Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Know your Minimum Winning Game for startup success

Know your Minimum Winning Game for startup success | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It's surprising how frequently entrepreneurs struggle when potential investors ask them a simple question: "What are you going to accomplish with this round of financing?"

At XSeed Capital we are introduced to over 500+ new startup opportunities every year, and we directly meet or talk to 150–200 of these companies. In this context, I am sometimes asked what is the “biggest mistake” that a CEO or management team makes when pitching venture capitalists. While there are several that come to mind, I remain surprised at how frequently even experienced entrepreneurs struggle with a simple question:

“What are you going to accomplish with this round of financing?”

In an unexpectedly large number of conversations and meetings, instead of hearing proposed measurable milestones, investors are given a “to do” list of activities from entrepreneurs: hire some engineers, launch the first product, get some revenue, do some marketing, etc.

In a world of staged funding rounds, an idea that my Stanford colleague, Robert Burgelman, and I wrote about in 2007 can provide entrepreneurs with a way to think about how they should contemplate what needs to be achieved with each infusion of capital and the size of the round they are raising: the Minimum Winning Game (MWG). Read more: click image or title.




Need funding?

Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.l/1aKy7km


Via Marc Kneepkens
Richard Platt's insight:

Exceptional advice not only for startups but also large corporations as well that have their own business building activities internal to their organizations.  I have been long time supporter of MWG theory, along with the Porter 5 Plus model and the Strategic Inflection Point elements that make up the broader theory.  In contrast to the MVP model of the Lean Start-Up as promoted by others in Silicon Valley and elsewhere, which I see from my p.o.v. as a much smaller subset of what MWG theory propositions, necessary perhaps but insufficient in the kind of analysis and forethought required.  (In full disclosure I am ex-Intel, and specifically helped drive innovation across the enterprise and saw how MWG theory (when applied correctly) is a  better than other approaches to what we've seen different managers, groups, organizations inside of Intel as well as in other high tech firms.)

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 21, 2015 7:41 AM

Finding out what the VC's or investors expect from you is an important element in preparing your pitch. Go through possible questions and document yourself well.

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Sharing Patient Records Is Still A Digital Dilemma For Doctors

Sharing Patient Records Is Still A Digital Dilemma For Doctors | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Technology entrepreneur Jonathan Bush says he was recently watching a patient move from a hospital to a nursing home. The patient's information was in an electronic medical record, or EMR. And getting the patient's records from the hospital to the nursing home, Bush says, wasn't exactly drag and drop.

Via VAB Traductions, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

In an era when most industries easily share big, complicated, digital files, health care still leans hard on paper printouts and fax machines. The American taxpayer has funded the installation of electronic records systems in hospitals and doctors' offices — to the tune of $30 billion since 2009. While those systems are supposed to make health care better and more efficient, most of them can't talk to each other.

Bush lays a lot of blame for that at the feet of this federal financing.

"I called it the 'Cash for Clunkers' bill," he says. "It gave $30 billion to buy the very pre-internet systems that all of the doctors and hospitals had already looked at and rejected," he says. "And the vendors of those systems were about to die. And then they got put on life support by this bill that pays you billions of dollars, and didn't get you any coordination of information!"  -  Bush's assessment is colored by the fact that the company he runs — athenahealth — is cloud-based, and stresses easily sharing electronic health records. The firm also got a lot of the federal cash.  -  Dr. Robert Wachter, with the University of California, San Francisco, says sure — in hindsight, the government could have mandated that stimulus money be spent only on software that made sharing information easy. But, he says, "I think the right call was to get the systems in. Then to toggle to, 'OK, now you have a computer, now you're using it, you're working out some of the kinks. The next thing we need to do is to be sure all these systems talk to each other.' "  -  Right now, the ability of the systems to converse is at about a 2 or 3 on a scale of 0 to 10, Wachter and Bush agree.

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How Wearable Technology is Helping To Build More Aircraft

Growing global demand for air travel means the world needs more airplanes. Wearable technologies are being used by the aviation industry to produce more plan...
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A video on Accenture and Airbus's application of wearable tech in the manufacturing space

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Cellular Wireless Failover Issue for the IoT

Cellular Wireless Failover Issue for the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The loss of traditional Internet network connectivity can lead to lost revenue, decreased productivity, and failed compliance, as well as reputation & brand impact.
Richard Platt's insight:

Internet downtime is expected and occurs from scheduled interruptions (service provider maintenance), random accidents (nearby construction damaging physical infrastructure), or even unexpected and unpredictable disruptions due to extreme events (flood or fire). Being prepared for downtime is a necessary component of sound business practices.  -  An InformationWeek survey found that enterprises, on average, experience over 14 hours of connectivity downtime per year. Some high profile cases lasted well over a week. Gartner estimates that on average the cost to enterprises during periods of downtime is $5,600 /  minute, that’s more than $300K / hour.  -   The reality is: in a disaster, wired networks are usually the first to fail and the last to recover. So what can you do? You need an Internet connectivity backup plan.  - Adding traditional “wired” redundancy is not a solution as wired technologies typically run in the same conduits and are vulnerable to all of the same threats as your primary connectivity. Wired redundancy is also costly to implement and has high recurring monthly charges that can be prohibitive for large distributed businesses.

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Intel Technology (applied) in the Internet of Things

Intel has been trying to get a foot in the embedded market of the "Internet of Things" with a new tiny processor called the Quark X1000. Based on this CPU, they ...
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Ralf Quint (an independent developer) presenting at the Southern California Linux Expo on video,  Where he provides an explanation of Intel's product technology in the embedded market of the "Internet of Things" with the Quark X1000. - Based on this CPU, they released first in 2013 the Intel Galileo (Gen 1), a small embedded board that is both pin compatible with the established Arduino boards as well as programmable with a special version of the Arduino IDE for the X1000 SoC. This board was released in a newer, somewhat improved version (Gen 2) in the summer of 2014 as well accompanied by the general release of the Intel Edison, for which now also an Arduino pin compatible "motherboard" is available.  -  This presentation will show the features of those boards, along possible drawbacks and caveats compared to similar offerings of other manufacturers in the growing market of IoT, including the available Linux derivatives available as well as the freely available version of Microsoft Windows for the Intel Galileo

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Give babies iPads as soon as they are born, say scientists 

Give babies iPads as soon as they are born, say scientists  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New research by the University of London suggests newborn babies should be given tablets because they provide more stimulation for their brains than books.
Richard Platt's insight:

Babies should be given iPads as soon as they are born to help them learn, according to scientists.  New research by the University of London found that using tablets provides more stimulation for newborns' brains than books.  The findings go against previous studies which suggested looking at a screen can damage children's social skills.   -  Professor Annette Karmiloff-Smith, who led the research, told the Sunday Times that babies should be given tablet computers 'from birth'.  'It is shocking how fast they learn, even faster than adults to do things like scroll up and down text,' she said.  -  

'Books are static. When you observe babies with books, all they are interested in is the sound of the pages turning. Their visual system at that age is attracted by movement.'  Research found that using tablets provides more stimulation for newborns' brains than books Initially academics found a small group of babies - some aged six months and some 10 months old - could recognise the number three better if it was shown to them on an iPad.  Now the academics are using a larger sample of hundreds of babies and toddlers, with one group given the iPads from birth and the others not allowed to use tablets.  -  Prof Karmiloff-Smith believes the children given computers will show better signs of development, even if it not in a conventional sense.

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Connected Speaker Market Heats Up With Super High-End Devialet Phantom

Connected Speaker Market Heats Up With Super High-End Devialet Phantom | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
French speaker maker Devialet builds some really expensive audio gear. Since 2007, its high-end audio equipment has gone from anywhere between $8,000 to $30,000. But the company is hoping to break into the mass market with its $2,000 Phantom speakers and now it's bringing them to the United States -- and it's raised another $20 [...]
Richard Platt's insight:

Looking more like a futuristic space capsule, the Phantom speakers are able to replicate the sound and presence of speakers 20 times its size, the company claims. The little speakers do pack a big presence. Listening to them at 65% volume in a conference room, the entire room was shacking and retailing. Two subwoofers at each side of the spherical speakers vibrate in and out.  -  The main advancement in the audio hardware comes from what the company calls analog-digital hybrid (ADH) technology that blends the smoothness of analog with the strength of digital amplification. Its audio chip combines four digital amplifiers and one analog amplifier.  The Phantom has both WiFi and Bluetooth radio chips. Bluetooth has been typically looked down on by audiophiles, but the company decided to include Bluetooth in the U.S. version because the company wanted to make streaming music from smartphones as easy as possible.

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Why the Internet of Things is called Internet of Things

Why the Internet of Things is called Internet of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A comprehensive Internet of Things definition, a look at the IoT history from its birth in 1999 to now and an explanation of IoT vs M2M vs IoE vs Others.

Via Margarida Sá Costa
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Richard Platt's curator insight, February 7, 2015 12:02 AM

Just in case you didn't have an understanding of where all of these technologies fit within one another.

Renato Machado Costa's curator insight, February 14, 2015 9:32 PM

Very nice IoT definitions and insights!

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New Colorado law targets frivolous patent lawsuits

New Colorado law targets frivolous patent lawsuits | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Colorado will start prosecuting so-called patent trolls, businesses and individuals who falsely claim to have the rights to an idea or product so they can intimidate inventors and companies into

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
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Colorado will start prosecuting so-called patent trolls, businesses and individuals who falsely claim to have the rights to an idea or product so they can intimidate inventors and companies into doling out money to settle or avoid lawsuits.  -  A bill signed into law this month makes Colorado one of about two dozen states that have passed measures to crack down on patent trolls in the past two years. With businesses spending billions of dollars to deal with frivolous claims, Congress also has two pending bills addressing the topic.

Companies around the country spend about $29 billion a year in legal fees because of fraudulent claims, according to legislative analysts who worked on the Colorado bill.  -  "Patent trolls have turned patent law into an abusive litigation process," said Republican Sen. David Balmer, one of the sponsors of the Colorado law.

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Nest CEO on Rising Sales, Building Hardware and Sharing Data

Nest CEO on Rising Sales, Building Hardware and Sharing Data | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

In an interview Nest Labs CEO Tony Fadell discussed sales trends, the pace of innovation and how Nest handles data.

Richard Platt's insight:

Nest Labs CEO Tony Fadell: "Hardware is not fast. Hardware development cycles, if you are doing a good job, are 12 months minimum. If you look at when we acquired Dropcam, the deal didn’t close until August (2014). This is a whole new device – if you open up the Dropcam hardware it’s not the same hardware inside. We’ve built a whole new app on top of it. Behind the scenes we were also building the second generation Nest Protect and testing the hell out of it. So it depends on how you look at it. To do the breadth of what we are doing takes a long time. I would love to speed up things. But atoms are much harder than bits."

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Wi-Fi and wearable tech in new NHS information plan

NHS England unveils plan to allow clinicians to tap into information 'wherever they are'
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Tim Kelsey, NHS national director for patients and information, outlined the plans in advance of taking part in the Kings Find Digital Health Congress.   spoke of enabling doctors and nurses to access lifesaving information from anywhere in England for primary, urgent and emergency care by 2018, and for all other NHS services by 2020. Significant progress has already been made in this area, with a third of ambulances now sharing records digitally with A&E doctors.

“The NHS is embracing the offering of digital services to patients, with more than 55 million patients set to benefit from progress,” Kelsey said.  -  “As well as giving patients more choice and control, better use of technology can save money.”

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Samsung Galaxy Keyboard Bug Exposes Hundreds of Millions to Exploit

Samsung Galaxy Keyboard Bug Exposes Hundreds of Millions to Exploit | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
More than 600 million Samsung smartphones could be vulnerable.
Richard Platt's insight:

More than 600 million Samsung smartphones could be vulnerable.

Hundreds of millions of users of Samsung Galaxy smartphone models S4 through S6 are potentially vulnerable to a computer bug that researchers disclosed at the Black Hat Conference in London on Tuesday.  The flaw, discovered by a Ryan Welton, a researcher at the cybersecurity firm NowSecure, lets attackers wreak havoc on Samsung mobile device models. It can give a hacker covert control over a phone’s microphone and camera, access to text messages, and the ability to download malicious apps, among other things.

The issue arises from a defect in the software updater for Samsung’s default virtual keyboard, a customized version of the word-prediction technology developed by SwiftKey. When a device downloads a language pack update, any man-in-the-middle attacker—a bad actor positioned on the same network as the user—can swap out the real file with malware, thus compromising the device.  The default keyboard program checks for updates automatically, so even people who use other keyboard apps are vulnerable.

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Rise of the machines: The industrial Internet of Things is taking shape

Rise of the machines: The industrial Internet of Things is taking shape | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Businesses need to take a few notes from the early adopters of the connected movement -- consumers -- and see how they can creatively put the industrial IoT to work to solve industry problems in big ways.
Richard Platt's insight:

The flow of technology adoption is reversing — as is the case with connected devices. Historically, businesses have sat in the driver seat of technological innovation and driven the adoption of new technologies. Following the old model, BlackBerry phones were created as a device architected around the needs of large corporations and slowly consumers began to adopt them as well.

The roles have reversed. Now consumers are bypassing companies, as they become faster to integrate new technologies into their lives and companies are working fast to play catch up. The first iteration of the IoT saw users quickly adopting wearable devices to track everything from nutritional intake and sleep patterns to calories burned and steps taken. Following suit, businesses began to look at how they could use data from connected sensors to optimize how they functioned.   Now they are taking this a step further and applying these insights to bigger machines equipped with data-gathering sensors. This new movement, the industrial IoT, is accelerating the connection of objects with humans and also with other objects to reveal deep insights.

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US manufacturing: Why the hottest start-up is a factory

US manufacturing: Why the hottest start-up is a factory | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A growing number of people in their 20s are eschewing the typical path to riches through software start-ups and instead are turning to something a little more concrete.
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 Cortex Composites, has received hundreds of thousands of dollars in investor funding, and just accepted its first million-dollar contracts.  Mixing various types of cement and webbing, to create a cheap but sturdy rollable cement. - The idea was that it could replace expensive mixing trucks in places that need just thin layers of cement. Drainage ditches, canal beds - mostly in developing countries in Africa - were the theoretical target.    For Mr Krasnoff the appeal of actually making something tangible was irresistible.   He's part of what's been called the "hardware renaissance" of companies looking to move beyond traditional software and into markets like wearable technologies and internet-connected devices.


"The barriers to entry for people looking to build a product are coming down - it's faster to build a prototype, social media is making it easier to market your product, and crowdfunding is making it easier to raise that first lump of money," says Noramay Cadena, the co-founder of Make in LA, Los Angeles' first hardware-focused incubator space.

Ms Cadena worked for 10 years at traditional manufacturing firms including Boeing before founding Make in LA, which has partnered with a manufacturer, NeoTech, to help its first class of firms get their products made.  She says changes in the industry - in which big firms such as Boeing and General Electric have consolidated their businesses to focus on core competencies - have opened the door a bit for quirky, smaller firms looking to enter the manufacturing space.


The third option - which has also captured younger builders - of building smaller, microfactories that can contract manufacture quickly and cheaply.  Jeremy Herrman, 28, and Nick Pinkston, 31, met in 2008 when they bonded of a shared love of tinkering and a mutual fascination with the still-nascent 3D printing industry.  The two realised that they were hearing the same complaint over and over again: it was difficult for hardware entrepreneurs to find manufacturers willing to take on their projects.  So at the beginning of 2014, the two launched Plethora - a fully vertically integrated factory in the Dogpatch neighbourhood of San Francisco, which they filled with advanced 3D printers, robots and traditional milling machines. They currently have 20 employees and have raised more than $5m (£3.2m) in funding.  -  Crucial to their effort is, of all things, software which the two custom built to allow hardware firms to upload their designs and get feedback on whether or not the object they were hoping to prototype could be built according to their specifications.  Mr Hermann says that he thinks there are a lot of young software engineers like him who have turned back to manufacturing, an industry he says "hasn't changed much in 100 years".

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Parkinson's wearable tech wins Founders Forum F Factor prize

Parkinson's wearable tech wins Founders Forum F Factor prize | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Gyroglove, the company behind a wearable technology that stabilises the hands of people living with Parkinson's, has scooped the inaugural £10,000 F Factor prize
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The award, launched by the Founders Forum and X Factor impresario Simon Cowell, was set up to discover and support a new generation of young entrepreneurs pushing the boundaries of technology.  The London event crowned 24-year-olds Paul de Panisse Passis and Tiarvando Lasiman the overall winners, from a pool of hundreds of UK-wide contenders.  -  Gyroglove, the company behind a wearable technology that stabilises the hands of people living with Parkinson's, has scooped the inaugural £10,000 F Factor prize.  -  Gyroglove is a responsive, wearable glove that's designed to counteract the hand tremors suffered by people living with Parkinson's. The glove, which uses gyroscopes and accelerometers, is designed to make it easier and more comfortable for wearers to do everything from get dressed to prepare meals. The glove aims to reduce tremors by around 60% -- without the need for any kind of invasive surgery -- which could have a huge impact on the everyday lives of the more than 200 million people across the world living with Parkinson's.

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Industrial Internet of Things Integration

Industrial Internet of Things Integration | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Industrial and economic analysts predict that over the next ten years the demand for mass-produced, highly personalized products will guide innovation of production processes and organization. This will require the convergence of mechanical, electronic, and information technologies.Innovation in fields such as robotics, automation, Cloud Computing, 3D printing, social networking and connectivity will lead to a new form of production identified as smart manufacturing, Industry 4.0 or Industrial I
Richard Platt's insight:

The 4th industrial revolution will be marked by materialization of the information or, equivalently, the computerization of physical components and the total integration of machines and work flows. This scenario has a significant implication—the proper management of information and the interdependencies of the materials will lead to a reduction in production time and required stock, with a consequent reduction in required capital.  This moves the competitive advantage from those who have greater capital investment capacity to those who have a greater capacity for information coordination and control, those who are able to operate with a maximum level of flexibility.  -  We are certainly only at the beginning of the 4th industrial revolution, but given the speed of change brought about by technology, it is reasonable to think that we could be admiring a significantly changed manufacturing scenario within the next few years.

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Lots of New Tech for the VR Gaming Space

Lots of New Tech for the VR Gaming Space | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Electronic Entertainment Expo 2015 (E3) has taken over the scene with all new and amazing advancements in virtual reality gaming. Located in Los Angeles, they have brought a conglomeration of gaming generations to their event.
Richard Platt's insight:

Two new technology applications for the VR Gaming Space noted here (more on the actual page):

  1. Nod Backspin is the first multiplatform hand-held gaming controller released at E3 Conference this week. The design is top of the line; fitting perfectly in your hand.  Nod Backspin is created for VR gaming with low latency, sub-millimeter accuracy hand tracking, and traditional joystick and analog controls. They have raised the bar on what future immersive controllers must feel like to the user, seamless. It is available for sale at $149.
  2. Oculus Touch is a head held controller that is designed alongside Facebook and Windows 10. It is compatible with the frontier of Virtual Reality headsets, Oculus Rift. Together they combined into an immersive gaming experience. Oculus Touch recognizes normal hand gestures, like waving and thumbs up, from both hands. Any gesture made by your real body will be mimicked into the VR digital avatar.
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The Internet of Things (IoT): 8 Myths and Facts

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes a totally interconnected world, but there are quite a few myths that surrounds that world.
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Interesting if you don't already know about the IoT

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NIST Looks to Secure the IoT

NIST Looks to Secure the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Among the most vulnerable points in networks ranging from home offices to the proposed Internet of Everything are radio frequency, or RF, links that will b
Richard Platt's insight:

Among the most vulnerable points in networks ranging from home offices to the proposed Internet of Everything are radio frequency, or RF, links that will be used to tie together potentially billions of devices.

RF links on drones are particularly vulnerable to hacking, and as more devices are connected to form an Internet of Things/Sensors, much attention is being focused on how to secure the vulnerable points in a growing network of networks.  -  Coming up with new ways to secure the IoT is among the topics at an upcoming workshop being sponsored by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology. NIST’s Lightweight Cryptography Workshop scheduled for July 20-21 at the Commerce Department agency’s headquarters in Gaithersburg, Md., recognizes that most cryptographic algorithms were designed for server environments. Hence, the agency notes, “many of these algorithms cannot be implemented in the devices used by these applications.”  -  Moreover, trying to modify existing crypto algorithms for sensors, devices and other components of a future networks or the IoT won’t work. “When current algorithms can be engineered to fit into the limited resources of constrained environments, their performance is typically not acceptable,” workshop organizers note.

Hence, the NIST workshop will seek to establish security and resource requirements—power, processing and bandwidth—for a future network of connected sensors as well as terrestrial and airborne devices. The other goal is to come up with a list of basic crypto specs that could serve as industry standards in applications ranging from sensor networks and distributed control systems to the smart power grid and the IoT.

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Baseball's "Hacking" Case: Are You a Hacker Too?

Baseball's "Hacking" Case: Are You a Hacker Too? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
I'm a St. Louis Cardinals fan, so I guess it is fitting that my favorite team becomes embroiled in a big privacy and data security incident.  At the outset, apologies for the feature photo above.  It pulled up under a search for "baseball hacker," and as a collector of ridiculous hacker stock photos, I couldn't resist adding this one to my collection.  I doctored it up by adding in the background, but I applaud the prophetic powers of the photographer who had a vision that one day such an image would be needed. Maybe the photographer wasn't surprised by it, but I cert
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St. Louis Cardinals accused of "hacking" the database of the Houston Astro's - Someone needs to revisit their professional ethics, particularly in light of the level of transparency that we live in our modern era.   I am not trying to make some high and mighty moral argument here, this is more of a, what are the consequences if what you do ends up on the front page, or even the sports page of the New York Times, would you still do whatever it is that is questionable to be there and you be OK with that, or is that the legacy that you want to leave to your children?

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FPC Biometrics Built In To Gionee Smartphone

FPC Biometrics Built In To Gionee Smartphone | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
China-based smartphone manufacturer Gionee has integrated biometric technology from FPC into its new handset: the Elife E8

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
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The company has seen a number of these kinds of integrations lately. Last month, its fingerprint sensors were embedded in the Oppo R7 Plus and the Yulong Coolpad Tiptop Pro mobile devices – both products of China-based developers. While FPC has clearly made a name for itself in that region’s market, a recent collaboration with Google on the development of the Android M OS’s native fingerprint sensor capabilities should also help to bolster FPC’s profile on a more global scale.

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Salesforce's new analytics apps will be tailored for specific roles

Salesforce's new analytics apps will be tailored for specific roles | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The first to arrive is Sales Wave Analytics, targeting salespeople
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Earlier this year the company rolled out a collection of mobile updates to its Wave Analytics Cloud offering, and last month it added a new tool focused on big data. Now, the new line of Wave Analytics Apps is intended to extend the Analytics Cloud further with prepackaged templates designed to empower business users in particular job functions with the ability to find context-specific meaning in their data.  The apps will instantly populate CRM data into role-specific accelerator templates for quick deployment, Salesforce said. They’ll also uncover historical trends and year-over-year comparisons from any device. Because Wave Analytics Apps are natively integrated with the Salesforce1 Platform, predefined data flows will not only enable changes made in the app to be reflected automatically within Salesforce, but will also update all corresponding metrics in Salesforce related to the changes.

The first to arrive in this new line of apps will be Sales Wave Analytics, with a focus on giving salespeople new tools for managing forecasts, pipelines, team performance and more

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Technology to spot gunfire installed in U.S. school

Technology to spot gunfire installed in U.S. school | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
ShotSpotter technology uses microphones that can track the sound of gunfire as it happens and alert police to its location. While advocates say it could help prevent another school massacre, there are privacy concerns. Kris Van Cleave reports.
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ShotSpotter technology uses microphones that can track the sound of gunfire as it happens and alert police to its location. While advocates say it could help prevent another school massacre, there are privacy concerns.

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Without a strong business case, UK councils risk wasting money on the IoT

Without a strong business case, UK councils risk wasting money on the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
From social care to pollution, new technology could create big savings for councils – but only if security and privacy concerns are addressed early
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However, deploying the internet of things can’t be seen as a quick fix: there are inherent risks involved that can’t be ignored in an enthusiastic dash towards whiz-bang tech solutions. Robert Miller, security consultant of MWR InfoSecurity, says security requirements and financial viability will need to be factored in early in the process: “Smart city solutions will likely be designed to run for tens of years to recoup the investment, and this means getting security and privacy concerns right first time.”

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Google’s Nest adds home-monitoring camera to suite of smart-home products

Google’s Nest adds home-monitoring camera to suite of smart-home products | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
‘Our vision was to create a thoughtful home,’ says chief executive Tony Fadell
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A connected home-monitoring camera with microphone, speaker, motion sensors and night-vision, the Nest Cam is a redesigned version of the highly regarded home camera manufactured by Dropcam, which Nest acquired in June 2014 for $555 million.

Shooting video in 1080p high-definition with a wide-angle glass lens and three megapixel sensor, the Nest Cam retails for €199, and can upload 10-30 days worth of continuous video to the newly announced Nest Aware cloud service. The additional Nest Aware cloud service costs either €10 or €30 a month for the different storage options.

Nest also announced a redesigned version of the Nest Protect, a fire, smoke and CO2 alarm, with new sensors to detect fast-spreading fires.  Software announcements included upgraded software for Nest’s original learning thermostat, first launched in 2011, as well as version 5.0 of its mobile app for controlling and interacting with Nest’s suite of products.

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