Internet Presence
Follow
Find tag "eCitizen"
11.6K views | +1 today
Internet Presence
Creating your own website is challenging. There is too much information, and a lot of it changes rapidly. Tools, articles, information for feeling more comfortable with your own website. @MarcKneepkens
Curated by Marc Kneepkens
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Marc Kneepkens from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

How to Create Awesome Infographics Without Being a Designer

How to Create Awesome Infographics Without Being a Designer | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Well, I’m here to tell you that it’s definitely possible to create some awesome infographics in any category that you choose, EVEN if you’re not a designer. In this blog post, I’m going to introduce you to three awesome tools to create the best infographics, tell you how to use them AND how you can share your infographics in different channels all over the web. So, let’s get started!..


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Infographics



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.l/1aKy7km

Hey Dave,
Your BP template help me achieve the goals I've been trying for 5 years. The template led me to produce an effective tool to attract the investors I need.
Thanks
Robert



Via Jeff Domansky, Gust MEES, Official AndreasCY
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Creating a nice #infographic is a skill that will please your visitors. It is also something that easily gets shared. Take advantage of this.

more...
Well Connected Mom's curator insight, April 10, 4:11 PM

Infographics makes statistics visually interesting and more palatable.

judyhaar's curator insight, April 20, 1:19 PM

Info graphics are the norm. Get onboard!

Daniel de Lisle's curator insight, April 23, 5:05 PM

New to infographics and want to get a handle on how to make complex data speak to your clients then read on.

Rescooped by Marc Kneepkens from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Why an Internet “slow lane” is a terrible idea | Net Neutrality

Why an Internet “slow lane” is a terrible idea |  Net Neutrality | Internet Presence | Scoop.it



As the Federal Communications Commission unveils its “Open Internet” proposal, Clay Shirky explains the regulation, politicking and jargon.

All eyes are on the Federal Communications Commission, as commissioner Tom Wheeler unveiled the FCC’s plan for “Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet.” The plan has had many Internet-centric companies up in arms, decrying any plan that might create a two-tiered Internet comprising “fast lanes” for companies that can pay, and “slow lanes” for those that don’t. (See an open letter to the FCC signed by companies including Amazon, Google and Microsoft.) It’s a complicated topic that involves regulation, politicking and jargon, so we called on technology writer and observer Clay Shirky to share his take on what’s going on. An edited version of our conversation follows.

To read the full article, click on the title.



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km


Via Gust MEES
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Clarity in the 'net neutrality' issue. This article explains the details in plain English.

more...
Rescooped by Marc Kneepkens from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How to Delete Yourself from the Internet [Infographic]

How to Delete Yourself from the Internet [Infographic] | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
Ready to erase your tracks and disappear online, once and for all? This infographic from Who Is Hosting This reveals the nine steps you need to take to remove your personal information collected all over the web.

Many of the steps are ones we've mentioned in our own guide on the subject, from deactivating online accounts to getting yourself off of data collection lists. It also offers a few more suggestions, such as falsifying your account information for those horrendous accounts you can't delete and making sure your phone company doesn't have you listed as well. Of course, if you don't want to completely disappear from the web, you can just pick and choose which steps to do to protect your privacy and personal information.


Via Gust MEES
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

It's amazing how much information is out there about you. Have you ever Googled yourself?

There may be many reasons for 'deleting' your online presence, or parts of it. This is good information.

more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, March 7, 2014 11:21 AM


Very interesting...


Carol Rine's curator insight, March 8, 2014 9:18 AM

How to Disappear Online !

Vilma Galstaun's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:50 PM

Some sites to be aware of where you have an online presence.

Rescooped by Marc Kneepkens from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Teaching Respect for Other People’s Content in the Internet Age | Digital Citizenship

Teaching Respect for Other People’s Content in the Internet Age | Digital Citizenship | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
As we enter National Cyber Security Awareness Month, it's the perfect time for all of us to discuss respect for other people's content online.


Tom Galvin is the Executive Director of the Digital Citizens Alliance.

Let’s face it: kids these days are incredibly tech-savvy – they spend an average of seven-and-a-half hours per day consuming some form of media, much of it online. But just because children are voracious content consumers doesn’t mean they’re always able to tell good content from bad content – and it doesn’t guarantee they understand how to use content they find on the Internet appropriately.

As we enter National Cyber Security Awareness Month, it is the perfect time for all of us to discuss this issue with children, parents, and educations – what more can we do to keep content safe and what are the stakes if we don’t.

Online Piracy and Content Abuse

With kids spending so much time interacting with online content, they are more likely to be exposed to stolen content in the form of pirated movies, music, and games that are offered up to unsuspecting youth as “free” downloads.

The sites that offer these so-called free downloads are usually only able to do so because they have stolen or misappropriated the content in the first place. The online criminals behind these sites then rake in millions by placing legitimate advertisements to make their sites appear more reputable. You can learn more about that in the Digital Citizens Alliance’s study, Good Money Gone Bad.

The Risks of Engaging with Stolen Content

To start, downloading pirated music, movies, or TV shows is illegal. You wouldn’t allow your kids to walk into a Best Buy, slip a DVD in their coat, and walk out without paying – so why should it be any different when the content in question is online?

While it may be illegal, it is also far too common. A new Digital Citizens Alliance poll shows that 62 percent said they didn’t always check or weren’t sure if movies, music, games, or books they downloaded were legally authorized. Previous Digital Citizens Alliance research has shown this is a widely used delivery mechanism for malware.

Aside from the moral implications, downloading stolen content can also expose children and their families to a wide array of online crimes. The criminals behind these sites often use the “free” content they are offering as a Trojan Horse to lure unwitting victims. Once downloaded, you, your child, and your family could be exposed to anything from malware that targets your computer to identity theft.

That “free” download is probably looking a little more costly now, isn’t it?

Showing and Teaching Content Respect

Content respect isn’t just limited to not downloading stolen music, movies, or TV shows; it also means teaching kids how to appropriately use the content they find online. Nowhere is this more important than in the context of their education.
Kids today are used to finding whatever they need to complete an assignment online. The information they find on the Internet is so ubiquitous, that it’s easy for them to think of the content they find online as up for grabs. That’s where another form of content abuse comes into play – online plagiarism.

When we talk about online plagiarism, it’s also important to understand that it’s not just other people’s writing that is being misused and abused. Kids aren’t just writing reports these days; they’re creating multimedia presentations, videos, infographics, and more. Using someone else’s creations without properly crediting their work – whether it is someone’s writing, art, music, or even just their ideas – is plagiarism, plain and simple.

What We Can and Should Do

Content abuse is an action that can embolden perpetrators to go onto bigger, bolder, and more insidious activities. We can’t put our heads in the sand. Just because we haven’t cracked down on it yet doesn’t mean we should ignore it forever. In fact, there is no better time than now to do something about it.

As responsible adults, it’s up to us to ensure children understand the difference between referencing someone else’s content with proper attribution and outright stealing or plagiarizing that content. It’s a thin, but very important line. Unchecked, stealing others work creates a culture of content abuse. When young people see there is no penalty for stealing movies and other content, they can get into committing other, more high-risk online crimes. 

Teaching kids the difference between good and bad content – as well as how to appropriately use the content they find online – should be a goal for all parents and responsible adults. Learn what we’re doing at the Digital Citizens Alliance to make the Internet a safer, more respectful place for ever

Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/


Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km



Via ICTPHMS, Gust MEES
more...
Tony Guzman's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:32 PM

This blog article shares some great insights into how to best train our youth (and adults) about proper online content use and downloading.

christian campos's curator insight, February 15, 9:37 PM

This article does what the title says. its shows how we as users should have respect for other peoples content and how we sometimes don't acknowledge when we are getting a form of media illegally. I Agree with the article stating that sometimes downloads can result in "trojans", therefore exposing your computer to a harmful virus. Kids and digital immigrants would most likely fall into these traps due to  the unfamiliarity  of these downloads or websites.

Rescooped by Marc Kneepkens from Venture Capital Stories
Scoop.it!

Governments, The Web and Surveillance

Governments, The Web and Surveillance | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
When the web became commonplace, the decision-makers ignored it, considering it irrelevant. As a result, freedom flourished online. People weren't just consuming content; they were creating it.

But, eventually, politicians and leaders realised how important the internet is. And they realised how useful the internet can be for other purposes — especially for surveillance of citizens. The two chief inventions of our generation — the internet and the mobile phone — changed the world. However, they both turned out to be perfect tools for the surveillance state. And in such a state, everybody is assumed guilty.

US intelligence agencies have a full legal right to monitor foreigners — and most of us are foreigners to the Americans. So when we use US-based services, we are under surveillance — and most of the services we use are US-based.

Advancements in computing power and data storage have made wholesale surveillance possible. But they've also made leaking possible, which will keep organisations worrying about getting caught over any wrongdoing. The future of the web is hanging in the balance between parties that want to keep us under surveillance and parties that want to reveal the nature of such surveillance. Both parties have the data revolution on their side.

While governments are watching over us, they know we're watching over them.



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km




Via Gust MEES, Marc Kneepkens
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.

more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:53 PM


Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=ANT

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Privacy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=NSA

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet?tag=Infographic

 

Looks like George ORWELL was right...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Brother_(Nineteen_Eighty-Four)

 

Forget PRISM, the recent NSA leaks are plain: Digital privacy doesn’t exist...


Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:12 PM

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.