that the girl was a trustworthy and well-adjusted teen.

Juvonen recommended parents try other means of starting conversation, ask for access to their child’s social media accounts and buy their kids old-school cellphones instead of smartphones. And if the parent thinks a monitoring service is absolutely necessary, she recommended the parent tell the child about the cyber supervision.

TeenSafe has encouraged responsible use by creating The TeenSafe Parenting Guide to Tech Safety – an illustrated manual that includes portions directing parents to learn their child’s perspective, help the child understand the parent’s perspective, and set limitations and boundaries for smartphone use. But the manual also states that “monitoring is mandatory” for parents.

Messenger said the service is a tool, and like most tools, it can be used responsibly or abused. TeenSafe does not recommend its tools be used to keep track of children’s activities “in a general way,” he said. But there will come a time for most parents when they could benefit from a service that could help them better monitor their child, he added.

Rodriguez said she plans to continue supervising her kids’ phones with TeenSafe until they turn 18. But when asked how she would monitor the cyber conversations once her children begin dating, Rodriguez paused.

“Hmmm, I hadn’t really thought about that,” she said with a laugh. “Ask me again in a few years.”

TeenSafe says there are 42 million U.S. households with kids between the ages of 8 and 17. Messenger said the company is a long way from capturing a significant portion of that market.
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

PARENTS: communicate first, monitor later - do you agree?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Online Safety Redefined: The 3 Key Elements

Online Safety Redefined: The 3 Key Elements | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it
Online safety has come of age. Kids now create the content we used to try and keep them away from and they do it with immensely powerful devices they carry around with them in their pockets. So it behooves us to take a step back and ask ourselves wh...
Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

PARENTS: risks, harms and rewards of online safety

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Elizabeth Milovidov
Scoop.it!

Welcome - Safer Internet Day

Welcome - Safer Internet Day | Internet, Social Media and Online Safety | Scoop.it

PARE

Elizabeth Milovidov's insight:

Safier Internet Day is Tuesday, February 10th.  Find a SID event near you!

more...
No comment yet.