Internet Presence
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Internet Presence
Creating your own website is challenging. There is too much information, and a lot of it changes rapidly. Tools, articles, information for feeling more comfortable with your own website. @MarcKneepkens
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Use Public Wifi? Here’s Why Snooping On You is Way Easier Than You Think

Use Public Wifi? Here’s Why Snooping On You is Way Easier Than You Think | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Hacking is so easy these days, even non-hackers can do it. Some kinds of hacking, that is.

Like public wifi, for example. To spy on people’s Internet browsing while they’re sipping a cup of brew, you don’t need to be a pro. Thanks to freely available online software, you barely need to know anything about coding.

I tell you this not to encourage you to start snooping around at coffee shops and airports. But so you’ll be better aware of the need to protect yourself against shady characters that do that sort of thing. Because the barrier to entry is not high.

In the same way that tools like Blogger and WordPress made it easy for anyone to have a good-looking blog without knowing a stitch of code, freely downloadable “sniffing” software has made it easy for anyone to be able to hack into someone’s wifi session and see what they’re surfing.

These software tools are actually meant for IT administrators to troubleshoot network problems. But like everything, they can be used for good or for evil. Read more: click image or title.

 

 

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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Use a #VPN :  In countries where you can't use Skype or get to certain websites. Now it's even more important for #security and #financial transactions. Highly recommended and very user friendly. Here is an excellent one:  http://bit.ly/1Qc6Tvk

It works great, many servers all over the world, includes speed tests to find the fastest one for you, and wonderful customer service. One fee includes several devices.

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How to Stop Hackers from Stealing Your Data on Public Wi-Fi

How to Stop Hackers from Stealing Your Data on Public Wi-Fi | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

You enjoy “free internet” through Wi-Fi hotspots libraries, coffee shops, at bars, and other public places. It seems harmless. Little do you know, a stranger could know your birthplace, the schools you attended, and your recent search history in 20 minutes.

Just a couple of years ago, strangers could login as you on Facebook if you were on the same Wi-Fi network as them. They’d be able to view and send messages from your account, and even post statuses.

You don’t have to swear off public Wi-Fi for the rest of your life, and it’s not entirely the venue’s fault. Instead, let’s figure out why public Wi-Fi is so attractive to hackers and explore how they steal your information. We’ll share a simple solution that protects you from the vast majority of hackers’ strategies and tactics. Read more: click image or title.





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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Protect yourself. Start by understanding how vulnerable you are. VPN's are great for security.

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Sen. Wyden: NSA tech spying hurts economy

Sen. Wyden: NSA tech spying hurts economy | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Google Chairman Eric Schmidt and other Silicon Valley executives say controversial government spying programs are undercutting the Internet economy and want Congress to step up stalled reform.

"We're going to end up breaking the Internet," warned Google Inc.'s Schmidt during a public forum Wednesday convened by U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who has been an outspoken critic of electronic data-gathering by the National Security Agency. Schmidt and executives from Facebook Inc, Microsoft Corp. and other firms say revelations of extensive NSA surveillance are prompting governments in Europe and elsewhere to consider laws requiring that their citizens' online data be stored within their national borders.

Rules like that would drive up costs and create technical obstacles to the way the Internet currently operates, making it "profoundly difficult in terms of our ability to deliver services," said Facebook general counsel Colin Stretch. Brad Smith, general counsel for Microsoft, said some European customers are worried their data will be more vulnerable to U.S. government snooping, although he declined to give specific examples.

"The reality is this is a real problem for American tech companies," said Smith. "If trust falls, then the prospects for business are hurt."

Wyden, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee and chairman of the Finance Committee, convened the roundtable in the Palo Alto High School gym, where he played basketball as a student in the 1960s. He said he will take the executives' message back to Washington, where bills to curb surveillance have stalled. Prospects for passing a reform bill this fall are shrinking, Wyden told The Associated Press.

"I'm going to my best to use this. What I'm going to do is say there's a clear and present danger to the Internet economy," Wyden said.

Wyden contends that the government's "digital dragnet" of phone calls, emails and online communications doesn't make the country safer, and only hurts the U.S. economy.

"When the actions of a foreign government threaten red-white-and-blue jobs, Washington gets up at arms. But, even today, almost no one in Washington is talking about how overly broad surveillance is hurting the U.S. economy," he said in opening remarks.

Microsoft's Smith acknowledged that concerns over recent terrorist incidents in the Middle East may have undercut some public support for surveillance reform. But we "need to resolve that we won't let danger freeze this country in its tracks," he said, adding that "antiquated laws will not keep this country safe. They will undermine fundamental respect for law enforcement."

When former NSA contractor Edward Snowden made details of NSA surveillance tactics public, tech executives and industry experts warned that consumers and business customers would fear that U.S. technology companies can't protect sensitive data from government prying. Some analysts estimated last year that U.S. tech companies could lose tens of billions of dollars in sales, particularly after European firms began marketing themselves as being more secure than U.S. competitors — or less vulnerable to legal demands from the U.S. government.

Most of the impact has been anecdotal, however. A few companies, including Cisco Systems Inc. and Qualcomm Inc., have said they believe they lost some deals in China and other emerging markets because of concerns about U.S. spying. Germany did cancel a contract with Verizon this summer, citing a fear that it may provide customer phone records to the NSA. Some tech startups and telecommunications companies in France and Switzerland have claimed an increase in sales to customers who are wary of U.S. providers.

It's difficult to quantify the losses because "companies don't always know about the deals that they weren't invited to be a part of," said Daniel Castro, a senior analyst at the nonprofit Information Technology and Innovation Foundation in Washington, D.C. Castro estimated last year that losses to U.S. tech companies could amount to $35 billion by 2016. He said this week his estimate is still valid.

Wyden has called for strict controls on the NSA and complains that a pending reform bill, authored by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., doesn't go far enough to restrict so-called "back-door" or warrantless searches of emails and online communications by Americans. The Obama administration has endorsed the Leahy bill, while defending government surveillance programs as narrowly defined and necessary for tracking foreign terrorist suspects. Wyden is backing separate legislation that would increase the authority of the government's new Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board.

A coalition of leading online companies including Google, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft continue to urge Congress to pass reform. The companies also have beefed up their own security measures, through encryption and other methods intended to rebuff snooping by individual hackers — or government agencies.

That's put Silicon Valley at odds with federal authorities. Attorney General Eric Holder, who announced last month that he is leaving the Justice Department, has complained that recent encryption moves by Apple Inc. and Google could hinder vital law enforcement investigations.


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What Happens to Your Online Presence When You Die? [Infographic]

What Happens to Your Online Presence When You Die? [Infographic] | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
What happens to your data when you die? In its first eight years of existence, an estimated 30 million Facebook users passed away, leaving behind their pages and all of their data. While Facebook now offers to memorialize pages of users who have passed away, there is still a time period in which deceased users …

To read the full article, click on the title or image.




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Via malek
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Interesting topic. Definitely something to look at.

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Tomas Trejbal's curator insight, June 27, 2014 3:03 AM

30 milion facebook users died in the first 8 years of its existence... 

dianasdaily's curator insight, June 28, 2014 12:54 AM

This infographic has all the answers to the questions about what will happen with your data when you die!

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 28, 2014 1:06 PM

So glad to find this infographic on a very serious topic for me.  Since 2007, my business and employment endeavors have been work at home projects.  Often wonder what will happen to these projects when I no longer wake up each day to maintain them.

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How to Create a Great Startup Blog and Stand Out from Competition - The Next Web

How to Create a Great Startup Blog and Stand Out from Competition - The Next Web | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

How to Create a Great Startup Blog and Stand Out from Competition -
The Next Web
Beside giving your startup a platform, having a blog can help you establish thought leadership, build SEO, and promote things that central to your brand's messaging.

Blogging is like the modern day welcome mat, showing passers-by that someone is home and will probably answer the doorbell if you ring it.

For startups, this is particularly important as you strive to establish your voice and brand point of view. Beside giving your startup a platform, having a blog can help you establish thought leadership, build SEO, and promote things that central to your brand’s messaging.

But not all corporate blogs are created equal. When it comes to starting a blog, there are a few basic parameters to consider.

To read the full article, click on the title.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Your Blog connects you with your public. The better information you provide, the more you will be respected, listened to, and considered an authority in what you do. Whether that information is original or curated and shared, that's not important. You're the place to go to where that information can be found.

Good article.


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Mark Zuckerberg Announces Ambitious 'Rough Plan' To Get 5 Billion More People Onto The Internet

Mark Zuckerberg Announces Ambitious 'Rough Plan' To Get 5 Billion More People Onto The Internet | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg's Hyperloop.


CEO Mark Zuckerberg has put forth what he calls a "rough plan" to bring the internet to the next 5 billion people (there are currently 2.7 billion people online, or roughly a third of the world's population).

The announcement has a slightly hyperloopy feel to it, as it's a little bit unclear on how the plan would be executed. But it's a blueprint that's extremely important to Facebook


To read the full article, click on the title.


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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great Minds think big. Delivering data more efficiently and providing internet for free tho those who can't afford it sounds great. Let the big money figure it out, companies like Facebook are positioned to do it.

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How to see all the companies tracking you on Facebook — and block them

How to see all the companies tracking you on Facebook — and block them | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
If you're using Facebook, you're giving the company a ton of information about yourself, which it is selling to advertisers in one form or another.

Facebook is a great utility if you want to stay in touch with friends and family, share photos, and see what other people are up to in their lives.

It's free, of course, but that doesn't mean it comes without a price. If you're using Facebook, you're giving the company a ton of information about yourself which it is selling to advertisers in one form or another.

Most people forget that when they download an app or sign-in to a website using their Facebook login, they're giving those companies a look into their Facebook profiles. Your profile contains a lot of personal information that can often include your email address and phone number, but frequently also your work history and your current location. And most people don't realise that if you're sharing any of that data with your friends then apps used by those friends can see that data too!

Advertisers, Facebook app developers, and Facebook ad tech partners don't get a direct look at your personal data. They won't see that my name is Jim Edwards, my phone number is 07xxxx, I'm male, and I work at Business Insider — Facebook hashes and anonymises all the data to protect user's privacy and gives it back to partners in bulk so they can't identify individuals — but nevertheless, this data is being used in order to serve you better-targeted ads.


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Via massimo facchinetti
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great info to check once in a while. Some of this may be surprising.

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Jayne Courts's curator insight, August 14, 2015 7:56 AM

This is VERY important to protect your privacy. You never know who is watching you!!

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Kill the Password: Why a String of Characters Can't Protect Us Anymore | WIRED

Kill the Password: Why a String of Characters Can't Protect Us Anymore | WIRED | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

http://snip.ly/OD9z

You have a secret that can ruin your life. It’s not a well-kept secret, either. Just a simple string of characters—maybe six of them if you’re careless, 16 if you’re cautious—that can reveal everything about you.

Your email. Your bank account. Your address and credit card number. Photos of your kids or, worse, of yourself, naked. The precise location where you’re sitting right now as you read these words. Since the dawn of the information age, we’ve bought into the idea that a password, so long as it’s elaborate enough, is an adequate means of protecting all this precious data. But in 2012 that’s a fallacy, a fantasy, an outdated sales pitch. And anyone who still mouths it is a sucker—or someone who takes you for one.

No matter how complex, no matter how unique, your passwords can no longer protect you.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Read this article and find out how hackers get all of your information! Must-read!

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Hackers of the world unite as privacy startups answer Snowden’s call | Information Age

Hackers of the world unite as privacy startups answer Snowden’s call | Information Age | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

How the evolution of privacy startups is helping ordinary web users take back control of their data

Addressing the Hackers on Planet Earth (HOPE) conference over the weekend, Edward Snowden entreated hackers, engineers and activists to fight surveillance by building a new generation of privacy tools for everyone to use.

In fact, privacy startups are already hard at work building tools to help web users protect their privacy in areas such as analytics, encryption and search.

However, there is still much work to do to put these tools into the hands of the ordinary web user.

>See also: The big debate: do we need a privacy charter for the internet?

Since the NSA revelations last year, this task has continued to grow in significance as more and more privacy scares have grabbed the attention of the general public.

Earlier this month, for example, an employee of Germany's intelligence service was arrested on suspicion of spying for the US.

However, it’s not just the NSA that is the guilty party. Corporations such as Google and Facebook are also building treasure troves of personal information to share with others, often without user consent.

Emerging technology startups from around the world have responded to privacy concerns by building user-friendly products in three key areas: analytics, encryption and search.

- See more at: http://www.information-age.com/industry/start-ups/123458283/hackers-world-unite-privacy-startups-answer-snowdens-call#sthash.cOc1xyLN.dpuf


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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Privacy is becoming a very big issue. The public will not let government just call the shots.

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In the future, internet search will give us super powers

In the future, internet search will give us super powers | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Digital copies of the physical world may change the way we get information.

The days of internet searches being a matter of typing words into a box on a web page may be numbered.

Even the expressions "search it" and "Google it" could soon go out of fashion, just as "going online" is already passe because these days we're always connected.

Steven Weitz, senior director of search for Microsoft's search engine Bing wants our physical and virtual worlds to merge to a point where we will be able to stand on a street corner and the answer to "where am I?" will bring up not only the street name but historic and tourist information, places to eat as recommended by our friends and the best public transport option to get to an appointment on time.

To read the full article, click on the title.



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Via Charles Tiayon
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Competition in the online world hurls us forward into a new world. Information is the key. Startups come up with great ideas. They contribute to many different aspects of the new 'super powers'. Whether those are products and services for consumers or for business is not important. Keeping up with this evolution is exhilirating. What a ride!

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What Happens in an Internet Minute? #infographic

What Happens in an Internet Minute? #infographic | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, Marty Koenig
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Sunil Malhotra's curator insight, December 16, 2013 5:31 AM

Wow ... 1 minute!

IOANNIS APOSTOLOU's curator insight, December 16, 2013 9:26 AM

In time...the internet world!

aanve's curator insight, December 16, 2013 9:56 AM

Website Designing Company in Delhi-India,SEO Services Company Delhi

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How Big Data Is Transforming The Mobile Industry

How Big Data Is Transforming The Mobile Industry | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
As our personal and business lives migrate into mobile, there's virtually no end to big data applications.

The world is awash in data.

CIBC, a Canadian bank, predicts that information-generation growth will increase 50 times over the next decade. IDC, a market research firm, similarly forecasts a 44-fold increase in data volumes between 2009 and 2020. Mobile is playing a large part in driving this explosion in data.

Apple upended the electronics business six years ago with the release of the iPhone. The iPhone ushered in an era when design, both of software and hardware, became the paramount concept in the tech world.

Could data be the paradigm that anchors the next revolution? Many think so. 

In a recent report from BI Intelligence on Big Data and Mobile, we define big data, examine mobile's connection to it, analyze its potential, practical applications, and pitfalls, look at how it's collected, and answer some of the most frequently asked questions about big data and mobile.

Here's an overview of the relationship between big data and mobile:

  • First, big data needs to be defined:

To read the full article, click on the title

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Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis, Marc Kneepkens
Marc Kneepkens's insight:
Adapting is the norm know, mobile is changing the online world. Value will make the difference.
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, July 23, 2013 7:44 AM

Mobile is definitely changing the information landscape. Value will make the difference.