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Internet Presence
Creating your own website is challenging. There is too much information, and a lot of it changes rapidly. Tools, articles, information for feeling more comfortable with your own website. @MarcKneepkens
Curated by Marc Kneepkens
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A Non-Designer's Guide to Creating Engaging Images for Social Media

A Non-Designer's Guide to Creating Engaging Images for Social Media | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
Learn how to create engaging images for all of your social media pages and profiles - no previous design skills necessary!

A great social media marketer today and an awesome advertiser in the 1960s have much in common.

David Ogilvy, the father of advertising, was famous for spending an inordinate amount of time on headlines. Why? Because that’s the line that people read the most, so it mattered a lot.

Ogilvy was a master at stuff like this — prioritizing what was really important.

If he lived through the age of social media, I’m fairly certain Ogilvy would say something like:

On the average, many more people engage with images as read the copy in social media posts. When you have crafted your social media image, you have spent eighty cents out of your dollar.

Images have never been more important in social. They’re the key to driving greater online engagement, much like a great headline in advertising.

The only issue here is that if, like me, you aren’t über-skilled in graphic design, creating eye-catching engaging images can be difficult. So how can non-designers like me still create incredible images for social media? One way is by learning simple, repeatable design principles.

Here are 3 key design principles that will help you create engaging social images every time! Read more: click image or title.

 

FREE Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km

 


Via Kamal Bennani, Jesús Hernández
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Learning to be clear with #colors and #fonts.

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Unisoft Informatics System's curator insight, May 3, 8:31 AM
Its very necessary to create engaging images while sharing any update on social media, as it is the first thing visitors see and decide whether to click on the post or not. At the same time not all social media experts are good enough with designing tools, but non - designers social media experts too can create engaging image. Wanna know how? Read here..
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5 Helpful Pre-Launch Resources for Online Startups

5 Helpful Pre-Launch Resources for Online Startups | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
Generating buzz for your company in the beginning is a make-or-break task.

Many startups have failed over the years, and a horrible product or service isn’t always to blame -- it’s often because nobody knew the product or service existed. Attracting users early on, either during the pre-launch beta or on the actual launch date is great for two things: feedback and revenue.

While creating an early buzz and attracting a user base can be difficult, there are many tools that can help, including the five listed below. Read more: click title or image.




Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.l/1aKy7km
Growthink, Inc. daily article emails and newsletter are furthering my business education...better than any business school. Keeps me excited about growing and expanding my business. Education+Inspiration+Motivation+Innovation = Success. Thanks Dave for helping me to create my own "formula" for success/profit.
Teri Bergstrom

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Get that advantage with some of these tips.

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50 Surprising Tips for Getting Attention in Mass Media | Jeff Bullas

50 Surprising Tips for Getting Attention in Mass Media | Jeff Bullas | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Have we been so distracted by social media that we have forgotten “the media” in our marketing efforts?

Ranking on the web helps grow awareness and attracts eventual sales. Great services and products

supply solutions for consumers, but getting free attention in a national newspaper, a magazine and mass media can be a very effective marketing tactic.

Press outreach and mass media attention is often a problem for many businesses.

Below, you’ll find a long list of solutions to help you establish, improve, and solidify your outreach capabilities.

The pursuit of sales will never cease, but ensure media attention is never a problem. Here are some tips for getting attention in mass media.

  1. Be the purple cow. If you’re not different, there’s no reason for editors and publications to cover you.
  2. National coverage is great but hard to get.  Align a story with local or regional news, events, or concerns.
  3. Identify quirky components of your company (logo), CEO (hobby), or company culture (You don’t work on Fridays).
  4. Maintain an excel sheet of sites pitched and reporter contact information.  Keep notes and dates (so you don’t re-pitch!)
  5. Find reporters on Twitter and use AllMyTweets to identify topics they like, dislike, etc.
  6. Research prior works of individual reporters, not just topics reported.
  7. Use this tool to find any person’s email.
  8. Read reporters’ articles, blogs, and tweets.  Mention their work and create a greater sense of context and logic regarding the reason for initial contact.
  9. Do not use reporters’ personal emails unless indicated it is preferred.
  10. Comment on reporters’ posts and personal blogs.
  11. Use visual platforms like Pinterest and Google Plus to find information related to hobbies, trips, pets, favorite locations, etc.
  12. Hire a content writer or PR person to write your outreach emails.  Emotional intelligence is a skill set!
  13. As with writing great post titles, spend time on the subject line of the email.  You want them to be excited to open it.
  14. Don’t include attachments; cut and paste material in the email itself.
  15. Set Google Alerts for key terms, so you can stay informed about stories the reporters think are important.
  16. Set Alerts for names of editors and reporters too to see what they’re writing about (Share their work too!)
  17. Spend time on your email signature; editors and reporters want information coming from authority sources.
  18. Be ready for phone contact; some rather ask directly than email back and forth.  Indicate you are available for phone contact.
  19. Be humble and genuine; admit what you don’t know rather than fake it.  Reporters keep ongoing contact lists, but if you waste their time, you’ll never get a chance with them (or their outlet) again.
  20. You’re supplying information but editors are well aware of the benefit of news coverage.  Thank them for their time and for (even) considering your input.
  21. Send a follow-up thanks.  Use a funny graphic of something they will appreciate (since you used AllMyTweets, Google Plus, Pinterest, etc, to see what they like) to be ‘purple.’
  22. Don’t play politician and satisfy all sides of a story.  Have a strong and passionate opinion – stick to it.
  23. It’s not a one-night stand.  Reporters contact the same people.  (How many (New York) times has Danny Sullivan contributed to major stories?)
  24. DO NOT USE TEMPLATES.  Work with your outreach team to create a successful email formula, but ensure the email to each editor/reporter is unique.  Reporters sniff-out templates.
  25. Interested reporters may do homework on you.  Update your ‘about’ page and social media profiles to reflect the expertise they’re looking for – But remember to be genuine!
  26. Provide multiple opportunities for contact – include work email, cell phone, business phone, Skype, Twitter handle, etc.
  27. To build social authority, take screenshots when people compliment posts, your company, or your personality, and insert on your ‘about’ page, business’ homepage, etc.
  28. Be active in forums and industry-specific question-and-answer platforms.  It adds ‘tangible’ evidence regarding your expertise and helpful nature.
  29. Create Twitter lists of editors and reporters and stay informed of their interests regarding developing news and stories.
  30. Subscribe to HARO and Profnet, platforms where reporters actively seek help.
  31. Don’t get creepy, liking reporters’ family pictures on Facebook or being too friendly on social platforms.  Be personable but keep professional.
  32. Use social media ads to ‘target’ media outlets by genre, key terms, etc.  It helps reporters and editors grow aware of your company, contributions, expertise, etc.
  33. Peruse news sites, looking for broken links, awkward plug-ins, etc.  Provide technical help or refer them to someone who can.
  34. Create an ongoing folder of stats.  At times, reporters can’t use quotes or direct information yet need stat graphics to supplement articles. (You’ll still get credit!)
  35. Conduct industry surveys, becoming a mini reporter.  You’ll have more information to offer major publications and reporters.
  36. Getting one’s first major dose of coverage is like making your first million; it’s the hardest.  Create a ‘Media’ section on your website, showing reporters you’ve ‘done this before.’
  37. Create a separate online page, featuring your resume, mentioning previous speaking engagements, awards, and so on.
  38. When used for a story or article, become a marketer for them.  Help spread the news!
  39. Later, when writing internal posts or guest posts, link to the reporter’s story, building links to the site and story.  The added marketing effort will be appreciated.
  40. Don’t tell Cutts, but guest blogging is a great way to show reporters you’re a ‘giver,’ offering insight on digital properties of others.
  41. Be a great assistant; maybe you can’t help with a particular story, but you may know a friend who can.  Reporters will remember your help (and it’s likely your friend will think you’re swell too!)
  42. Regularly link to journalists’ stories in your businesses posts, maintaining indirect relationships and expressing interest in their craft.
  43. When appropriate, mention previous coverage from news sources in the initial email.  As mentioned, reporters want ‘seasoned’ contributors.
  44. Handwrite a ‘thank you’ card and mail it to the reporter.  In the ‘digital’ age, snail mail is ‘purple,’ and usually requires more time and effort.
  45. Mention the reporter’s ‘audience,’ and how your information will help deliver valuable news.
  46. Be unique but not off topic.  Don’t use obscure or outlandish information to seem interesting.  If it’s too far out there, you’ll appear strange rather than intriguing.
  47. Don’t sound like a press release that sucks. Some are so boring, with a ‘look how great we are’ sentiment.  EVERY company wants press but not all know how to intrigue the masses.
  48. Be a giver and not (just) a taker.
  49. Have a professional writer edit emails, checking for grammatical errors and awkward phrases.  Reporters are not English teachers, but they make a living reporting (often writing) the news.  Expect them to notice your errors.
  50. Be who you say you are and do what you say you’ll do.

Author Bio: Mr. Secore enjoys others calling him “Mr.,” but loves helping other entrepreneurs get started on the right footing even more and ypiu will find him hanging out at Reviewpon. If you prefer to be on first-name basis with Cam, follow his Twitter handle and engage with him online – he really enjoys that!



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km




Via Jeff Domansky
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Good advice from a media expert. Media will give you leverage and credibility in every aspect of your business.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 7, 2014 12:58 AM

Practical starting starting for media relations for business. Useful tips, helpful hints and actionable tactics.

Tackk's curator insight, August 7, 2014 2:30 PM

Many small tips go a long way.

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Social Media: Financial Services That Tweet

Social Media: Financial Services That Tweet | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
When it comes to social media financial services have been slow to join Twitter. These banks are growing their follower base fast with these tricks.

Celebrities aren’t the only ones who tweet. Twitter gets results in the form of social media followers for banks and financial services. How?  They  use it to launch products, enhance communications, and improve customer service.

When it comes to social media, financial services are often accused of missing the boat on Twitter,  or giving up after some half-hearted effort. Bad move. Here’s a look at some banks heading in the right direction  through multiple forms of customer engagement.

To read the full article, click on the title or image.



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km


Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Definitely something to learn here. Banks have the funds and make these choices. Check it out, good article.

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In defense of the niche: content marketing and the rise of the smart web

In defense of the niche: content marketing and the rise of the smart web | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Author and entrepreneur Seth Godin once said that “Marketing is no longer about the stuff that you make, but about the stories you tell.” Even for those folks who’ve never so much as heard of lead-gen or nurture programs,

the importance of relevant content and compelling narrative has never been so necessary as it is today — especially because the digital sea is brimming with the wreckage of too many voices with far too little exposure.

That doesn’t seem to stop the superfluousness from spreading, though, and quickly drowning out a lot of the more substantial content that arguably deserves a bigger platform. The Internet is a minefield, and discovering anything worthwhile is often an accident (which is, of course, why the content curation movement started up in the first place).

But what is it, exactly, that makes content more globally valuable, shareable, accepted, meaningful, or engaging?


To read the full article, click on the title.


Get your Free Business Plan Template here:

https://growthink.infusionsoft.com/go/freebptemplate/gt4045/
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 14, 2013 8:29 PM

Directly from the Scoop.it Blog.

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Welcome to hell: Apple vs Google vs Facebook and the slow death of the web | The Verge

So let's talk about ad blocking.

You might think the conversation about ad blocking is about the user experience of news, but what we're really talking about is money and power in Silicon Valley. And titanic battles between large companies with lots of money and power tend to have a lot of collateral damage.

iOS 9 came out yesterday (in fits and starts) and with it, support for content blockers in iOS 9. There is already a little cottage industry of ad blockers available, and you should definitely try one or two — they will radically improve your mobile web experience, because they will... block huge chunks of the web from loading.

what we're really talking about is money and power in Silicon Valley

Those huge chunks — the ads! — are almost certainly the part you don't want. What you want is the content, hot sticky content, snaking its way around your body and mainlining itself directly into your brain. Plug that RSS firehose straight into your optic nerve and surf surf surf 'til you die.

Unfortunately, the ads pay for all that content, an uneasy compromise between the real cost of media production and the prices consumers are willing to pay that has existed since the first human scratched the first antelope on a wall somewhere. Media has always compromised user experience for advertising: that's why magazine stories are abruptly continued on page 96, and why 30-minute sitcoms are really just 22 minutes long. Media companies put advertising in the path of your attention, and those interruptions are a valuable product. Your attention is a valuable product. Read more: click image or title.



Learn more about funding, find great funding sources, get a free business plan template, post your funding request for free, and more:

www.Business-Funding-Insider.com

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

The battle of the titans. Find out what's really going on with the big #tech companies, what creates their income and how they fight their war.

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10 Digital Hacks Every Marketer Should Know

I've spent the last 10 years discovering the best digital marketing hacks to move the awareness and revenue needle. I'm giving you 3 examples and 10 hacks to improve your marketing game dramatically.


When professional marketers show their tricks, you better pay attention! Great Slideshare.


Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km




Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, malek
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Jerome Pernollet's curator insight, October 28, 2014 4:07 AM

Éveillez vous aux DIGITAL HACKS

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4 Easy Ways for Startups to Get Media Coverage

4 Easy Ways for Startups to Get Media Coverage | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
No PR budget? No problem.

For many startups, getting media coverage is like searching for the Holy Grail, especially in the early stages. Even worse, seeking coverage can be an incredibly time-consuming task that could keep you from focusing on your product or your customers.

That's why doing it right is an important skill, one that can make a huge difference in a company's success or failure. Since I sit on the other side of this particular table, I turned to Clément Delangue, the head of marketing at mention and the author of the SlideShare presentation: "Get Media Coverage for Startups--Newsjacking 101."

Clément has managed to get mention covered in most major publications (including my list of Powerful Social Media Marketing Tools for Savvy Businesses.)

According to Clément, here re the four easiest ways to get media coverage:

To read the full article, click on the title or image.



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km


Marc Kneepkens's insight:

First one: "Newsjack your competitior". This article has some great and realistic ideas. Read it if you want more media coverage.

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10 Reasons Why You Ignore Google+ At YOUR Peril

10 Reasons Why You Ignore Google+ At YOUR Peril | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Why should you use Google+?There are lots of good reasons to pay attention to Google+, but for me it comes down to these three:

  • Search is becoming social
  • Google+ Authorship is becoming a filter for quality content
  • Google+ has the best user experience of any social network

Visit the link (title)to find additional insights, resource links, and useful Google+ information.


Get your Free Business Plan Template here:

http://bit.ly/1aKy7km




Via Lauren Moss, Martin (Marty) Smith
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Protecting content and getting benefits of authorship become more important. Here's some good information.

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Carlos Bisbal's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:28 AM

3 razones de peso por las que ya no puedes permitirte ignorar Google+

Read more at http://www.business2community.com/google-plus/3-compelling-reasons-can-longer-afford-ignore-google-0670455#Ftf3MlKpJUWRfKTL.99

Hanin Abu Al Rub's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:56 AM

I believe so...

Jim Doyle's curator insight, December 6, 2013 1:13 AM
3 Compelling Reasons Why You Can No Longer Afford to Ignore Google+