Internet Presence
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Internet Presence
Creating your own website is challenging. There is too much information, and a lot of it changes rapidly. Tools, articles, information for feeling more comfortable with your own website. @MarcKneepkens
Curated by Marc Kneepkens
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How to see all the companies tracking you on Facebook — and block them

How to see all the companies tracking you on Facebook — and block them | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
If you're using Facebook, you're giving the company a ton of information about yourself, which it is selling to advertisers in one form or another.

Facebook is a great utility if you want to stay in touch with friends and family, share photos, and see what other people are up to in their lives.

It's free, of course, but that doesn't mean it comes without a price. If you're using Facebook, you're giving the company a ton of information about yourself which it is selling to advertisers in one form or another.

Most people forget that when they download an app or sign-in to a website using their Facebook login, they're giving those companies a look into their Facebook profiles. Your profile contains a lot of personal information that can often include your email address and phone number, but frequently also your work history and your current location. And most people don't realise that if you're sharing any of that data with your friends then apps used by those friends can see that data too!

Advertisers, Facebook app developers, and Facebook ad tech partners don't get a direct look at your personal data. They won't see that my name is Jim Edwards, my phone number is 07xxxx, I'm male, and I work at Business Insider — Facebook hashes and anonymises all the data to protect user's privacy and gives it back to partners in bulk so they can't identify individuals — but nevertheless, this data is being used in order to serve you better-targeted ads.


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Via massimo facchinetti
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great info to check once in a while. Some of this may be surprising.

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Jayne Courts's curator insight, August 14, 2015 12:56 PM

This is VERY important to protect your privacy. You never know who is watching you!!

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Governments, The Web and Surveillance

Governments, The Web and Surveillance | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
When the web became commonplace, the decision-makers ignored it, considering it irrelevant. As a result, freedom flourished online. People weren't just consuming content; they were creating it.

But, eventually, politicians and leaders realised how important the internet is. And they realised how useful the internet can be for other purposes — especially for surveillance of citizens. The two chief inventions of our generation — the internet and the mobile phone — changed the world. However, they both turned out to be perfect tools for the surveillance state. And in such a state, everybody is assumed guilty.

US intelligence agencies have a full legal right to monitor foreigners — and most of us are foreigners to the Americans. So when we use US-based services, we are under surveillance — and most of the services we use are US-based.

Advancements in computing power and data storage have made wholesale surveillance possible. But they've also made leaking possible, which will keep organisations worrying about getting caught over any wrongdoing. The future of the web is hanging in the balance between parties that want to keep us under surveillance and parties that want to reveal the nature of such surveillance. Both parties have the data revolution on their side.

While governments are watching over us, they know we're watching over them.



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Via Gust MEES, Marc Kneepkens
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:53 PM


Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=ANT

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Privacy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=NSA

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet?tag=Infographic

 

Looks like George ORWELL was right...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Brother_(Nineteen_Eighty-Four)

 

Forget PRISM, the recent NSA leaks are plain: Digital privacy doesn’t exist...


Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 14, 2014 12:12 AM

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.

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How To Protect Your Business Info From Prying Eyes When Using Public WiFi

How To Protect Your Business Info From Prying Eyes When Using Public WiFi | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

I don’t know about you, but I love working from coffee shops. There is something about it that helps the creativity flow and I seem to be able to write better. From many entrepreneurs that I talk to feel the same way. It’s a great feeling to sit down with a nice Mocha and pump out some good content and complete tasks. But there is one HUGE risk when doing this…

With coffee shops, or anywhere else that offers free public WiFi, it is a perfect place for snoopers and hackers to take all of your files and info. For example, let’s say you jump on Facebook real quick to check out what’s happening… That username and password you just typed in, just went public. Meaning, anyone with the right program (which I am not going to talk about) could have just swiped your info. It’s crazy, but it really is that easy. The same goes for logging on via your tablet or smartphone. Public Hot Spots are NOT safe at all! So the question is, do we risk our privacy for convenience?

Well the good news is, you don’t have to! Your best solution for keeping your info safe while enjoying your local coffee shop is something called a VPN (Virtual Private Network). A VPN helps encrypt your data going through the WiFi. VPNs also provide other features besides just security, but I want to focus on the security aspect in this post.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



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Via Daniel Watson
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Yes! Highly recommended. I have used VPN's for years, living in emerging countries where Skype was blocked and many websites or social networks. Now we use it all the time, even in safe locations, especially when looking up financial accounts. I remember just recently accessing a credit card account, without having my VPN on. The next day this account was hacked. VPN's are a must.

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Ivan Garcia-Hidalgo's curator insight, February 27, 2014 2:41 PM

Want to stay safe while on public WiFi? Well consider using #VPN ---> How To Protect Your Business Info From Prying Eyes When Using Public WiFi #cybersecurity

Jim's curator insight, February 27, 2014 3:33 PM

How often do we stop to log in to get an update on email or social media and figure "what's the risk?" In this case, it could be plenty.

Agi Anderson's curator insight, February 27, 2014 3:34 PM

Get the Scoop on with public WiFi!

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Hackers of the world unite as privacy startups answer Snowden’s call | Information Age

Hackers of the world unite as privacy startups answer Snowden’s call | Information Age | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

How the evolution of privacy startups is helping ordinary web users take back control of their data

Addressing the Hackers on Planet Earth (HOPE) conference over the weekend, Edward Snowden entreated hackers, engineers and activists to fight surveillance by building a new generation of privacy tools for everyone to use.

In fact, privacy startups are already hard at work building tools to help web users protect their privacy in areas such as analytics, encryption and search.

However, there is still much work to do to put these tools into the hands of the ordinary web user.

>See also: The big debate: do we need a privacy charter for the internet?

Since the NSA revelations last year, this task has continued to grow in significance as more and more privacy scares have grabbed the attention of the general public.

Earlier this month, for example, an employee of Germany's intelligence service was arrested on suspicion of spying for the US.

However, it’s not just the NSA that is the guilty party. Corporations such as Google and Facebook are also building treasure troves of personal information to share with others, often without user consent.

Emerging technology startups from around the world have responded to privacy concerns by building user-friendly products in three key areas: analytics, encryption and search.

- See more at: http://www.information-age.com/industry/start-ups/123458283/hackers-world-unite-privacy-startups-answer-snowdens-call#sthash.cOc1xyLN.dpuf


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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Privacy is becoming a very big issue. The public will not let government just call the shots.

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How to keep the NSA from Spying through your Webcam

How to keep the NSA from Spying through your Webcam | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
Spy tools, whether designed by intelligence agencies, cyber crooks or internet creeps, can turn your camera on without illuminating the indicator light. Online tutorials even instruct neophyte hackers on how to hijack your webcam.

You already know that laptops, desktop computers, tablets and mobile phones are all at risk of being hacked. But did you know that intruders might use the built-in camera to take surreptitious pictures and videos of you and your surroundings or hijack your microphone to eavesdrop on conversations?

The latest story from the Edward Snowden leaks yesterday drives home that the NSA and its spy partners possess specialized tools for doing exactly that. According to The Intercept, the NSA uses a plug-in called GUMFISH to take over cameras on infected machines and snap photos.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



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Via TechinBiz
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Are we living in a sci-fi world now? This is amazing. The solutions are downright simple.

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