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This Technology could be 100X faster than WiFi

This Technology could be 100X faster than WiFi | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It has been the stuff of science fiction for some time, a system that would transfer data through LED light bulbs and be up to 100 times faster than Wi-Fi.
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Velmenni, which was named a finalist in this year’s Slush 100 startup competition, has designed a system called Jugnu that it describes as the next generation of smart LED bulbs.   They designed a system that would transfer data through LED light bulbs and be up to 100 times faster than Wifi. Able to transfer data through visible light, the system allows for the transfer data to other bulbs, mobile phones, and internet. It is also working on an android app which would receive data from Jugnu.  The startup from Estonia is taking this technology – known as Li-Fi – from the lab and commercializing the concept. Li-Fi refers to the wireless communication system which uses light as a medium of transport instead of traditional radio frequencies.   “All we would need to do is to fit a small microchip to every potential illumination device. And this would then combine two basic functionalities: illumination and wireless data transmission,” he told the audience. “And it's this symbiosis that I personally believe could solve the four essential problems that face us in wireless communication these days. And in the future, you would not only have 14 billion light bulbs, you may have 14 billion Li-Fis deployed worldwide -- for a cleaner, a greener, and even a brighter future.”  Li-Fi, which was invented by the University of Edinburgh’s Harald Haas, isn’t going to completely replace Wi-Fi the transfer of data The transition, when it occurs, will take time, since devices would have to be retrofitted for the new technology and the world would have to replace all these incandescent light bulbs with LED bulbs. Haas, in a 2011 TedGlobal talk, argued LiFi would make systems more efficient and be more secure, since light doesn’t penetrate through walls.

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Joshua Ellington's curator insight, November 26, 2015 10:34 AM

Velmenni, which was named a finalist in this year’s Slush 100 startup competition, has designed a system called Jugnu that it describes as the next generation of smart LED bulbs.   They designed a system that would transfer data through LED light bulbs and be up to 100 times faster than Wifi. Able to transfer data through visible light, the system allows for the transfer data to other bulbs, mobile phones, and internet. It is also working on an android app which would receive data from Jugnu.  The startup from Estonia is taking this technology – known as Li-Fi – from the lab and commercializing the concept. Li-Fi refers to the wireless communication system which uses light as a medium of transport instead of traditional radio frequencies.   “All we would need to do is to fit a small microchip to every potential illumination device. And this would then combine two basic functionalities: illumination and wireless data transmission,” he told the audience. “And it's this symbiosis that I personally believe could solve the four essential problems that face us in wireless communication these days. And in the future, you would not only have 14 billion light bulbs, you may have 14 billion Li-Fis deployed worldwide -- for a cleaner, a greener, and even a brighter future.”  Li-Fi, which was invented by the University of Edinburgh’s Harald Haas, isn’t going to completely replace Wi-Fi the transfer of data The transition, when it occurs, will take time, since devices would have to be retrofitted for the new technology and the world would have to replace all these incandescent light bulbs with LED bulbs. Haas, in a 2011 TedGlobal talk, argued LiFi would make systems more efficient and be more secure, since light doesn’t penetrate through walls.

Malu Oliveira's curator insight, November 27, 2015 8:38 AM

A internet das coisas!

Scott Young's curator insight, December 11, 2015 12:29 PM

I recently heard about this. Very interesting.

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The abuse of shocking headlines in IoT or how many stupid things will be connected ?

The abuse of shocking headlines in IoT or how many stupid things will be connected ? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
[First published in https://pacomaroto.wordpress.com/2015/ ] I'm not sure if we have already passed the Peak of Inflated Expectations (Hype of the Io
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Great wrap up of the different points of view on what the IoT is and how it works. 

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Kevin T. Kjellerup's curator insight, November 25, 2015 8:58 AM

Are you ready, and is this too much, too fast?

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Two-legged puppy gets 3-D printed wheelchair

Two-legged puppy gets 3-D printed wheelchair | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Tumbles, a puppy born without front legs, is learning to get around on a custom-made 3-D printed wheelchair. CBSN's Contessa Brewer has the story.
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Tumbles, a puppy born without front legs, is learning to get around on a custom-made 3-D printed wheelchair. Yet another use for 3D Printers, and yet there are so many that have yet to be discovered.

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sam decker's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:04 PM

Tumbles, a puppy born without front legs, is learning to get around on a custom-made 3-D printed wheelchair. Yet another use for 3D Printers, and yet there are so many that have yet to be discovered.

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4 Reasons Your School Should Invest In A 3D Printer

4 Reasons Your School Should Invest In A 3D Printer | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
4 Reasons Your School Should Invest In A 3D Printer

Via Marta Torán, massimo facchinetti
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The use of 3D printers is becoming increasingly prevalent across the workforce, from medicine to confectionary, aerospace to sportswear.  The mere concept of them can seem daunting, and it is therefore easy for school leaders to overlook the benefits a 3D printer can have for their pupils. We’ve put together a list of strong arguments in favor of this fantastic investment in a bid to help you put forward a winning pitch to your school decision makers.  They Can Be Used in Any Subject  Although you may see the triumphs of 3D printing most commonly associated with fields in Science, the use of these printers can be extended to almost any subject in the curriculum. In math, they have been used to help students visualise a particularly difficult concept or graph, with the added benefit of adding an exciting factor to a subject that typically has a ‘boring’ reputation. History lessons could come alive with replicas of ancient artifacts and geography students could visit mountain ranges without leaving the classroom.

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Marta Torán's curator insight, November 16, 2015 3:23 PM

Razones para usar impresoras 3D en clase.

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What is the future of driverless cars?

What is the future of driverless cars? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Ford is now testing fully autonomous cars in a fake city in Michigan. Meanwhile, one of Google's driverless cars was pulled over in Mountain View, Calif., last week for impeding traffic. What can we expect from the imminent flock of self-driving cars?
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An effective system calls for effective regulation, and the public sector has been struggling to keep up with recent innovations such as Uber. Even if autonomous cars are to adequately replace buses with lowered operational costs, there’s still the question of optimal routing. Also, will city governments be ready to provide subsidies so the service can be affordable to everyone?  Yonah Freemark of The Transport Politic suggests that it is too soon for a complete upheaval of the transportation system in favor of self-driving cars and other technologies.  “New technologies offer the opportunity to change the way we think about transportation and likely offer us opportunities to improve our cities,” he wrote.  “But the public sector, and the civic sector in general, must continue to play the key role in planning, identifying essential investments, and aiding those who are in need.”

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Bougrier Benjamin's curator insight, November 16, 2015 5:50 AM
Le futur de la mobilité!
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New Android Exploit Can Hack Your Phone From a Website

New Android Exploit Can Hack Your Phone From a Website | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Here's the good news: The exploit's discoverer has disclosed it to Google, and he'll likely get a good reward for his efforts.
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Though we don't have the exact details of how it works, a new exploit for Android devices can allegedly bypass the devices' security systems in one shot. The attack, which uses some kind of JavaScript v8 exploit, can give said attacker complete administrative access to one's device. And once that happens, the attacker can load any app he or she wants onto an Android phone, which could become a gateway for even more malware (or more exploits).   Quihoo 360 researcher Guang Gong showed off the attack at the Pwn2Own panel at yesterday's PacSec conference in Tokyo. The most interesting thing about the demonstrated exploit is that an attacker doesn't have to take advantage of any other separate exploits first. All a person has to do is use Chrome to visit a compromised website with the new exploit loaded in, and that's it. Smartphone attacked.  The impressive thing about Guang's exploit is that it was one shot; most people these days have to exploit several vulnerabilities to get privileged access and load software without interaction," said PacSec organiser Dragos Ruiu, in an interview with Vulture South.  Bad news for those looking to take advantage of said exploit for their own nefarious purposes: Google representatives were alerted to the bug at the conference. Since Gong didn't spill the details publicly about how the exploit works, he likely qualifies for some kind of cash reward via Google's bug bounty programs. Exactly how much he might get remains a mystery at this point, as there are a number of factors that go into figuring out just how much exploit reporters receive for their efforts.  "In essence, our pledge to you is to respond promptly and fix bugs in a sensible timeframe - and in exchange, we ask for a reasonable advance notice. Reports that go against this principle will usually not qualify, but we will evaluate them on a case-by-case basis," reads Google's description.

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Expect better, faster Bluetooth in 2016 thanks to IoT

Expect better, faster Bluetooth in 2016 thanks to IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Not only will Bluetooth Smart devices get a 4x range boost, they'll also work as a mesh network for the fast growing IoT market.
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The overall range of Bluetooth Smart devices will expand 4X and data transfer speeds will be doubled over today's devices. More importantly, particularly for small IoT devices, the additional throughput and speed won't require any addition power over current wireless devices.  Even better: Next year, Bluetooth Smart gains mesh networking features.  That means you can have a wide range of Bluetooth objects in the home or office and worry far less about overall network coverage for them. Each device can repeat network signals to others on the network.   To help grow the IoT market -- expected to top 6.3 billion devices next year -- the Bluetooth SIG is smartly changing with the times so that it can stay in the forefront of people's minds when it comes to smart connected devices.

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Roku Unveils The “Roku SE,” A $50 Entry-Level Streamer, Discounted To $25 On Black Friday

Roku Unveils The “Roku SE,” A $50 Entry-Level Streamer, Discounted To $25 On Black Friday | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Roku recently addressed the needs of those looking for a premium media player to complement their new, 4K TV with the launch of the Roku 4, but now the..
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Roku recently addressed the needs of those looking for a premium media player to complement their new, 4K TV with the launch of the Roku 4, but now the company is moving to the other end of the spectrum with a device aimed at the low-end of the market. Today, the hardware maker revealed a low-cost version of its Roku player, the Roku SE, which will be affordably priced at $49.99 and discounted to $25 for Black Friday.  The Roku SE will work with HDMI and analog TVs, and will run the newly released operating system Roku OS 7, which will provide access to Roku’s nearly 3,000 streaming channels offering 300,000 movies and TV episodes.  You’re also able to use Roku’s search feature to find movies and TV shows by title, actor or director across over 20 streaming channels, as well as see how much titles cost across streaming services, as you can with Roku’s other models. And the Roku Feed feature lets you track when new titles are arriving on streaming services, including box office movies.

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Samsung Shows Off New Ativ Laptops

Samsung Shows Off New Ativ Laptops | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Ativ Book 9 Pro and Ativ Book 9 Spin both have new Intel Core i7 processors, but very different designs.
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The Ativ Book 9 Pro is meant to be a power-user's laptop. It has a brand-new Intel Core i7 6700HQ processor and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 950M graphics card, and it runs Windows 10. It's the bulkier of Samsung's two new systems, weighing in at 4.45 pounds and measuring 14.72 by 9.83 by 0.7 inches (HWD).  Samsung is really touting the Ativ Book 9 Pro's screen, a 15.6-inch, 3,840-by-2,160 4K panel that the company says has HDR enhancements that optimize contrast and brightness in the screen. It also has an Outdoor mode that's capable of emitting 500 nits when you use it in direct sunlight.  The laptop has three USB 3.0 ports, one USB-C, and one 4K HDMI port, as well as an SD card reader.

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Inside BlackBerry's last-ditch plan to win you back with Android

Inside BlackBerry's last-ditch plan to win you back with Android | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Once the mobile maker to beat, BlackBerry is fighting for survival. Its secret weapon: the first-ever BlackBerry phone powered by Google's Android software.
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"Android, in our mind, was a longtime coming," Louks said in an interview last week.  Chen, a software industry veteran hired to help save the Canadian company in late 2013, had already been talking to Google about how BlackBerry could better work with Android, the world's most popular operating system.  The next step was up to Louks, who previously worked at HTC and Sony Ericsson.  Nearly two years after that Vegas meetup, BlackBerry is getting ready to sell the $700 BlackBerry Priv, its first smartphone not powered by the company's own mobile software. Chen and Louks hope that by tying their fortunes to Android, BlackBerry will do something it hasn't been able to do in five years: win over customers who abandoned its once-almighty keyboard-based gadgets for Apple's iPhone and Samsung's Galaxy phones.  If the Priv is a flop, that will likely spell the end of the BlackBerry smartphone.  "If this doesn't resonate with users, there's not much else they can do," said Chris Hazelton, an analyst at 451 Research.

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T-Mobile 4G LTE CellSpot Is Indeed A “Feat Of Engineering”

T-Mobile 4G LTE CellSpot Is Indeed A “Feat Of Engineering” | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The 4G LTE CellSpot device can connect up to 16 compatible devices at a time, and is expected to be in stores from November 4 onward.
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T-Mobile unveiled its 4G LTE CellSpot mini-tower for T-Mobile customers, which provides users with 3G, VoLTE and 4G capability. T-Mobile users are not required to input any passwords or use any other verification methods, which allows them to connect to the 4G LTE CellSpot tower like they would to any other cell tower. T-Mobile’s Simple Choice postpaid customers can avail the service free of cost.  Eligible Simple Choice customers can obtain one 4G LTE CellSpot device for their home or business by coughing up a non-refundable fee as well as a $25 security deposit, which can be refunded later. As is typical of any T-Mobile announcement, the company commented on rival carriers, calling their services “outdated 3G-based femto cell solutions.” CEO John Legere called the new 4G LTE CellSpot a feat of engineering, and promised to provide the company’s customers with the best possible coverage.  The new T-Mobile device is 1.3 inches thick and measures at 8.5 inches in terms of width and length. The plug-n-play device only needs to be configured to the internet. The device then covers, on an average 3,000 square feet up to which consumers can expect to receive strong LTE signals on any T-Mobile-compatible LTE, 3G or 4G device. The device even provides LTE signals in zones where cellular service are unavailable; it works with devices which do not support Wi-Fi calling.  The 4G LTE CellSpot goes on sale from November 4 online via T-Mobile Customer Care and in participating stores across the US. T-Mobile has more information on the stores which carry the first-of-its-kind device to be provided by a US provider. The company has warned that the device may require customers to change their current plan. The 4G LTE CellSpot has low power settings to enable indoor use. The company claims that it is both ideal for small businesses and homes, and the portability factor adds to its appeal. The Wi-Fi CellSpot Router, which utilizes Wi-Fi services to enable messaging and calling was introduced before the launch of CellSpot.


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Vodafone: Hackers may have accessed bank details of 2000 customers

Vodafone: Hackers may have accessed bank details of 2000 customers | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones said the email addresses and passwords criminals used to try to access Vodafone accounts appeared to have been bought on the dark web.
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Vodafone said it noticed attempts to access customer account details between midnight on Wednesday and noon on Thursday, when it started an investigation. The company also warned customers to be on their guard for “phishing” attempts by the criminals, whereby they will contact those people whose details they have partly acquired in a bid to convince them to hand over their security details.  Hackers may have obtained the bank details of almost 2,000 Vodafone customers, according to the company.   A “handful” of customers have been subject to fraudulent attempts on their accounts, Vodafone said. Banks have been put on alert for fraud and the National Crime Agency (NCA), the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) are working to identify the cause of a potential early leak and ensure that all necessary procedures are followed.  The details could not be used to access customer bank accounts but customers may at risk of fraud.  1,827 customers had their account accessed in the attack, but Vodafone insisted its systems were “not compromised or breached in anyway”. A Vodafone spokesman told the BBC the affected Vodafone accounts had been blocked and their banks notified.

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Google insists it isn't killing Chrome OS

Google insists it isn't killing Chrome OS | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A recent report claimed Google plans to merge Android and Chrome OS into one platform.
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On Thursday, the The Wall Street Journal published a report claiming that Google is in the process of merging its two operating systems: Chrome OS and Android.   According to the Journal’s sources, Chrome OS would cease to exist after being folded into Android sometime in 2017. Combining the two operating systems has been in the works for nearly two years, the report said.

Google’s Chrome OS runs on laptop and desktop computers, and has gained traction in the education sector. Android powers 1.4 billion smartphones, tablets, and watches.  Shortly after the Journal’s story appeared, Google’s newly appointed senior vice president for Android and Chrome, Hiroshi Lockheimer, took to Twitter to refute the Journal’s report, stating, “We are very committed to Chrome OS.”  A Google spokesperson has since confirmed to Fortune that the company intends to keep Chrome OS around for the foreseeable future, and is still pursuing Chromebook partnerships, specifically in education.

Despite assurances (likely aimed to calm the fears among current and potential partners), doing away with Chrome OS in favor of Android isn’t such a bad idea because of how successful Android has become.  If anything, it’s a move that’s been foreshadowed for the past two years. First with Google adding the ability to run Android apps on Chrome OS, and second with Chrome OS adopting a more touch-friendly interface in 2-in–1 Chromebooks that can be transformed into something akin to a tablet.

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NVIDIA's 'mobile supercomputer' can make machines smarter

NVIDIA's 'mobile supercomputer' can make machines smarter | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
For makers that need way more power than a Raspberry Pi can offer.
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Hardware developers looking for a quick way to add machine learning to their devices just got some help from Nvidia. The GPU-centric company announced the Jetson TX1 developer module with an emphasis on machine learning. The device could lower the lead time needed to create machines that rely the on computations needed for dynamic input and computations. This includes: autonomous drones, facial recognition and behavioral analysis within a crowd and computer vision.  Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang said, "the architecture of the computer is fundamentally changing and it's changing right in front of us." He pointed out how GPUs are enabling the computing power needed for machine learning features like those found being utilized by Facebook, Google and YouTube for image recognition and stabilization. By offering the TX1 to the masses, companies without the resources of the Silicon Valley giants can build their own small-scale devices without additional overhead. "We're trying to democratize machine learning,"

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Terrorists potentially use video games to communicate undetected

Terrorists potentially use video games to communicate undetected | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Security analysis says ISIS members are using video game networks to communicate without being detected. CNET editor Jeff Bakalar talked about how the platforms are being misused.
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Security analysis says ISIS members are using video game networks to communicate without being detected

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sam decker's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:03 PM

Security analysis says ISIS members are using video game networks to communicate without being detected

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Walmart is selling a $10 Android phone with better specs than the 1st-gen iPhone

Walmart is selling a $10 Android phone with better specs than the 1st-gen iPhone | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Let's say you could have a smartphone with better specs than the first-generation iPhone for under $10... would you actually buy it? Or would you be so worried with its overall quality that you'd g...
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Let’s say you could have a smartphone with better specs than the first-generation iPhone for under $10… would you actually buy it? Or would you be so worried with its overall quality that you’d give it a pass? This dilemma is officially a reality, as Walmart recently started selling the TracFone LG Prepaid Lucky LG16 Smartphone, an Android phone that will cost you a mere $9.82. What does $9.82 buy you in terms of smartphone hardware?  According to its page at Walmart, the device features a 3.8-inch touch display, a 1.2GHz dual-core processor, a 3-megapixel camera and Android 4.4 KitKat. So yes, it’s a very outdated  device, although Motherboard  notes that these specs nonetheless are better than the specs of the original iPhone. And hey, it’s just $10!  

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Pál Kerékfy's curator insight, November 17, 2015 3:12 AM

Talán nem is az a kérdés, hogy most megvesszük-e ezt a 10 dolláros telefont... Mit jelent ez a "dolgok internete" szempontjából? Ha ennyire kevésből megvan egy használható telefon, elkezdünk olcsó telefonokat használni a meglévő cuccok integrálására?

#IoT 

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This smartphone battery charges 10X faster

This smartphone battery charges 10X faster | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Huawei, China's top smartphone maker, says it has found a way to speed it up 10 times faster than current batteries.
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During an industry event in Japan on Friday (November 13), Huawei showed off a lithium-ion battery that charged to 48% capacity in five minutes. The size of that battery was 3000 mAh.

The company also demonstrated a smaller, 600 mAh capacity battery that reached 68% in two minutes. (For comparison, the Samsung Galaxy S6 has a 2550 mAh battery. The iPhone 6 uses an 1810 mAh battery, according to iFixit.) "Soon, we will all be able to charge our batteries to full power in the time it takes to grab a coffee!" Huawei said.  The company said its new technology changes how lithium ions are stored and move inside the batteries — increasing charging speed.  Several other companies are also trying to make the battery charging process better.  Energous, Nikola Labs and a small handful of others are working on ways to charge gadgets using radio waves. The technology is making its way to the real world in a matter of months.  British hydrogen fuel cell maker Intelligent Energy says it has a working prototype of an iPhone 6 battery that doesn't need to be charged for seven days.

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Today's Formative Internet of Things Is Probably Doomed, Say Computer Scientists

Today's Formative Internet of Things Is Probably Doomed, Say Computer Scientists | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
What takes its place stands a much better shot.
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The paper from Korean academics presents a rather bleak outlook on the contemporary, formative internet of things. Namely, we can probably expect most of it to go the way of that Coke machine.

"Although many IoT applications have come to the market, the big challenge is to develop IoT applications and business models that will fill the unmet needs and wants of users and will make a lot of money for the providers," the authors conclude. "Many of the current applications are just testing the market. Although many are getting some attention from the trade press and early adopting users, we think most of them will not be successful in their current form, as it has always been the case when a new paradigm or new application possibilities open up." 

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Google's About Me page helps users control personal info

Google's About Me page helps users control personal info | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The About Me page, tailored for each user and editable, contains information including work history, contact information, educational background and places the user has lived, along with gender and birthday.
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People concerned about how much information is out there about them on Google have a new way to control what everyone can see.

Without any fanfare, Google has begun rolling out an About Me page to make it easier for people to control what others can see about them across Google services.  The page should be welcome news to people concerned about their privacy, according to Zeus Kerravala, an analyst with ZK Research.  "With this feature, there are no changes to what information people can see, but a way for people to better control what people can see about them across Google services in one place,"Google spokesperson wrote in an email to  Computerworld.   Google, with its myriad services like Gmail, search, YouTube and productivity apps, has been collecting a lot of information about its users.  The About Me page, which is tailored for each user, contains information like work history, contact information, educational background and places the user has lived, along with gender and birthday.

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Nathalie RAVEAU's curator insight, November 13, 2015 4:42 AM

Test and learn. Google s'érige en protecteur de la vie des internautes ?

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The one thing about ‘matching’ algorithms that dating sites don’t want you to know

The one thing about ‘matching’ algorithms that dating sites don’t want you to know | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Psst -- research shows they don't actually work.
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The strongest evidence for this comes from a 2012 paper published by Northwestern University’s Eli Finkel and four co-authors in the journal “Psychological Science in the Public Interest,” which not only eviscerated the very concept of matching algorithms, but called on the Federal Trade Commission to regulate claims about their effectiveness.  To understand why these authors found these claims so troubling, you first have to understand some basic things about how relationships work. Leave aside, for a minute, your Disneyland notions of soulmates or true love: In reality, most people could happily pair off with a large number of potential partners, and the factors that determine whom they do pair with have as much to do with circumstance as anything else.  Relationship success basically depends on three things, Finkel et al. explain: individual characteristics, like whether you’re smart or what kinds of hang-ups you have around relationships; quality of interaction, or how you hit it off in-person; and surrounding circumstances — stuff like your race or health or financial status.  Right off the bat, this proves a major obstacle for matching algorithms. They simply can’t account for your future circumstances or the way you’ll jibe with another person, particularly before you’ve met; they might attempt to model those things, but there’s not enough input data to account for the diversity of possible outcomes.

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Self-driving cars will rule the roads in 2030, says Internet of Things visionary

Self-driving cars will rule the roads in 2030, says Internet of Things visionary | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With no shortage of automakers working on robo-cars, and with Uber already a "sensor platform on wheels," we're well on the way, says MIT vet Kevin Ashton.
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In 1999, Ashton coined the term "Internet of Things," which is how we now understand the network of sensor-packed devices, from phones to street lamps to household appliances, that are learning to talk to one another. In thinking about smart tags for labeling products, he foresaw the almost ubiquitous connectivity we enjoy today.  Another of Ashton's predictions, one looking into the less-distant future, is that we will all own self-driving cars by 2030.  Self-driving cars nicely embody the vision of the Internet of Things, as they're expected to pack multiple sensors that will communicate their presence and observe their immediate environment. For now the technology can be seen only in prototype vehicles, but it's being seriously explored by multiple automakers, as well as the likes of Google and Uber. Google and Toyota, among others, are shooting to get self-driving cars in consumers' driveways by 2020 , so accounting for gradual adoption and the long life cycle of vehicle ownership, Ashton might not be too far off.  Meanwhile, the whole of the Internet of Things market will grow apace. Market researcher IDC puts that growth at an average of 13% each year through 2020, by which point billions of objects will be connected and the industry could be worth $3 trillion.  Ashton frequently gets asked whether self-driving cars are safe. "Wrong question," he said, speaking at Microsoft's Future Decoded event in London on Wednesday. The question should be: "Are human-driven cars safe? The answer is no." More than 3,000 people around the world are killed in car accidents every day, according to the Association for Safe International Road Travel , and most of these deaths are caused by human error.

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This is Local Motors 3D printed car: It could change everything

This is Local Motors 3D printed car: It could change everything | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
3D printing may be mainstream enough not to raise an eyebrow any more, but Local Motors' plan to print cars is still ambitiously unusual. The Phoenix, AZ
Richard Platt's insight:

While automakers have relied on 3D printing for prototyping purposes before now, Local Motors aims to be the first company to deliver a full car, on the road, using the system. According to Elle Shelley, chief marketing officer, there's more than just cashing in on a topical technology to the firm's decision.  In fact, the LM3D will be safer than other vehicles, Shelley explained to me at the Las Vegas show, because its production process allows Local Motors to design in crumple and deformation zones. Effectively, the whole frame can be a complex roll-cage.  The LM3D should be more ecologically-sound than rivals, too. The 3D printing process means less wastage, and the print material itself is designed to be completely recyclable.  Then there's the flexibility. The current prototype is an open-top bubble of a car, part moon buggy and part dune racer, but Local Motors envisages offering a broad spectrum of customization on top of the core design.  Exactly how that will be delivered is unclear at this stage - translating the ideas of eager but untrained customers into something structurally sound might be tricky - but the final goal is an "n of one" as Shelley puts it, each car being effectively unique

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Frank Gogola's curator insight, November 11, 2015 8:37 AM

Completely customizable and unique 3-D printed cars.  Awesome.  I want one!

Bougrier Benjamin's curator insight, November 16, 2015 5:51 AM

Bientôt comme outil de production dans les usines de production des groupes automobile? 

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Google Boasts Self-Driving Cars Will Become Even Smarter: Here's How Google's Autonomous Cars Learn Kids' Behavior

Google Boasts Self-Driving Cars Will Become Even Smarter: Here's How Google's Autonomous Cars Learn Kids' Behavior | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Google has revealed that its self-driving cars will soon be more intelligent, particularly more cautious around kids. Here's how Google's autonomous cars learn about the youngsters' behaviors and movements... even when they're in odd Halloween costumes.
Richard Platt's insight:

Google says it's making its autonomous cars even smarter as a whip as it has equipped them with sensors and software which will soon enable the cars to drive more carefully around children.  On Saturday, the Mountain View-based tech titan invited kids sporting a multitude of Halloween costumes to hang out around the parked prototypes of its autonomous cars to silently learn about the youngsters' behaviors and movements, in a bid to make its mini cars a lot safer down the road.  "This gives our sensors and software extra practice at recognizing children in all their unique shapes and sizes, even when they're in odd costumes," Google points out kids may behave erratically and unpredictably, as they suddenly jump into the road to retrieve a stray ball or run down a sidewalk. Additionally, the company is mindful of the fact that children are often difficult to see behind parked vehicles or any other objects.

But with Google's extra vigilance, its self-driving cars will soon drive more careful around kids.  Google boasts that even if its cars can't appreciate the effort these children put in dressing as their much-loved movie characters, these autonomous cars still come equipped with the ability to pay full attention.  In December last year, Google unwrapped the very first completed build of its autonomous car, rocking a sleek body akin to a mini Volkswagen Bug and sporting functioning headlights.

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Nissan begins tests on Leaf-based IDS prototype

Nissan begins tests on Leaf-based IDS prototype | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Nissan Leaf-based autonomous prototypes have been sighted on Japanese city roads earlier in the week.
Richard Platt's insight:

While the Nissan IDS concept at the Tokyo Motor Show is a far more comprehensive look at what the future may bring for the automaker’s self-driving initiatives, the company is working on slowly but surely getting the technology out to production models, as Leaf-based autonomous driving prototypes have been sighted on Japanese city roads earlier in the week.  Nissan is testing its Piloted Drive, or PD mode, which is an integral part of the Intelligent Driving System that serves as the centerpiece of its Tokyo Motor Show concept. As we stated previously, Nissan plans to get this tech on production models by next year, and when it does, it will allow the car to take over in certain situations, and drive autonomously even in heavy traffic situations. By 2018, the company hopes to have autonomous lane changing baked in, and by 2020, it’s looking forward to have the system navigating city roads and intersections without any human intervention required.  According to Motor Trend, Nissan is making use of a high-spec laser scanner with 3D measurement features to gauge the prototype’s distance from nearby objects. It also has used an eight-way camera with 360-degree view to help the IDS cross intersections smartly. More details on the project should be forthcoming, though, in what could be a year-long run-up before the IDS features debut on production cars late next year.

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Battle Heats Up Over Exports of Surveillance Technology

Battle Heats Up Over Exports of Surveillance Technology | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley is resisting federal plans to increase regulations on exports of “dual use” technology like servers and software used in social media that can also be used for spying.
Richard Platt's insight:

Ayman Ammar and Rashid Albuni claimed to be computer technology distributors, operating through multiple corporations in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates. The United States government, though, charged them with smuggling — of illegally shipping American equipment to the Syrian government that can help it monitor Internet traffic and spy on dissidents.  The Syrian case, in which the two men were fined last month for violating American economic sanctions against Syria, is one of the few the Obama administration has pursued to limit authoritarian governments from acquiring technology that enables censoring, spying and hacking.  That is largely because many of the same tools that repressive governments seek from Western companies are vital for social media and other communications by political protesters and grass-roots organizers throughout the world. The software and other equipment are also used by American and other law enforcement agencies to track criminals or disrupt plots, and are needed to filter out unwanted content from most commercial and governmental networks and to keep them secure.  Such dual-use technology is now at the center of a conflict between Silicon Valley and the administration over additional restraints on technology exports. The administration signed an international agreement in 2013 that calls for new curbs on exports of advanced surveillance technology to governments with troubling human rights records. The agreement adds the technology to a longstanding arms control pact that seeks to limit weapons exports to such governments.  Some argue that the global market for such technology is emerging as a 21st century version of the arms trade. To go along with their tanks, assault helicopters and fighter jets, repressive governments are now seeking the latest routers, servers and software from Silicon Valley or Europe.

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