Internet of Things - Technology focus
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How to get around Uber's surge pricing

How to get around Uber's surge pricing | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Looking to get around Uber’s surge pricing? Simply walk a few blocks or wait a few minutes, researchers say. Users know that Uber’s surge pricing is in effect when ordering a car from their smartph...
Richard Platt's insight:

Looking to get around Uber’s surge pricing? Simply walk a few blocks or wait a few minutes, researchers say.  Users know that Uber’s surge pricing is in effect when ordering a car from their smartphone and their app reports: “Demand is off the charts! Fares have increased to get more Ubers on the road.”  But it doesn’t always work that way, according to researchers at Northeastern University who studied the car-hailing service in New York and San Francisco.  Some drivers purposely avoid surge-pricing areas on the assumption fewer customers will pay the higher rate.

The study also cited anecdotal evidence of “collusion.” That is when drivers in a specific area purposely go offline to set up a supply “shortage,” which in turn creates a price surge.  For customers, though, gaming the Uber algorithm is even easier. The study found 40 percent of surges last only five minutes, and 70 percent are over in 10. This means waiting is saving.  But for those short on time, a normal fare could be just a block away. New York, for example, has 16 surge areas — each with its own price, depending on customer demand inside any one area’s perimeter.

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96% Challenged by IoT Projects, 42% Targeting Consumers

96% Challenged by IoT Projects, 42% Targeting Consumers | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

But the success metrics are but one of the challenges of IoT implementation. Almost all (96%) of those involved in IoT projects say they face challenges in one form or another.

The challenges range from policies to issues with the actual technology. For any of you involved in IoT projects, this list of challenges from those already involved in IoT may sound familiar:

58% -- Business processes or policies, such as privacy issues
51% -- User adoption of new technology
41% -- Timely collection and analysis of data
40% -- Sensors or devices....


Via Jeff Domansky
Richard Platt's insight:

Only a third (33%) of those involved in IoT have quantifiable metrics to track success, according to the study IoT Meets Big Data and Analytics.  The study, conducted by Dimensional Research for ParStream, comprised an online survey of 200 businesspeople who have professional responsibility for IoT projects.   Almost half (47%) said their IoT initiatives were driven by strategic business investments and 42% are targeting consumers.  But the success metrics are still somewhat of a work in progress. Here’s how the success of IoT projects are evaluated:

  • 38% -- Objective is to explore options, so the process of learning will be the business success
  • 33% -- Have quantifiable metrics to track success
  • 29% -- Have documented goals, but they are difficult to quantify

But the success metrics are but one of the challenges of IoT implementation. Almost all (96%) of those involved in IoT projects say they face challenges in one form or another.  The challenges range from policies to issues with the actual technology. For any of you involved in IoT projects, this list of challenges from those already involved in IoT may sound familiar:

  • 58% -- Business processes or policies, such as privacy issues
  • 51% -- User adoption of new technology
  • 41% -- Timely collection and analysis of data
  • 40% -- Sensors or devices
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 28, 2015 2:29 PM

Challenges ahead for IOT, but market potential is irresistible if business can solve some of the potential problems.

YoloCommunications's curator insight, October 29, 2015 5:23 AM

Aside from IoT having a mystique to the term, why would this area be treated or approached any differently to any other new business proposition? After a business plan is developed, there should be a marketing strategy coupled with clear quantifiable metrics to gauge success and if those can be met then the prospects are extremely exciting.

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An Online Medical Database Is Reducing Doctor Error

An Online Medical Database Is Reducing Doctor Error | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Diagnostic errors burden providers, payers, and patients around the world. They lead to avoidable illness, suffering, and poor health outcomes and increase costs of care significantly. Access to evidence-based medical content at the point of care that answers clinical questions and ensures accuracy in diagnosis can reduce diagnostic errors and improve outcomes. Our organizations are involved in the efforts to expand global access. We encourage others to join us in this effort and offer three recommendations for accelerating this drive.

Via Giuseppe Fattori, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

Not really unexpected, but take heed businesses there are quite a few things that if made as a searchable, on-line database that one can reference to deal with complex / complicating processes that people have to deal with, this is the best option to help deal with the challenges.  It should come as no surprise to those who would benefit by such a searchable tool, and it helps to save lives too.

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Samsung's Galaxy View is an 18-inch tablet/TV you carry around like a briefcase

Samsung's Galaxy View is an 18-inch tablet/TV you carry around like a briefcase | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Samsung's Galaxy View is both a huge tablet and a tiny touchscreen TV. And it's got a handle.
Richard Platt's insight:

An interesting approach being made by Samsung.  "We wanted to rethink how you're consuming content and how you're accessing that content," Dennis Miloseski, the vice president of Samsung Design in America explained to me. "[The Galaxy View] is a product that's within arm's reach and gives you an experience like a 60-inch television." Miloseski's exaggerating, but it does feel like all of your movies and Android apps are bigger and more in-your-face than on a smaller tablet.  From the very moment you boot up the Galaxy View, it's clear what the device's main purpose is for: watching movies and TV shows. The grid-like homescreen shows shortcuts to all of your favorite video streaming content from Netflix to YouTube to Crackle. To get to the traditional Android homescreen of app icons, you swipe in from the right. "The homescreen is an entertainment-based experience; there is no remote — all you have to do is tap and you're into live television" Miloseski told me.

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Move over standing desk: this one reclines

Move over standing desk: this one reclines | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The $5,900 Altwork Station can morph from standup desk to full recliner - with keyboard and mouse that defy gravity - for those hardcore computer sessions.
Richard Platt's insight:

Let's just say that if Captain James T. Kirk had worked at a startup, this would be his desk.  Although designed primarily for hardcore computer coders, Altwork Station should prove a productive oasis for anyone who has to spend hours on end tethered to a desktop computer, says Altwork co-founder and CEO Che Voight.  “It you can use a tablet for your job then you’re not our audience, but everyone else is,” says Voight, whose company launched with a million-dollar-seed round led by North Bay Angels, which funds ventures north of Silicon Valley. He says Altwork hopes to begin hand-assembling and shipping product by spring, and will ramp up its Sonoma production facility based on demand.  Price of one Altwork Station:  $5,900

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Normal 3D Prints Totally Customized Earphones in As Little as 2 Days!

Not all ears are created equal. Which is why Normal, based in New York, decided to end the one-size-fits-all paradigm with a game-changing 3D printing concep...
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Great video explaining the way that a customized design, defined by the customer in the retail outlet, and then built by the manufacturing team using 3-D printers.  Interesting opportunities for entrepreneurs. 

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3D Printed TREK Bike Parts Using the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer

Engineers and designers at Trek Bicycle in Waterloo, Wisconsin, are famously obsessed with improving your ride. So it's no wonder that Trek's prototyping lab...
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Trek's prototyping lab was among the first to adopt the Objet®500 Connex3™, an advanced color multi-material 3D printer that runs on PolyJet technology. It creates prototypes that look and feel like production parts, with more material options and more up-time than ever before.  Engineers at Trek embraced the capability to integrate soft rubber-like components into models built from their favorite prototyping material, durable Digital ABS™. This is crucial because so many bike parts and accessories contain rigid and soft components. Before the lab would have had to build those devices in separate jobs, swapping out 3D printing materials in between, and then bond the components. Or, to print in one job, downgrade the rigid portions to a less durable, non-composite material. - Good video

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Google Reveals Its New "RankBrain" Artificial Intelligence System

Google Reveals Its New "RankBrain" Artificial Intelligence System | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Google is training a new artificial intelligence product on its search engine's most difficult queries.
Richard Platt's insight:

Google has just gone public with the details of a new artificial intelligence called RankBrain, which the search giant is using to handle difficult queries. The system is being used on what one Google research scientist calls a "very large fraction" of the search queries handled by Google. RankBrain helps Google decipher the approximately 15% of phrases that the search engine has not encountered before,Bloomberg reports.  Bloomberg’s Jack Clark, who spoke with Google research scientist Greg Corrado about the new AI service, explained that "if RankBrain sees a word or phrase it isn’t familiar with, the machine can make a guess as to what words or phrases might have a similar meaning and filter the result accordingly, making it more effective at handling never-before-seen search queries."  According to Corrado, RankBrain has become the third most important signal determining what search results a user sees.

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Aasia Muhammad's curator insight, October 26, 2015 10:18 PM

google just came up with a new intelligent system. the system only works with the technology that has been recently updated. RankBrian is a search giant. it can take the most difficult words, phrases, or questions and give you the most simplest answer. google has been updated making it more than 5 times easier to get any answer to anything. this technology is just the beginning.

 

With this type of technology things are almost impossible to stay secrets. people can hack things from the government in other countries. we as the people can find out things that the government dent want us to know that can make or break us a a nation.more money form the government is being put toward things the benefit the government not us as "the people".

 

on the bias side i don't think things like this is the smartest thing to do just because none is safe.

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Intel Is Building Artificial Smarts Right Into Its Chips

Intel Is Building Artificial Smarts Right Into Its Chips | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Intel's acquisition of yet another AI company shows how the chipmaker is seeking to bake AI into its products.
The post Intel Is Building Artificial Smarts Right Into Its Chips appeared first on WIRED.
Richard Platt's insight:

OVER THE PAST few years, the world’s biggest chipmaker has been buying up companies to help make its chips smarter.  Through acquisitions of companies like IndisysXtremeinsights, and perhaps most importantly, fellow chip maker Altera (a $16.7 billion deal), Intel has devoted much its artificial intelligence efforts on baking AI into its into chips, as well as software that powers its 3-D video cameras.  Today, Intel has added yet more AI to its portfolio with the purchase of Saffron Technology. Like many other AI startups, Saffron attempts to extract useful information from huge datasets via algorithms inspired in part on the way the human brain works. But instead of focusing on deep learning, the trendy branch of AI in which Google and Facebook are heavily investing, Saffron is focused its own technique called associative memory. The company was founded in 1999 by former IBM Knowledge Management and Intelligent Agent Center chief scientist Manuel Aparicio and led by former PeopleSoft executive Gayle Sheppard. It has deep roots in the enterprise software industry and cut its teeth selling software to the Department of Defense, such as a system for predicting the likely location of roadside bombs in Iraq.  “We see an opportunity to apply cognitive computing not only to high-powered servers crunching enterprise data, but also to new consumer devices that need to see, sense, and interpret complex information in real time,” Intel New Technology Group Senior Vice President Josh Walden says. “Big data can happen on small devices, as long as they’re smart enough and connected.”


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Democracy of Devices (Internet of Things) - London 2015 by Henning Deitrich

Learn more about the concepts underlying IBM's Adept Approach to the Internet of Things (IoT), including the democracy of devices.
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Learn more about the concepts underlying IBM's Adept Approach to the Internet of Things (IoT), including the democracy of devices.  A very interesting video if you're into the IoT thing.

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Global Wireless Sensor Network Market Become Very Fast Reaching $14.6 billion

Global Wireless Sensor Network Market Become Very Fast Reaching $14.6 billion | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
MRS added new report "Global Wireless Sensor Network Market 2015: Outlook, Opportunities, Research, Price, Segementation, Development 2019" to its store.
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IoT Key to the Future of Farming and Civilization

IoT Key to the Future of Farming and Civilization | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Research firm Beecham found the key to support demand for food is the advancement of precision farming enabled by the Internet of Things (IoT).
Richard Platt's insight:

Precision agriculture will be necessary to support demand for food

According to data provided by Beecham Research, the world population is estimated to hit 9.6 billion people, the majority of whom will be living in cities, by 2050; to support a population of that size, food production will have to increase by 70%.  In a new report titled Towards Smart Farming: Agriculture Embracing the IoT Vision, Beecham found the key to support the projected demand for food resources is the advancement of precision farming enabled with the smart connectivity supported by the Internet of Things (IoT).

Therese Cory, a senior analyst at Beecham, said, “The demand for more food has to be set against the challenges of climate change, more extreme weather conditions and the environmental impact of intensive farming practices.”   Citing research by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), the reports suggests, “In order to counter these challenges, the FAO recommends that all farming sectors should be equipped with innovative tools and techniques, particularly digital technologies. Precision agriculture aims to optimize yield per unit of farming land by using the most modern means in a continuously sustainable way, to achieve best in terms of quality, quantity and financial return.” Internet of Things use cases for precision agriculture include fleet management of farm vehicles; arable farming; livestock monitoring; indoor farming; fish farming; forestry; and storage monitoring.   In the U.S., some segments of the wireless industry have already recognized the revenue opportunity associated with telecom-powered precision farming.. AT&T, through its industrial IoT unit, has partnered with the agriculture machinery manufacturer John Deere to install a wireless modem in every piece of machinery produced. AT&T is also working to help reduce grain spoilage and improve yields through sensor systems.  Sensors are one of six components of smart farming laid out in the Beecham report. The others are data analytics; hardware and software; telematics, position tech; communications system like cellular; and software applications.  The Internet of Things and Agriculture are in many ways a perfect match for each other. IoT sensors allow farmers to track crop yields, soil nutrition and rainfall, with a previously unheard of level of precision.

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TDI Group's curator insight, October 26, 2015 9:30 AM

aggiungere la vostra comprensione ...

Debra Harris Lazaro's curator insight, October 27, 2015 2:16 PM

Self sustainability is key to any civilization. GMO is not the answer because its not natural.  GMO corn spikes higher sugars in diabetics apposed to  organic. True, why would the government let GMO or the FDA allow this to occur? As much as a hassle as it is to plant and grow  our own plants using a rubber tire as a way to grow our veggies and other items is a water saving way to grow produce. I grew 5 green pepper plants a variety of different colors in one tire which is still sustained and giving fruit. Just a few plants can feed a family and researching winter planting solutions will ahead of time will prepare us for the winter. Start a Garden its a good thing.

 

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Dyson launches its new ‘360 Eye’ robot vacuum cleaner in Japan

Dyson launches its new ‘360 Eye’ robot vacuum cleaner in Japan | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Dyson has launched its new ‘360 Eye’ robot vacuum cleaner in Japan this week. The device is now available for purchase at the Dyson’s store in Tokyo as well as some other stores across Japan. Dyson has said that the new robot vacuum cleaner will be launched in other parts of the world sometime in 2016. The cost of Dyson’s new Eye 360 robot vacuum cleaner in Japan is approximately $1,200; and is ,thus, the most expensive robot vacuum cleaner currently available on the market. The new Dyson 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner is a ‘tall’ device which comes with a big collection bin. As it name suggests, the vacuum cleaner has the capability to constantly observe and analyze its surroundings, as it can see the entire room in which it is being operated. According to the details shared by Dyson, the new 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner is equipped with a digital motor which is capable of spinning up to 78,000 revolutions per minute. The company claims that the digital motor of Eye 360 generates the highest suction power for any robotic vacuum. In addition, Dyson has also revealed that the 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner boasts the inclusion of the company’s Radial Root Cyclone technology, which can generate high centrifugal forces, so that even the smallest particles – like mold and pollen – can be easily captured

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Dell picks Next Biometrics sensors for notebooks, tablets

OSLO (Reuters) - Next Biometrics Group (NEXT.OL) will deliver at least 1.2 million fingerprint sensors to Dell Inc in 2016 for the U.S. firm's range of notebook and ...

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
Richard Platt's insight:

Biometric tools and approaches to creating a security protocol (in our research and analysis) has so far proven to be a the very least a vitally important tool to be used for getting the security that we seek for high tech, mobile, wearable and even dare I say IoT devices.  DELL has come to see some sensibleness in this for themselves.  Check out the video.

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Easily Hacked Tea Kettle Latest To Highlight Pathetic Internet Of Things 'Security'

Easily Hacked Tea Kettle Latest To Highlight Pathetic Internet Of Things 'Security' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

We've discussed at length that companies rushing to embrace the "Internet of Things" (read: networked devices for those of us not in marketing) tend to have completely forgotten a little something called device security. As a result we're now bombarded week after week with stories about cars that can be controlled remotely, televisions that share your unencrypted living room conversations with anybody on the Internet, and refrigerators that leave the door wide open to having your e-mail password stolen. Some of these are kind of cute exploits, but many of them could be potentially fatal.

While these companies are desperately trying to highlight the wonderful future of Internet connected devices, they've inadvertently been creating advertisements for why many devices should just remain stupid. Especially if you're going to cut corners in development so device security is an afterthought, or cut corners post release when it comes to quickly identifying and patching exploits.

The latest case in point: the $150 iKettle by UK company Smarter promises to save its users "two days a year in wasted waiting time" over traditional tea kettles. How? Users can remotely turn the kettle on from anywhere via smartphone app, potentially letting users walk into the house just as the kettle comes to a boil. Avoiding the horrible task of having to walk a few feet and wait a few minutes is the pinnacle of modern engineering to be sure; the problem is that for the better part of this year researchers have been noting that the security on the kettle was virtually nonexistent...


Via Jeff Domansky
Richard Platt's insight:

More detail on the tea kettle that can be hacked and understand how this thing called WiFi technology needs a bit more robustness to mitigate the threat of being hacked.  Read on.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 28, 2015 2:33 PM

Here's a look inside the challenge of security for Internet of things products.

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Connected kettles boil over, spill Wi-Fi passwords over London

Connected kettles boil over, spill Wi-Fi passwords over London | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

A security man has mapped and hacked insecure connected kettles across London, proving they can leak WiFi passwords.

The iKettle is designed to save users precious seconds spent waiting for water to boil by allowing the kitchen staple to be turned on using a smartphone app.

Pen Test Partners bod Ken Munro says hackers can make more than a cuppa, however: armed with some social engineering data, a directional antenna, and some networking gear they can "easily" cause the iKettle to spew WiFi passwords.

"If you haven’t configured the kettle, it’s trivially easy for hackers to find your house and take over your kettle," Munro says. "Attackers will need to setup a malicious network with the same SSID but with a stronger signal that the iKettle connects to before sending a disassociation packet that will cause the device to drop its wireless link....


Via Jeff Domansky
Richard Platt's insight:

A security man has mapped and hacked insecure connected kettles across London, proving they can leak WiFi passwords.  The iKettle is designed to save users precious seconds spent waiting for water to boil by allowing the kitchen staple to be turned on using a smartphone app.  Pen Test Partners bod Ken Munro says hackers can make more than a cuppa, however: armed with some social engineering data, a directional antenna, and some networking gear they can "easily" cause the iKettle to spew WiFi passwords.  "If you haven’t configured the kettle, it’s trivially easy for hackers to find your house and take over your kettle," Munro says. "Attackers will need to setup a malicious network with the same SSID but with a stronger signal that the iKettle connects to before sending a disassociation packet that will cause the device to drop its wireless link....

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 28, 2015 2:38 PM

Great story about the potential security issues with IoT products. it highlights how did simple it is to hack devices that are poorly or not configured or password-protected. Who'd a thought? Invasion of the connected kettles?

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Rackspace serves up free Carina Docker-based container-as-a-service beta on OpenStack

Rackspace serves up free Carina Docker-based container-as-a-service beta on OpenStack | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Using the native Docker API and tooling, the Carina container service aims to enable users to spin up containers quickly and easily.
Richard Platt's insight:

Until its probable general availability next year, the beta version of the Carina container service unveiled today by Rackspace will be free.  It offers developers, data scientists, and operators what the web-hosting firm says is a quick way to create and deploy a cluster for containerised apps.  Demonstrated at this week's OpenStack Summit conference in Tokyo, Carina is designed to widen the use of container clusters, employing the native Docker API and tooling, such as Swarm for orchestration, to move applications between dev, test, and production environments.  "What we've done, using our OpenStack public cloud and technologies around Docker, is create a container service where a customer can very quickly -- in seconds -- spin up a container. It's a container-as-a-service platform," Rackspace CTO John Engates said.  "They can spin up a container using their native Docker tools. Behind the scenes OpenStack is orchestrating everything to provision those containers -- and those containers can be provisioned on top of bare-metal servers, virtual machines, or even other containers underneath the platform."

Docker is the most popular technology for automating the creation and deployment of apps in containers -- a lighter-weight form of virtualisation. Containers use far less compute resources than typical virtual machines and also offer greater availability and scaling.

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We’re sitting on a Big Data Time Bomb

We’re sitting on a Big Data Time Bomb | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
$114 billion. That’s how much global organizations will spend on big data in 2018, an increase of more than 300 percent in just five years. But how much of that is money well spent?
Richard Platt's insight:

Despite big data’s promising benefits, few organizations have begun the essential steps to prepare for the adoption of new capabilities and data platforms. An industry survey of global companies found that only 35 percent have “robust processes for data capture, curation, validation, and retention.” Equally troubling, 67 percent “do not have well-defined criteria in place to measure the success of their big data initiatives.” Instead, big data solutions are integrated reactively, department by department, or not at all.  The amount of available data in the world will have exploded to 44 zettabytes by 2020 — 10 times what it was in 2013, according to a 2014 IDC report. Companies that fail to prepare for this next generation of massive data volume and insights run the risk of incurring operational and technical debt. In an example of corporate natural selection at work, those that fall behind are doomed to wither away.    Here’s what they can expect as this big data time bomb goes off.

Catastrophic loss of transparency. Few IT professionals have experience managing big data platforms at scale — a situation that has created a massive skills shortage in the industry. By 2018, U.S. companies will be short 1.5 million managers able to make data-based decisions. A recent McKinsey Quarterly report estimates that, in order to close this gap, companies would need to spend 50 percent of their data and analytics budget on training frontline managers; it also notes that few companies realize this need.   As data needs broaden, managers without a firm understanding of information management and best-practices in data extensibility will encounter major challenges with managing data-driven systems. 

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3D Printed Aircraft Interior

Join Fred Fischer, Director of PolyJet and FDM Applications at Stratasys, as he presents a real aircraft interior 3D printed using a unique combination addit...
Richard Platt's insight:

An interior of a real commercial aircraft  using 3D Printing (additive manufacturing) is perfect for high speed rapid prototyping.  Good overview video.

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Google Turning Its Lucrative Web Search Over to AI Machines

When Google-parent Alphabet Inc. reported eye-popping earnings last week its executives couldn’t stop talking up the company’s investments in machine learning and artificial intelligence.
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For the past few months, a “very large fraction” of the millions of queries a second that people type into the company’s search engine have been interpreted by an artificial intelligence system, nicknamed RankBrain, said Greg Corrado, a senior research scientist with the company, outlining for the first time the emerging role of AI in search.

RankBrain uses artificial intelligence to embed vast amounts of written language into mathematical entities -- called vectors -- that the computer can understand. If RankBrain sees a word or phrase it isn’t familiar with, the machine can make a guess as to what words or phrases might have a similar meaning and filter the result accordingly, making it more effective at handling never-before-seen search queries.  Unique Questions:  The system helps Mountain View, California-based Google deal with the 15 percent of queries a day it gets which its systems have never seen before, he said. For example, it’s adept at dealing with ambiguous queries, like, “What’s the title of the consumer at the highest level of a food chain?” And RankBrain’s usage of AI means it works differently than the other technologies in the search engine. “The other signals, they’re all based on discoveries and insights that people in information retrieval have had, but there’s no learning,” Corrado said.  Keeping an edge in search is critical to Google, and making its systems smarter and better able to deal with ambiguous queries is one of the ways it can keep a grip on time-starved users, who are now mostly searching using their mobile devices. “If you say Google people think of search,” 

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Arrest Made in TalkTalk Hacking Case

A teenager in Northern Ireland suspected of playing a part in the cyberattack on British telco TalkTalk Telecom Group PLC has been arrested, police said Monday.
Richard Platt's insight:

A teenager in Northern Ireland suspected of playing a part in the cyberattack on British telco TalkTalk Telecom Group PLC has been arrested, police here said Monday.  The development is the first major breakthrough in the case, opened Oct. 22 after a “significant and sustained” breach of TalkTalk’s website that the company said could have resulted in the loss of millions of customers’ personal data.  Detectives from the Metropolitan Police’s specialist cybercrime unit arrested the unnamed 15-year-old boy on suspicion of breaking the U.K.’s Computer Misuse Act shortly after 4 p.m. local time, the police said in a statement.   Officers from the cybercrime unit and the Northern Irish police force continued to search a property in County Antrim for evidence late Monday, said the police. The suspect remains in custody and is being questioned. In the U.K., criminal suspects aren’t named before formal charges are laid, though even if the teen is charged with a criminal offense, he is unlikely to be named by authorities due to laws designed to protect underage offenders.

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It is Alleged that to understand the IoT you need to understand Zenefits

It is Alleged that to understand the IoT you need to understand Zenefits | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Internet of Things is a buzzword in many board rooms in 2015. Enterprises from logistics to construction to healthcare, are seeing IoT as the source of data-driven cost savings and competitive advantage.
Richard Platt's insight:

Zenefits is one of those unicorns media loves to talk about and VCs would crave to fund. Since launching in May 2013, Zenefits reached $20 million run-rate by the end of 2014, and is projected to reach $100M run-rate by end 2015. And it just raised a whopping $500 million series C at a $4.5 billion valuation. Andreessen Horowitz, the famed venture capital firm now lists Zenefits as its largest investment to date.  Zenefits is an insurance broker disguised as free online HR software. The California company offers SaaS HR services to over 10,000 small and medium-sized businesses to help them manage all their HR processes in one place. Best of all it’s free. Zenefits earns commissions on health, dental, vision, life, disability, or any other insurance, every time their SMB customers open up a new health plan or onboard a new employee through its SaaS solution (In the US, every company has to offer their employees minimum health care).  Zenefits adds value in helping small companies manage the complexities of HR. It captures value as an insurance broker.

In essence, Zenefits is an insurance company that offers free SaaS services to acquire customers. SaaS requires low-cost low-touch sales and so Zenefits profits on the delta between the customer acquisition cost (CACs) in the HR and SaaS industries. Of course, Zenefits creates a captive audience which it then can resell into more insurance services and higher profits.   "Our ‘low-touch’ online model exceeded our expectations, affirming the continued health of our core business.  Wired magazine calls Zenefits’ business model “crafty and unusual”; crafty in using indirect models to profit, but as we’ll soon see Zenefits’ cross-industry business model is not unusual, but relatively unknown.

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Building a crowdsourced open source IoT network in 6 weeks

At the European Crowdsourcing Week in Brussels I talked to Wienke Giezeman: co-founder of The Things Network. He managed it to build a covering Internet of ...
Richard Platt's insight:

Wienke Giezeman: co-founder of The Things Network. He managed it to build a covering Internet of Things network in Amsterdam in 6 weeks. From idea to execution. Last week he started a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter to cover the rest of the world. A great example of the power pf bottom-up innovation by people which just DO things.

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Autonomous Cars Need Driver's Licenses, Too

Autonomous Cars Need Driver's Licenses, Too | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Over the past couple of weeks, Tesla has made headlines for its autopilot software, which allows the company's Model S sedan drive itself under certain conditions.


Via Karolina Maria Chachulska
Richard Platt's insight:

Over the past couple of weeks, Tesla has made headlines for its autopilot software, which allows the company's Model S sedan drive itself under certain conditions.  While fans and futurists have hailed this as the arrival of the fully autonomous car, some reports from owners suggest that the technology is far from perfect. (That's why Tesla says that even in autopilot mode, drivers should keep their hands on the steering wheel.)  By coincidence, late last week, Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle from the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute published a new report entitled "Should We Require Licensing Tests and Graduated Licensing for Self-Driving Vehicles?" In it, they discuss some of the practical and regulatory matters involved in making autonomous cars road-ready. To do so, they look at the driving skills that autonomous vehicles need to master. Could a graduated licensing system, like the one that human drivers undergo, be applied to autonomous cars?  While Sivak and Schoettle acknowledge the importance of GDL programs for young motorists, they say that the same process doesn't always make sense for self-driving vehicles. For example, while some GDL programs prevent novices from driving at night, the same approach doesn't work for autonomous cars:  "For self-driving vehicles, experience with daytime driving does not improve nighttime performance. Instead, good nighttime performance requires everything that good daytime performance does, plus sensors that provide the necessary information even at low levels of illumination. Thus, the GDL approach would not be appropriate here either."

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Smartphones now capable of reacting to emotion

Smartphones now capable of reacting to emotion | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Smartphones are now capable of reading our emotions and reacting to them, which may open up an extremely interesting world of possibilities. Don Dahler has the story.
Richard Platt's insight:

Smartphones are now capable of reading our emotions and reacting to them, which may open up an extremely interesting world of possibilities - see video from CBS News

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