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Creating your own website is challenging. There is too much information, and a lot of it changes rapidly. Tools, articles, information for feeling more comfortable with your own website. @MarcKneepkens
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North Korea Loses Its Link to the Internet - NYTimes.com

North Korea Loses Its Link to the Internet - NYTimes.com | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

http://snip.ly/ZSXr

While perhaps a coincidence, the failure, which lasted about 10 hours, began after President Obama said the U.S. would respond to an act of “cybervandalism” against Sony Pictures.

A strange thing happened to North Korea’s already tenuous link to the Internet on Monday: It failed.
While perhaps a coincidence, the failure of the country’s computer connections began only hours after President Obama declared Friday that the United States would launch a “proportional response” to what he termed an act of “cybervandalism” against Sony Pictures.
Over the weekend, as North Korean officials demanded a “joint investigation” into the Sony attacks and denied culpability — an assertion the United States rejected — Internet service began to get wobbly. By early Monday, the Internet went as dark as one of those satellite photographs showing the impoverished country by night.


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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Most North Korean hackers are located outside of the country, see the end of the article.

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Kill the Password: Why a String of Characters Can't Protect Us Anymore | WIRED

Kill the Password: Why a String of Characters Can't Protect Us Anymore | WIRED | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

http://snip.ly/OD9z

You have a secret that can ruin your life. It’s not a well-kept secret, either. Just a simple string of characters—maybe six of them if you’re careless, 16 if you’re cautious—that can reveal everything about you.

Your email. Your bank account. Your address and credit card number. Photos of your kids or, worse, of yourself, naked. The precise location where you’re sitting right now as you read these words. Since the dawn of the information age, we’ve bought into the idea that a password, so long as it’s elaborate enough, is an adequate means of protecting all this precious data. But in 2012 that’s a fallacy, a fantasy, an outdated sales pitch. And anyone who still mouths it is a sucker—or someone who takes you for one.

No matter how complex, no matter how unique, your passwords can no longer protect you.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Read this article and find out how hackers get all of your information! Must-read!

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Governments, The Web and Surveillance

Governments, The Web and Surveillance | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
When the web became commonplace, the decision-makers ignored it, considering it irrelevant. As a result, freedom flourished online. People weren't just consuming content; they were creating it.

But, eventually, politicians and leaders realised how important the internet is. And they realised how useful the internet can be for other purposes — especially for surveillance of citizens. The two chief inventions of our generation — the internet and the mobile phone — changed the world. However, they both turned out to be perfect tools for the surveillance state. And in such a state, everybody is assumed guilty.

US intelligence agencies have a full legal right to monitor foreigners — and most of us are foreigners to the Americans. So when we use US-based services, we are under surveillance — and most of the services we use are US-based.

Advancements in computing power and data storage have made wholesale surveillance possible. But they've also made leaking possible, which will keep organisations worrying about getting caught over any wrongdoing. The future of the web is hanging in the balance between parties that want to keep us under surveillance and parties that want to reveal the nature of such surveillance. Both parties have the data revolution on their side.

While governments are watching over us, they know we're watching over them.



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Via Gust MEES, Marc Kneepkens
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:53 PM


Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=ANT

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Privacy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=NSA

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet?tag=Infographic

 

Looks like George ORWELL was right...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Brother_(Nineteen_Eighty-Four)

 

Forget PRISM, the recent NSA leaks are plain: Digital privacy doesn’t exist...


Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:12 PM

More complete information on the post we made here on http://www.scoop.it/t/internet-presence about agencies like the NSA spying through your webcam.


Also, check Gust Mees's insight in the comments with more articles and information. Thanks Gust.

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New to Mac? Four security tips you need to know

New to Mac? Four security tips you need to know | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

“The fundamental difference is that there are a LOT less malware threats and hacking attacks directed at Mac users than there are against Windows users.  Both can be attacked (and are), but normally it’s Windows users in the firing line. As I like to put it – I can get killed in Baghdad or Bournemouth.  

.


Neither is 100% safe, but one is definitely less risky than the other. Both OSes require up-to-date anti-virus, security patches, best practices and a good healthy serving of common sense to keep them out of trouble.”

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So while Mac OS X enjoys a deservedly good reputation for security, there are steps any user can take to protect themselves – against loss, password theft, and to protect your most important files.  Whether your shiny new Mac is for work – or for home – here’s how to get started.

To read the full article, click on the title.


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Via Gust MEES
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Good to get a more in depth explanation about Macs and security.

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North Korean Defector Jang Se Yul Trained With Hackers - Business Insider

North Korean Defector Jang Se Yul Trained With Hackers - Business Insider | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

http://snip.ly/XUZs

"The US shouldn’t take them lightly.”

Whether North Korea was responsible for the Sony hack or not, the consensus is that North Korea has some of the best hackers in the world.

There have been some reports recently about North Korea’s special cyber warfare unit, known as Bureau 121. The North Korean government has made grooming its “cyber warriors” a top priority for decades, and has given first class treatment to its hackers.

Jang Se-yul, a North Korean defector who now leads an organization called North Korea People’s Liberation Front in Seoul, could have been one of them. 



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Specially trained 'hacker' units from a rogue country!

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Teaching Respect for Other People’s Content in the Internet Age | Digital Citizenship

Teaching Respect for Other People’s Content in the Internet Age | Digital Citizenship | Internet Presence | Scoop.it
As we enter National Cyber Security Awareness Month, it's the perfect time for all of us to discuss respect for other people's content online.


Tom Galvin is the Executive Director of the Digital Citizens Alliance.

Let’s face it: kids these days are incredibly tech-savvy – they spend an average of seven-and-a-half hours per day consuming some form of media, much of it online. But just because children are voracious content consumers doesn’t mean they’re always able to tell good content from bad content – and it doesn’t guarantee they understand how to use content they find on the Internet appropriately.

As we enter National Cyber Security Awareness Month, it is the perfect time for all of us to discuss this issue with children, parents, and educations – what more can we do to keep content safe and what are the stakes if we don’t.

Online Piracy and Content Abuse

With kids spending so much time interacting with online content, they are more likely to be exposed to stolen content in the form of pirated movies, music, and games that are offered up to unsuspecting youth as “free” downloads.

The sites that offer these so-called free downloads are usually only able to do so because they have stolen or misappropriated the content in the first place. The online criminals behind these sites then rake in millions by placing legitimate advertisements to make their sites appear more reputable. You can learn more about that in the Digital Citizens Alliance’s study, Good Money Gone Bad.

The Risks of Engaging with Stolen Content

To start, downloading pirated music, movies, or TV shows is illegal. You wouldn’t allow your kids to walk into a Best Buy, slip a DVD in their coat, and walk out without paying – so why should it be any different when the content in question is online?

While it may be illegal, it is also far too common. A new Digital Citizens Alliance poll shows that 62 percent said they didn’t always check or weren’t sure if movies, music, games, or books they downloaded were legally authorized. Previous Digital Citizens Alliance research has shown this is a widely used delivery mechanism for malware.

Aside from the moral implications, downloading stolen content can also expose children and their families to a wide array of online crimes. The criminals behind these sites often use the “free” content they are offering as a Trojan Horse to lure unwitting victims. Once downloaded, you, your child, and your family could be exposed to anything from malware that targets your computer to identity theft.

That “free” download is probably looking a little more costly now, isn’t it?

Showing and Teaching Content Respect

Content respect isn’t just limited to not downloading stolen music, movies, or TV shows; it also means teaching kids how to appropriately use the content they find online. Nowhere is this more important than in the context of their education.
Kids today are used to finding whatever they need to complete an assignment online. The information they find on the Internet is so ubiquitous, that it’s easy for them to think of the content they find online as up for grabs. That’s where another form of content abuse comes into play – online plagiarism.

When we talk about online plagiarism, it’s also important to understand that it’s not just other people’s writing that is being misused and abused. Kids aren’t just writing reports these days; they’re creating multimedia presentations, videos, infographics, and more. Using someone else’s creations without properly crediting their work – whether it is someone’s writing, art, music, or even just their ideas – is plagiarism, plain and simple.

What We Can and Should Do

Content abuse is an action that can embolden perpetrators to go onto bigger, bolder, and more insidious activities. We can’t put our heads in the sand. Just because we haven’t cracked down on it yet doesn’t mean we should ignore it forever. In fact, there is no better time than now to do something about it.

As responsible adults, it’s up to us to ensure children understand the difference between referencing someone else’s content with proper attribution and outright stealing or plagiarizing that content. It’s a thin, but very important line. Unchecked, stealing others work creates a culture of content abuse. When young people see there is no penalty for stealing movies and other content, they can get into committing other, more high-risk online crimes. 

Teaching kids the difference between good and bad content – as well as how to appropriately use the content they find online – should be a goal for all parents and responsible adults. Learn what we’re doing at the Digital Citizens Alliance to make the Internet a safer, more respectful place for ever

Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/


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Tony Guzman's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:32 PM

This blog article shares some great insights into how to best train our youth (and adults) about proper online content use and downloading.

christian campos's curator insight, February 15, 9:37 PM

This article does what the title says. its shows how we as users should have respect for other peoples content and how we sometimes don't acknowledge when we are getting a form of media illegally. I Agree with the article stating that sometimes downloads can result in "trojans", therefore exposing your computer to a harmful virus. Kids and digital immigrants would most likely fall into these traps due to  the unfamiliarity  of these downloads or websites.

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How To Protect Your Business Info From Prying Eyes When Using Public WiFi

How To Protect Your Business Info From Prying Eyes When Using Public WiFi | Internet Presence | Scoop.it

I don’t know about you, but I love working from coffee shops. There is something about it that helps the creativity flow and I seem to be able to write better. From many entrepreneurs that I talk to feel the same way. It’s a great feeling to sit down with a nice Mocha and pump out some good content and complete tasks. But there is one HUGE risk when doing this…

With coffee shops, or anywhere else that offers free public WiFi, it is a perfect place for snoopers and hackers to take all of your files and info. For example, let’s say you jump on Facebook real quick to check out what’s happening… That username and password you just typed in, just went public. Meaning, anyone with the right program (which I am not going to talk about) could have just swiped your info. It’s crazy, but it really is that easy. The same goes for logging on via your tablet or smartphone. Public Hot Spots are NOT safe at all! So the question is, do we risk our privacy for convenience?

Well the good news is, you don’t have to! Your best solution for keeping your info safe while enjoying your local coffee shop is something called a VPN (Virtual Private Network). A VPN helps encrypt your data going through the WiFi. VPNs also provide other features besides just security, but I want to focus on the security aspect in this post.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



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Via Daniel Watson
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Yes! Highly recommended. I have used VPN's for years, living in emerging countries where Skype was blocked and many websites or social networks. Now we use it all the time, even in safe locations, especially when looking up financial accounts. I remember just recently accessing a credit card account, without having my VPN on. The next day this account was hacked. VPN's are a must.

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Ivan Garcia-Hidalgo's curator insight, February 27, 2014 9:41 AM

Want to stay safe while on public WiFi? Well consider using #VPN ---> How To Protect Your Business Info From Prying Eyes When Using Public WiFi #cybersecurity

Jim's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:33 AM

How often do we stop to log in to get an update on email or social media and figure "what's the risk?" In this case, it could be plenty.

eProAgi Anderson's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:34 AM

Get the Scoop on with public WiFi!