Internet of Things - Technology focus
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New FLIR One Thermal Imaging Accessory Launched for Android and iOS

New FLIR One Thermal Imaging Accessory Launched for Android and iOS | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The second-generation FLIR One accessory is available for iOS devices at roughly Rs. 16,000, and will go on sale for Android next month.
Richard Platt's insight:

2nd-generation FLIR One plug-in thermal is imaging accessory for Android and iOS devices.  The accessory transforms a mobile device to into a thermal imager that with infrared can show heat images and measures temperature.  The company claims that the FLIR One can show temperature variations of less than a tenth of a degree. "The technology enables a host of practical applications, from identifying energy inefficiencies and water leaks in a home, to enabling safe and enjoyable outdoor exploration,". - The updated FLIR One is now available worldwide at an MSRP of $249.99 for iOS devices, while the Android-compatible version of the FLIR One will be available in July.   -  The company also announced a price cut for its 1st-generation FLIR One for Apple iPhone 5 and iPhone 5s, which will be available at $149.99 when originally launched at $349.  

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Gaétan Franchimont's curator insight, June 27, 2015 7:05 AM

FLIR propose sa seconde génération accessoires pour transformer son smartphone en une caméra à vision thermique.

Bien plus qu'un nouveau gadget, FLIR One permet entre autre de repérer toute perte de chaleur ou fuite d'eau dans une habitation...

 

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Technology conceives the inconceivable

Technology conceives the inconceivable | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A funny thing happened on the way to the internet of things. Many of the “things” got a mind of their own. They also started to be produced in surprising new ways, often at much lower cost, and mutate into forms few anticipated. Technology
Richard Platt's insight:

The internet of things feels like one of those technology revolutions. It was founded on the idea that when inanimate objects, from lightbulbs to complex industrial equipment, are connected to the internet interesting new things will become possible. The expected benefits include being able to control objects more easily. It also increases the ability to lease things out, with payments tied to actual usage, turning the provision of physical goods into a service industry.  -  But the predictable, linear development this implies — an orderly progression that adds value to existing assets and new revenue streams to existing businesses — is not the way technology revolutions normally play out.  For a start, some of the hoped-for benefits have been slow to arrive. True, this is a long-term, highly complex change that will creep slowly into many areas of business and life, from the way cities operate to industrial, home and personal settings. In a report this week, the McKinsey Global Institute predicted that the applications of this technology would be worth $11TN a year by 2025, equivalent to 11% of the global economy by that point.  -  But McKinsey also pointed out that there was a lag in the effects of this technology, similar to the productivity lag that followed the wave of corporate IT automation that started in the 1980s. It takes time for companies to learn how to manage new technologies and for the new business models to emerge.

Part of the problem results from sheer complexity. Some 40% of the benefits from the internet of things depend on deep integration of different systems, according to McKinsey. Also, the world is already awash with data, little of which is actually used. Simply adding equipment to pile up more information will not guarantee a return, says Michael Chui, a partner at the professional services firm.

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Chevrolet Adds Theft Alarm Feature: Now Your Car Can Text You If It's Being Stolen

Chevrolet Adds Theft Alarm Feature: Now Your Car Can Text You If It's Being Stolen | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
General Motors' OnStar service debuted in 1996, just as cell phones were evolving from expensive,...
Richard Platt's insight:

The feature is called "Theft Alarm Notification". Working in tandem with other OnStar services like Stolen Vehicle Slowdown, Theft Alarm Notification boosts the chances that owners will get their cars back after the bad guys (or girls) try to make off with them.  If you're an OnStar subscriber, you can opt-in to Theft Alarm Notification and select how you'd like to be notified when a would-be thief triggers your car alarm. You can choose to receive a text message, email, or phone call. Then, "OnStar advisors will work with local authorities and use GPS technology to pinpoint the vehicle’s location. In certain models, if the conditions are safe, advisors can send a signal to slow down the vehicle, aiding police officers in its recovery and preventing a potential high-speed chase."

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Rakon's new frontier: the IoT

Rakon's new frontier: the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Component maker Rakon is back in growth mode, divesting commodity businesses and focusing on the next big thing.
Richard Platt's insight:

Rakon is hinting at what it describes as a "soon to be released new technology proposition" and signalling it intends to grab a chunk of emerging opportunities presented by the internet of things (IoT).  As a developer of crystal frequency control and timing technologies, Rakon is exposed to some high-growth communications markets, including the worldwide roll-out of 4G. Its components are used in wired, wireless and fibre networks, navigation devices, military systems and satellites.  Rakon said the applications of its technologies in support of the IoT are multiple, including wireless control, machine to machine, smart grids and test and measurement.

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Kaspersky on Smart Fridges: 'Internet of Things? I Call It Internet of Threats'

Kaspersky on Smart Fridges: 'Internet of Things? I Call It Internet of Threats' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In the fourth video of our six-part series, cybersecurity expert Eugene Kaspersky talks about the dangers of what he calls the "Internet of Threats."
Richard Platt's insight:

Video - not an unfair analysis of the threats to the consumer IoT space

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IEEE IoT Initiative Launches “IoT Scenarios” Contributor Program to Explore Real World Applications and Foster IoT Architecture Development

IEEE IoT Initiative Launches “IoT Scenarios” Contributor Program to Explore Real World Applications and Foster IoT Architecture Development | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Interactive platform allows users to engage with use cases, service descriptions, business models, and reference implementations key to developing a vibrant IoT industry. IEEE, the world’s largest professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, announced today that the Future Directions IEEE Internet of Things (IoT) Initiative has launched a new program to foster the ...

Via IoT Business News
Richard Platt's insight:
IEEE, the world’s largest professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, announced today that the Future Directions IEEE Internet of Things (IoT) Initiative has launched a new program to foster the sharing of real world IoT applications across all domains. The IEEE IoT Scenarioscontributor program has been created to help those working in the space get exposure for IoT projects, ideas, and services and to provide a venue for sharing best practices and lessons learned.  Roberto Minerva, chair, IEEE Internet of Things Initiative, said:  “The IoT Scenarios program offers a unique opportunity for individuals and companies working on new and exciting applications driving the development of a wide range of IoT technologies to share their insight and achieve broader industry exposure.”  -  “We encourage those working in the IoT space to contribute to the IEEE IoT Scenarios program and we welcome all IoT-related ideas, whether planned or currently under development.” 
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Gas sensing platform for intuitive IoT applications

Gas sensing platform for intuitive IoT applications | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Leuven (Belgium) and Eindhoven (the Netherlands) – Imec and Holst Centre have developed a small NO2 sensor featuring a low power consumption in the mW range. The sensors have a low detection limit for NO2 (
Richard Platt's insight:

Health issues resulting from poor air quality are a growing concern for consumers and accurate monitoring is becoming more and more in demand, for both outdoor and indoor environments.
Air quality is typically measured on just a few distinct locations per city, with specialized equipment. Many current gas sensors are large in size, have high power consumption and are too cost prohibitive to be implemented on a large scale for I2oT applications. Imec and Holst Centre have developed small, simple, low power and high quality autonomous sensors that wirelessly communicate with the environment and the cloud.  Imec and Holst Centre's NO2 sensors were integrated in the Aireas air quality network, a multiple sensor network in the city center of Eindhoven (the Netherlands). The purpose was to test -in actual outdoor conditions and long term- the stability of the sensors, and benchmark them against established reference sensors. The sensors are operational since early May 2015 and contribute with valuable outdoor sensor data since then. During traffic rush hours, the sensors detect a significant increase of NO2 concentration up to the health safety limits.  Imec and Holst Centre are currently deploying a similar sensor network inside the Holst Centre building in Eindhoven to test the sensors for indoor air quality monitoring. This environmental monitoring platform today includes it proprietary NO2 sensor and commercial sensors for temperature, relative humidity and CO2. The measured levels can be monitored live, over the internet. In a next step, proprietary low-cost low-power sensors will be added for CO2, VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds), ozone, and particle matter.  The generated sensor data are transferred to the cloud, stored in a database and immediately available on (mobile) applications, explained Kathleen Philips, director of imec's perceptive systems for the intuitive internet of things R&D program. "Data fusion methodology and advanced algorithms enable us to combine data from different sensors such as temperature, several gasses, humidity, human presence detection and to derive contextual knowledge. This information contributes to a correct interpretation of the situation and helps us to take adequate.

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The $300 'PITA' steals encryption keys with radio waves

The $300 'PITA'  steals encryption keys with radio waves | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Your computer is leaking information. It's not from the usual suspects: WiFi, Bluetooth or ethernet, but from radio waves originating from your processor
Richard Platt's insight:

This isn't the first time electromagnetic probing has been used to decipher encrypted data or that researchers have used unconventional methods to get into computers.  -  While the researchers jokingly placed the device in a pita, the reality is that someone could place one of these devices under the desk of a targeted subject to steal their encryption passkey. Fortunately, the researches alerted GnuPG developers about the attack and worked with them to adjust the software's algorithm. So you're safe for now. But keep a look out for errant pita sandwiches at the local Starbucks.

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'Smallest SoC for IoT' Adds Memory

'Smallest SoC for IoT' Adds Memory | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Freescale's new i.MX 6D SoC is called a Single Chip System Module, (SCM) because it also has a 1-gigaByte Micron low-power double data rate chip stacked on top of three Freescale die for its dual ARM Cortex-A9 cores, power management chip and 16 megaByte of serial peripheral interface NOR flash nonvolatile memory.
Richard Platt's insight:

A new category of chip has dawned upon the semiconductor industry according to Freescale. One step beyond the familiar system-on-chip (SoC), this new category dubbed Single Chip System Module (SCM) includes everything an SoC contains, plus gigaBytes of DRAM stacked on top along with a power management chip and flash memory chip alongside its dual ARM Cortex-A9 application processors.  -  As a result, Freescale claims a 50% reduction in board space and a 25% faster-to-market metric, plus the ability to do predictive data analytics with its first model of the new family of SCMs, the i.MX 6D.  -  "Right now the first model is for plugged-in Internet of Things [IoT] and graphics hubs, but the whole family will be expanded into portables, wearables, autonomous sensing nodes, and automotive applications soon," said Nancy Fares, vice president of system solution products speaking in advance of the Freescale Technology Form 2015

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NHSTA Safety inspectors can't spot the next major vehicle problem

NHSTA Safety inspectors can't spot the next major vehicle problem | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The overworked inspectors responsible for identifying safety shortcomings in cars failed to note problems with ignition switches in GM cars and lack the resources and protocols to pinpoint future safety problems, according to a new report and congressional testimony Tuesday by the Department of Transportation’s top watchdog.
Richard Platt's insight:

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Office of Defects Investigation missed opportunities to investigate problems in GM cars with airbags and ignition switches, which have been linked to over 100 deaths, Inspector General Calvin Scovel told a Senate hearing. The accompanying report was commissioned in response to GM’s recall of 8.7 million vehicles for faulty ignition switches in order to assess whether the NHTSA should have identified problems earlier.

Senators immediately criticized the agency.  -  Failure to properly collect, interpret, and investigate data “resulted in significant safety concerns being overlooked,” Scovel said.  -  The investigative office fails to verify information provided by car manufactures, despite knowing that reports sometimes mischaracterize and downplay incidents – for example, avoiding use of the word “fire,” in accident reports – according to the report.  -  Auditors were told the office relies on the honor system. Note - they are not using a method or process that helps them to identify potential failures, something that is known as Predictive Failure or also known as Anticipatory Failure Analysis.

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600 million Samsung Galaxy phones exposed to hackers

600 million Samsung Galaxy phones exposed to hackers | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Researchers say nearly every Samsung Galaxy phone -- going back to the S3 in 2012 -- is vulnerable to hackers.
Richard Platt's insight:

Researchers at NowSecure, a cybersecurity firm, say they told Samsung about the vulnerability in November. Seven months later, nothing has been fixed. That's why NowSecure made its findings public last Tuesday.  How serious is this problem? NowSecure CEO Andrew Hoog said that, on a well-established system that ranks cybersecurity problems from 1 to 10, this vulnerability stood at 8.3.
NowSecure said it tested several Galaxy models on many different cell phone carriers. All were vulnerable. Assuming every Galaxy out there is the same, NowSecure estimates 600 million devices are affected.  -  The problem involves the word prediction software used by Samsung devices. It's made by British tech firm SwiftKey, which Samsung installs in devices at the factory.  Last year, NowSecure researchers discovered that the SwiftKey keyboard can be tricked to accept a malicious file when the software updates. Because of the way the keyboard is installed, that virus can access some of the deepest, core parts of the phone's computer system.

With that level of access, a hacker can then do pretty much anything to your phone.  -  This hack isn't easy. But it's a tactic for cyberattackers on a mission with lots of money and access WiFi or cell networks. One possible target? Company executives traveling to countries, such as China, where the government routinely spies on visitors to steal their business plans.

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NSA Has Reverse-Engineered Popular Consumer Anti-Virus Software In Order To Track Users

NSA Has Reverse-Engineered Popular Consumer Anti-Virus Software In Order To Track Users | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The NSA and its British counterpart the GCHQ have put extensive effort into hacking popular security software products to “track users and infiltrate..
Richard Platt's insight:

The NSA and its British counterpart the GCHQ have put extensive effort into hacking popular security software products to “track users and infiltrate networks,” according to the latest round of Snowden docs unearthed today by The Intercept.  -  Cybersecurity companies, including the Moscow-headquartered Kaspersky Lab, were targeted by government agencies to gain intelligence of the latest exploits. Details of the security software’s inner workings were deciphered by agencies through a process called software reverse engineering (SRE), which allowed them to analyze and exploit the software suites.  -  A top-secret warrant renewal request issued by the GCHQ details the motivations behind infiltrating the products of such anti-virus companies.  -  “Personal security products such as the Russian anti-virus software Kaspersky continue to pose a challenge to GCHQ’s CNE [Computer Network Exploitation] capability,” the warrant stated, “and SRE is essential in order to be able to exploit such software and to prevent detection of our activities.”  -  A leaked 2010 presentation called “Project CAMBERDADA” also suggested that the government agencies may be searching through and flagging the emails of employees from cybersecurity firms in order to identify more of these threats.

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Meet Tesla's new weapon - a Battery Scientist

Meet Tesla's new weapon - a Battery Scientist | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The path to cheaper, longer lasting, more powerful lithium-ion batteries might be through this guy.
Richard Platt's insight:

Tesla Motors has signed a 5-year exclusive partnership this week with Jeff Dahn, a leading lithium-ion battery researcher and professor at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia. Dahn is currently working on a project funded by 3M and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to develop longer lasting, lower cost lithium-ion battery cells. The exclusive partnership with Tesla will begin in June 2016, once Dahn has completed the 3M research project.  -  Dahn’s focus won’t just be cost, nor will his research apply only to the lithium-ion batteries used in Tesla’s electric cars. His research team aims to increase both the energy density — or the amount of energy that can be stored in a battery per its volume — and the lifetime of lithium-ion cells, which could, in turn, help drive down costs in automotive and grid energy storage applications.

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What Happens to all the Big Data that Internet of Things Collects?

What Happens to all the Big Data that Internet of Things Collects? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The combination of Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT) is powerful, and integrated into our lives in more ways already than one might think.
Richard Platt's insight:

Consider the following:  -  Data points collected from consumer devices can be used to create a fully automated and proactive customer service platform. This represents an entirely new level of automation, going far beyond simple auto-responses. It anticipates needs, spots trends, and addresses problems before they occur.
Data collected from devices can be part of a continuous improvement practice. Fed back to the engineering or design team, this data helps improve the product line to better meet customers’ needs, increasing customer loyalty.    -  This powerful combination also creates new revenue opportunities. By understanding customers and their wants and needs, and spotting growing trends, the company will be able to roll out new products or services that already have built-up demand.  -  Even more powerful is the fact that the data collected from individual devices can be combined and presented in a common platform – giving companies the ability to understand, for example, what products each customer is using or not using, what else they might need or desire, and creating a truly integrated and intelligent support platform.  -  The potential is already at hand to leverage IoT to redefine the customer experience, create a tighter link between customer and provider, and deliver a more synchronized and intelligent support environment.

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Internet of things is overhyped and should instead be called internet with things

Internet of things is overhyped and should instead be called internet with things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Cisco believes there will be 50 billion devices connected to the internet by 2050 (more than five per person).
Richard Platt's insight:

Healthcare, pollution and transport could all be greatly improved if there were trusted platforms that people were willing to share data over, according to Beighton, but this is far from today’s reality.

Instead, Beighton believes there will be isolated “communities of things” that are connected to the internet, largely because they will all work on different standards, thereby meaning they can't talk to each other.  Keep said governments have a role to play in connecting things to the internet, adding that UK spend on the internet of things (roughly £40 million) is dwarfed by Germany, a nation spending billions on IoT research and development.

“They’re concerned about losing their manufacturing to other low cost countries,” said Keep. “They put a lot of money into research.”

A number of UK startups are aiming to launch businesses off the idea that everything is connected to the internet. One such company is opensensors.io, founded by Yodit Stanton.who said the UK government is keen to help startups like hers but claimed that it moves too slowly.  “I think there is a will,” she said. “But the pace they move at for me as a startup is too slow. Six months is a lifetime. We have to move. That kind of connection isn’t there in terms of understanding the pace.”

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iPhones hit with 'blue screens of death'

iPhones hit with 'blue screens of death' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Users of Apple's iPhone on T-Mobile's network are reportedly suffering from random "blue screens of death."
Richard Platt's insight:

Blue screen of death problems appear to affect a wide spectrum of Apple devices ranging from the iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6 and iPhone 5s, says MacRumors, and the restarts occur at 10 minute to 30 minute intervals. The problem affects several versions of iOS 8 including iOS 8.3.  Complaints keep piling in. Some users are saying they problem is solved by turning off Wi-Fi calling. Yet others are resorting to a complete hard reset.  Quality issues aren’t what a stock trying to retake its high needs. Earlier this week, the company said it would replace malfunctioning hard disk drives in iMac PCs.

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Internet of Everything on display at Pan Am Games 2015

Internet of Everything on display at Pan Am Games 2015 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It was almost one year ago today that Jeff Seifert stood next to a giant, colourful, and connected clock in Toronto’s Nathan
Richard Platt's insight:

The event, which claims to be the 3rd-largest amateur sports event ever and larger in scope than the Vancouver Olympics, features Cisco as a title sponsor. The vendor of networking communications technology plans to use the opportunity to showcase the power of the “Internet of Everything,” a term that it uses to describe the trend of connected devices and the resulting sea of data generated by them. Even the clock is connected via high-capacity fibre, and offers information kiosk capabilities as a result. A year ago, Seifert even hinted it would facilitate video chats between athletes and pedestrians.  -  Behind the scenes, Cisco is running the network for the various games venues that stretch across southwestern Ontario. Seifert anticipates a huge demand on the networks during the events. With 17 days left on the countdown clock, he’s talking about the importance that it all work when the games are on.

“Whether it be Wi-Fi for our spectators, whether it be the scoreboards, or the results for the athletes, really it can not fail,” he says. “There is a tremendous community of users that come together … there’s athletes, spectators, and media, but there are a lot of sports organizations involved as well. The demands on the raw power of the network are increasing with every competition.”

Working with Seifert and Cisco is Brian Cook, vice-president of IT for the TO2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games. A veteran of major live sporting events including the 2012 London Olympics and past Pan Am Games, Cook is ready to turn the key on firing up a huge IT operation for the duration of the event. Deploying wireless networks, radio coverage, boosting cell coverage, and installing computer systems are all part and parcel of the requirements.

“You’re looking at a crushed time frame,” he says. “Because the venues have exclusive access, we’re looking to bump this equipment in a 15-day time frame.”  The budget isn’t exactly generous. Cook’s team has $77 million to work with – compare that to about $1 billion for the London Olympics – so it will be looking to lean on Cisco’s sponsorship to be as effective as possible. Cisco has tapped its network of partners to assist with the effort and has even tapped its Cisco Networking Academy to chip in. That educational initiative will see college and high school students assigned to working at different venues, supported by a mentor from Cisco.

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Human Organs-on-Chips wins Design of the Year 2015

Human Organs-on-Chips wins Design of the Year 2015 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Microdevices that replicate the functions of human organs crowned Design of the Year 2015 by London's Design Museum

Via S. Diez de Medina Ph.D.
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Developed by Donald Ingber and Dan Dongeun Huh from Harvard University's Wyss Institute, the tiny microchip-like devices are lined with human cells to mimic the complex tissue structures of human organs.  -  The Organs-on-Chips are designed to be used for purposes including drugs and cosmetics testing, as well as for the treatment of infections and inherited diseases.

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Unlocking the potential of the IoT from McKinsey

Unlocking the potential of the IoT from McKinsey | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
If policy makers and businesses get it right, linking the physical and digital worlds could generate up to $11.1 trillion a year in economic value by 2025. A McKinsey Global Institute article.

Via judycurtis
Richard Platt's insight:

Achieving this kind of $4 -$11Trillion impact would require certain conditions to be in place, notably overcoming the technical, organizational, and regulatory hurdles. In particular, companies that use IoT technology will play a critical role in developing the right systems and processes to maximize its value. Among their findings:


  • Interoperability between IoT systems is critical. Of the total potential economic value the IoT enables, interoperability is required for 40 percent on average and for nearly 60 percent in some settings.
  • Currently, most IoT data are not used. For example, on an oil rig that has 30,000 sensors, only 1 percent of the data are examined. That’s because this information is used mostly to detect and control anomalies—not for optimization and prediction, which provide the greatest value.
  • Business-to-business applications will probably capture more value—nearly 70 percent of it—than consumer uses, although consumer applications, such as fitness monitors and self-driving cars, attract the most attention and can create significant value, too.
  • The IoT has a large potential in developing economies. Still, we estimate that it will have a higher overall value impact in advanced economies because of the higher value per use. However, developing economies could generate nearly 40 percent of the IoT’s value, and nearly half in some settings.
  • Customers will capture most of the benefits. We estimate that IoT users (businesses, other organizations, and consumers) could capture 90 percent of the value that IoT applications generate. For example, in 2025 remote monitoring could create as much as $1.1 trillion a year in value by improving the health of chronic-disease patients.
  • A dynamic industry is evolving around IoT technology. As in other technology waves, both incumbents and new players have opportunities. Digitization blurs the lines between technology companies and other types of businesses; makers of industrial machinery, for example, are creating new business models by using IoT links and data to offer their products as a service.
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judycurtis's curator insight, June 25, 2015 11:14 AM

McKinsey has analyzed over 150 use cases to evaluate the impact of the IoT, and to give a view upon which industries are primed to reap the benefits. Factories and cities are in the top tier. Surprising?

 

(Note: the executive summary and the full report are available for download.)

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How Can the Internet of Things Fight Fires?

How Can the Internet of Things Fight Fires? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Firefighters might have embedded sensors in their protective suits, alerting them about external temperatures and chemicals.
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Research Roadmap for Smart Fire Fighting, which lays out how the Internet of Things can aid first responders. The report was written in conjunction with the Fire Protection Research Foundation, the research affiliate of the National Fire Protection Association.  Other "cyber-physical systems" mentioned in the report include robots, (like those being researched by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) that could navigate debris or conditions too dangerous for humans, and technology that could gather information about the scene from smart appliances located at potential disaster sites, such as air conditioning units, elevators, sprinklers and other devices.  -  This information could be used before, during and after specific incidents according to the report -- possibly to determine the fastest route to a scene, or examine floor plans, for instance.  -  For many of the 1 million firefighters in the United States today, information about emergency situations "becomes apparent piecemeal -- neither collected nor processed in a systematic fashion," the report said. "Small teams of fire fighters analyze their immediate situation, based on locally collected data, and take action based solely on that analysis."

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Lenovo Challenges Intel With $129 PC on a Stick

Lenovo Challenges Intel With $129 PC on a Stick | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Plug it into the living room flat-screen TV, carry it to the office, or drop it into a suitcase during your next trip.
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Lenovo's Ideacentre Stick 300 - a portable gadget works with HDMI-compatible devices. Plug it into the living room flat-screen TV, carry it to the office, or drop it into a suitcase during your next trip.  - "We've looked at the computing needs of travelers, business people and families, and realized that a truly portable and affordable solution would be a significant benefit to users of all kinds," Jun Ouyang, VP and GM of Worldwide Desktop and Visuals at Lenovo, said in a statement.  -  The $129 ($20 less than the Intel version) dongle transforms almost any HDMI-compatible TV or monitor into a functioning Windows-based PC. Just attach a 2.4GHz wireless keyboard and mouse, and you'll be ready to create documents, surf the Web, and update social media.  -  "Imagine transforming the traditional TV in a vacation rental into a small multi-media hub, capable of streaming a movie, video chatting with relatives or editing a work document on the fly. Convert the dusty monitor lurking in a spare bedroom into a Web-enabled homework station, or transform a coveted man-cave into a home cinema."

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Samsung's New Thin Clients to Use AMD's System on Chip

Samsung's New Thin Clients to Use AMD's System on Chip | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With cloud based apps gaining prominence within organizations around the globe, the world of desktop computing must react accordingly. Instead of using a t
Richard Platt's insight:

With cloud based apps gaining prominence within organizations around the globe, the world of desktop computing must react accordingly. Instead of using a traditional desktop computer, many businesses are implementing thin clients instead.  -  Samsung has decided to capitalize on this trend by offering a new lineup of thin clients that are built using AMD’s System on Chip (SoC) technology. Samsung specifically mentions that the new TC222W and TC242W product lineups will contain AMD’s SoC technology, which further streamlines thin client architecture. Samsung says that the AMD SoC is built for low power consumption, while simultaneously providing high performance for the end user. Samsung notes that these lineups will begin to hit the market in the 3rd quarter of 2015.

“Samsung’s powerful Windows Thin Client Cloud displays combine professional, ergonomic design with advanced thin-client technology to drive better manageability, security and business efficiency through a dedicated Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI),” says Seog-Gi Kim, SVP of Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics.

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High-tech trap to catch graffiti vandals in the act

Graffiti on public transport is a problem the world over. But Sydney is having dramatic success at reducing the amount of graffiti on its trains. How are they doing it? By setting a trap to catch vandals in the act. Lester Ranby reports.
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When vapor levels from paint or marker pens reach a certain level, camera's switch on and triggers the police via their smartphone that someone has vandalized the train (where the "mouse trap" is deployed), the vandal then gets arrested - Sydney has deployed this technology and will now expand it to more trains as a result of the pilot program.

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Software Containers Are Bringing the Tech Giants Together

Software Containers Are Bringing the Tech Giants Together | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Tech giants, including Amazon, Google and Microsoft, have formed a new organization to create an open source standard for software containers.
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Software containers are poised to do the same thing for the web that shipping containers did for logistics. They make it far easier to move applications from the individual laptops and workstations where they are coded to the vast clusters of computers that serve those applications to customers. Now, a who’s who of tech companies, including Amazon, Google and Microsoft, have formed a new organization called the Open Container Project to create an open source standard for software containers.  -  But the biggest names in this effort are not the most important. That distinction belongs to Docker and CoreOS, the two companies most closely associated with container technology that until now have been working to develop competing systems. By bringing the two companies together, the open source community aims to avoid compatibility nightmares that can arise when competitors offer similar products. A single, open standard can also keep users from being locked in to a specific product. The end result, ideally, is the kind of worldwide efficiency for software that shipping containers offer for physical stuff.

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Samsung's 'See-Through' Truck Aims to Make Roads Safer

Samsung's 'See-Through' Truck Aims to Make Roads Safer | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Samsung wants to leverage its technological expertise to make the roads a safer place.
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Samsung wants to leverage its technological expertise to make the roads a safer place.  -  It's a situation most drivers have experienced plenty of times: You're driving down a two-lane highway, stuck behind a slow-moving semi truck and unsure if it's safe to drive in the opposite lane to pass the vehicle.   -  A prototype truck designed by Samsung shows how the South Korean electronics company hopes to leverage technology to make the oversize vehicles seemingly transparent.  -  A front-facing camera with night vision capability projects what the semi driver is seeing in front of them. The live video images is then projected onto the back of the truck, showing drivers behind the semi when it is or is not safe for them to pass - We are impressed that Samsung has gone this far, there is value to their prototype for trucking firms, trailer manufacturers, and probably most importantly the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) which recommend this technology as a safety requirement for models of trucks - Way to Go Samsung- well done on demonstrating the value to the public at large.

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