Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Self-driving taxi service proves popular with California seniors

Self-driving taxi service proves popular with California seniors | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Perhaps having noted the kind of battles some self-driving car outfits have had in getting their technology onto state roads, driverless vehicle firm Voyager opted for a more creative solution: Test the cars in a retirement community.


Via Karolina Maria Chachulska
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The new firm, spun out of online learning company Udacity earlier this year, has deployed its first self-driving taxi service at The Villages, a gated community with around 4,000 elderly residents in San Jose, California, the NY Times reports.

It’s a smart move that allows Voyage’s growing team of engineers — some ex-Google and Apple — to test their technology in a controlled environment where life moves at a fairly steady and predictable pace, save for the occasional golf cart speeding by. And of course, this particular demographic will benefit hugely from the technology, as losing the ability to drive due to age drastically reduces an elderly person’s independence, affecting their ability to stay active, go places, and meet friends.  Voyage is testing its kit with two modified Ford Fusions on 15 miles of road with a 25 mph speed limit, the New York Times said. While testing on the open road can mean having to jump through lots of regulatory hoops, The Villages’ private location means there have been fewer obstacles for Voyage to navigate in bringing its technology onto the streets.  An increasing number of companies are opting to try out their driverless vehicles in controlled environments on specific routes, rather than out on regular roads that are busier and faster, and present more hazards. French firm Navya, for example, is about to start testing autonomous shuttles within the grounds of the University of Michigan, while Apple may start testing its own self-driving tech with shuttles ferrying its workers between buildings.

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How games help fight depression to boost leadership - ETtech

How games help fight depression to boost leadership - ETtech | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Through IoT-based techniques, escape game companies offer a twist to entertainment
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Escape games involve locking about half a dozen players in a 200-250 sqft room for an hour. The storyline setting in the room ranges from prison break and vampire attacks to Egyptian tombs and ticking time-bombs. Participants are invited to crack complex puzzles.  Now, escape game facilities in Bengaluru are going beyond conventional immersive adventure experiences to design games that benefit different segments of the community. Escape game joint Breakout recently launched an internet of things (IoT)-enabled facility in Koramangala, which is full of movement sensors, flashlights, funky crystal balls and touch-enabled panels.  “The games are designed for women to assume leadership roles while solving clues. It becomes a platform for gender parity of sorts," said Hareesh Mothi, founder.  He is in talks with the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (Nimhans) to introduce these games for people suffering from depression. “Sounds and sensors trigger a positive sense of accomplishment. This offers a certain degree of emotional high for people who are low," he said.   Escape games are nascent but burgeoning businesses. While there were just two players in 2015, over eight escape game centres have sprung up in Bengaluru today. These moderate-cost ventures are usually self-funded, because apart from setting up the facility, technology upgradation is the only key expenditure.
Corporates on the lookout for offbeat employee team-building activities are large business drivers. For instance, while Indiranagar-based Mystery Rooms has clients in Google, Intel, Visa, Adobe, IBM and Deloitte, Riddle Room hosts an average of 12 companies and startups per month. Escape games are part of the annual induction process at Microsoft.  Bibhav Behera, e-commerce head at Wildcraft, is planning a team-building outing at an escape room facility. Behera had introduced the concept to staffers during his previous stint at online marketplace Snapdeal.“Our monotonous work environment often stifles creative thinking. Such games help colleagues bond, rack their brains and push them to think out of the box."  Escape rooms also talk about facilitating multi-generational communication. R Venkatraman, founder, Riddle Room, has organised over 100 birthday parties, bachelorette parties and family gatherings since 2015. Games are also customised on request. “People are hassled to do something special for their loved one. So we have packages on offer that take the stress out of organising parties," he said.

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Mining industry 'poised for rapid IoT adoption'

Mining industry 'poised for rapid IoT adoption' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New research by mobile satellite firm Inmarsat found that 40 per cent of mining companies plan to deploy IoT solutions within the next 18 months
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Improving the health and safety of staff is a big driver behind the mining industry’s move towards automation and IoT, new research has found.  Global mobile satellite company Inmarsat said that automation and wearable technology are expected to play a significant role in addressing potential health risks and safety threats in the mining industry.  Inmarsat’s ‘The Future of IoT in Enterprise – 2017’ report found that, despite low current levels of IoT deployment in the mining industry, 40 per cent of organisations have plans to deploy IoT solutions within the next 18 months.  Health and safety emerged as the area in which mining respondents expect to see the most benefits from these deployments, with almost half (44 per cent) expecting IoT to drive improvements to the health and safety of staff.  Improving health and safety also emerged as a key driver for IoT deployment, with 43 per cent ranking it as a primary objective for their IoT strategy, just behind monitoring environmental changes (47 per cent) and improving cost effectiveness (44 per cent).  Joe Carr, director of mining at Inmarsat Enterprise, said: “Mines are a uniquely specialised, hazardous environment and as such miners are highly focused on employee safety.  “IoT solutions can play a significant role by remotely monitoring conditions and gathering data to anticipate and react to potential safety threats.”

“Automation and connected wearable technology represent two of the single best opportunities to address the dangers of the mining environment.  “IoT technology provides the digital nerve system for a network of automated devices and sensors that adjust to environmental conditions in real-time, meaning that equipment can react to potentially hazardous physical changes onsite rapidly without the need for human intervention, removing staff from potentially dangerous environments.”

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Applied Machine Learning: The Less Confusing Guide

Applied Machine Learning: The Less Confusing Guide | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A definitive collection of key concepts, definitions, resources, and tools that I find useful when navigating the vast field of machine learning.
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For the past two years or so I've had an on-again, off-again fascination with machine learning. As with most things you learn, I've had to constantly re-learn certain concepts and lessons every time I've decided to try sometime new. So, I've compiled a definitive collection of key concepts, definitions, resources, and tools that I find useful when navigating this complex field. Hopefully, this will be of use to others getting into the wonderful (and sometimes frustrating) world of machine learning.

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Google Glass' unexpected yet successful turnaround

Google Glass' unexpected yet successful turnaround | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

News, voices and jobs for CIOs. Optimized for your mobile phone.
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Google's bet on Glass may yet pay off as augmented reality and virtual reality spending is predicted to increase from 2017's 11.4 billion to $215 billion by 2021. The company already faces competition from Microsoft and Intel in wearable enterprise tech, and other competitors like Amazon and VMware are gearing up their own wearable capabilities.  Google counts GE, Agco, DHL and Sutter health among its enterprise Glass clients. Retail and education are currently the largest market for the tech, but manufacturing, construction and professional services are opening their doors too. GE's recent test of Google Glass in factories assembling engines demonstrated the technology's use in reducing human error and improving efficiency.

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Fast IoT Prototyping and Assembly 

Fast IoT Prototyping and Assembly  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
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The chiplet notion appears to date back to 2013, when Xerox PARC issued a new vision involving miniscule chiplets that could be assembled even by turning them into ink. That latter part of the vision is not part of the zGlue solution, but they’ve adopted the chiplet notion as silicon embodiments of IP blocks.

This raises the obvious question, “Where would I obtain said chiplets?” And, if you’re a modern practitioner of technology, you respond with the obvious answer: “From a chiplet store, duh!” Which would, of course, be online. This is what zGlue is building as part of their support ecosystem; they call it the ZiPlet Store.

An Active Substrate

If we look at the old Aptix technology, it consisted of antifuses that would be blown where a connection was desired. That’s it. For sensitive signals, the resistance and capacitance of those connections would require inclusion in any electrical analysis, as signal quality might be affected.

The zGlue approach appears to be quite different. Rather than thinking of this as an interposer or strictly as a connection matrix, it’s better to think of it as a full-on chip that happens to have lots of landing sites on the top for the chiplets. So, for example, the signals are actively managed, although I don’t have details as to how that’s done. There are even built-in passives that can be connected per the requirements of any chiplet.

And, if that’s not enough, there’s also a built-in power management block. So we have a fair bit of analog circuitry acting in a support role.

In yet another departure from Aptix, the connections will not survive a power down. They must be re-established at power-up; they say that the configuration time is in the range of micro- to milliseconds.

The design idea, then, for users of this technology, is that, using a tool called zCAD, you take the chiplets you obtained from the store and you drag-and-drop them into place. The tool then automatically routes the connections.

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Team builds flexible new platform for high-performance electronics

Team builds flexible new platform for high-performance electronics | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A team of University of Wisconsin–Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world -- and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that’s easily scalable to the commercial level.
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Transistors are ubiquitous building blocks of modern electronics. The UW–Madison group’s advance is a twist on a two-decade-old industry standard: a BiCMOS (bipolar complementary metal oxide semiconductor) thin-film transistor, which combines two very different technologies — and speed, high current and low power dissipation in the form of heat and wasted energy — all on one surface.  As a result, these “mixed-signal” devices (with both analog and digital capabilities) deliver both brains and brawn and are the chip of choice for many of today’s portable electronic devices, including cellphones.  “The industry standard is very good,” says Zhenqiang (Jack) Ma, the Lynn H. Matthias Professor and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in electrical and computer engineering at UW–Madison. “Now we can do the same things with our transistor — but it can bend.”  Ma is a world leader in high-frequency flexible electronics. He and his collaborators described their advance in the inaugural issue of the journal npj Flexible Electronics, published Sept. 27.  Making traditional BiCMOS flexible electronics is difficult, in part because the process takes several months and requires a multitude of delicate, high-temperature steps. Even a minor variation in temperature at any point could ruin all of the previous steps.  Ma and his collaborators fabricated their flexible electronics on a single-crystal silicon nanomembrane on a single bendable piece of plastic. The secret to their success is their unique process, which eliminates many steps and slashes both the time and cost of fabricating the transistors.  “In industry, they need to finish these in three months,” he says. “We finished it in a week.”

He says his group’s much simpler high-temperature process can scale to industry-level production right away.  “The key is that parameters are important,” he says. “One high-temperature step fixes everything — like glue. Now, we have more powerful mixed-signal tools. Basically, the idea is for flexible electronics to expand with this. The platform is getting bigger.”

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Gartner Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2018 - Smarter With Gartner

Gartner Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2018 - Smarter With Gartner | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence, immersive experiences, digital twins, event-thinking and continuous adaptive security create a foundation for the next generation of digital business models and ecosystems.
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The first three strategic technology trends explore how artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning are seeping into virtually everything and represent a major battleground for technology providers over the next five years. The next four trends focus on blending the digital and physical worlds to create an immersive, digitally enhanced environment. The last three refer to exploiting connections between an expanding set of people and businesses, as well as devices, content and services to deliver digital business outcomes.

The top 10 strategic technology trends for 2018 are:

AI Foundation:  Creating systems that learn, adapt and potentially act autonomously will be a major battleground for technology vendors through at least 2020. The ability to use AI to enhance decision making, reinvent business models and ecosystems, and remake the customer experience will drive the payoff for digital initiatives through 2025.   “AI techniques are evolving rapidly and organizations will need to invest significantly in skills, processes and tools to successfully exploit these techniques and build AI-enhanced systems,” said Mr. Cearley. “Investment areas can include data preparation, integration, algorithm and training methodology selection, and model creation. Multiple constituencies including data scientists, developers and business process owners will need to work together.”

Intelligent Apps and Analytics:  Over the next few years, virtually every app, application and service will incorporate some level of AI. Some of these apps will be obvious intelligent apps that could not exist without AI and machine learning. Others will be unobtrusive users of AI that provide intelligence behind the scenes. Intelligent apps create a new intelligent intermediary layer between people and systems and have the potential to transform the nature of work and the structure of the workplace.

“Explore intelligent apps as a way of augmenting human activity and not simply as a way of replacing people,” said Mr. Cearley. “Augmented analytics is a particularly strategic growing area which uses machine learning to automate data preparation, insight discovery and insight sharing for a broad range of business users, operational workers and citizen data scientists.”   AI has become the next major battleground in a wide range of software and service markets, including aspects of enterprise resource planning (ERP). Packaged software and service providers should outline how they’ll be using AI to add business value in new versions in the form of advanced analytics, intelligent processes and advanced user experiences.

Intelligent Things:  Intelligent things are physical things that go beyond the execution of rigid programming models to exploit AI to deliver advanced behaviors and interact more naturally with their surroundings and with people. AI is driving advances for new intelligent things (such as autonomous vehicles, robots and drones) and delivering enhanced capability to many existing things (such as Internet of Things [IoT] connected consumer and industrial systems).   “Currently, the use of autonomous vehicles in controlled settings (for example, in farming and mining) is a rapidly growing area of intelligent things. We are likely to see examples of autonomous vehicles on limited, well-defined and controlled roadways by 2022, but general use of autonomous cars will likely require a person in the driver’s seat in case the technology should unexpectedly fail,” said Mr. Cearley. “For at least the next five years, we expect that semiautonomous scenarios requiring a driver will dominate. During this time, manufacturers will test the technology more rigorously, and the nontechnology issues such as regulations, legal issues and cultural acceptance will be addressed.” 

Digital Twin:  digital twin refers to the digital representation of a real-world entity or system. Digital twins in the context of IoT projects is particularly promising over the next three to five years and is leading the interest in digital twins today. Well-designed digital twins of assets have the potential to significantly improve enterprise decision making. These digital twins are linked to their real-world counterparts and are used to understand the state of the thing or system, respond to changes, improve operations and add value. Organizations will implement digital twins simply at first, then evolve them over time, improving their ability to collect and visualize the right data, apply the right analytics and rules, and respond effectively to business objectives.  “Over time, digital representations of virtually every aspect of our world will be connected dynamically with their real-world counterpart and with one another and infused with AI-based capabilities to enable advanced simulation, operation and analysis,” said Mr. Cearley. “City planners, digital marketers, healthcare professionals and industrial planners will all benefit from this long-term shift to the integrated digital twin world.”

Cloud to the Edge:  Edge computing describes a computing topology in which information processing, and content collection and delivery, are placed closer to the sources of this information. Connectivity and latency challenges, bandwidth constraints and greater functionality embedded at the edge favors distributed models. Enterprises should begin using edge design patterns in their infrastructure architectures — particularly for those with significant IoT elements.   While many view cloud and edge as competing approaches, cloud is a style of computing where elastically scalable technology capabilities are delivered as a service and does not inherently mandate a centralized model.

“When used as complementary concepts, cloud can be the style of computing used to create a service-oriented model and a centralized control and coordination structure with edge being used as a delivery style allowing for disconnected or distributed process execution of aspects of the cloud service,”  

Conversational Platforms:  Conversational platforms will drive the next big paradigm shift in how humans interact with the digital world. The burden of translating intent shifts from user to computer. The platform takes a question or command from the user and then responds by executing some function, presenting some content or asking for additional input. Over the next few years, conversational interfaces will become a primary design goal for user interaction and be delivered in dedicated hardware, core OS features, platforms and applications.   “Conversational platforms have reached a tipping point in terms of understanding language and basic user intent, but they still fall short,” said Mr. Cearley. “The challenge that conversational platforms face is that users must communicate in a very structured way, and this is often a frustrating experience. A primary differentiator among conversational platforms will be the robustness of their conversational models and the application programming interface (API) and event models used to access, invoke and orchestrate third-party services to deliver complex outcomes.” 

Immersive Experience:  While conversational interfaces are changing how people control the digital world, virtual, augmented and mixed reality are changing the way that people perceive and interact with the digital world. The virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) market is currently adolescent and fragmented. Interest is high, resulting in many novelty VR applications that deliver little real business value outside of advanced entertainment, such as video games and 360-degree spherical videos. To drive real tangible business benefit, enterprises must examine specific real-life scenarios where VR and AR can be applied to make employees more productive and enhance the design, training and visualization processes.

Mixed reality, a type of immersion that merges and extends the technical functionality of both AR and VR, is emerging as the immersive experience of choice providing a compelling technology that optimizes its interface to better match how people view and interact with their world. Mixed reality exists along a spectrum and includes head-mounted displays (HMDs) for augmented or virtual reality as well as smartphone and tablet-based AR and use of environmental sensors. Mixed reality represents the span of how people perceive and interact with the digital world.

Blockchain:  Blockchain is evolving from a digital currency infrastructure into a platform for digital transformation. Blockchain technologies offer a radical departure from the current centralized transaction and record-keeping mechanisms and can serve as a foundation of disruptive digital business for both established enterprises and startups. Although the hype surrounding blockchains originally focused on the financial services industry, blockchains have many potential applications, including government, healthcare, manufacturing, media distribution, identity verification, title registry and supply chain. Although it holds long-term promise and will undoubtedly create disruption, blockchain promise outstrips blockchain reality, and many of the associated technologies are immature for the next two to three years.

Event Driven:  Central to digital business is the idea that the business is always sensing and ready to exploit new digital business moments. Business events could be anything that is noted digitally, reflecting the discovery of notable states or state changes, for example, completion of a purchase order, or an aircraft landing. With the use of event brokers, IoT, cloud computing, blockchain, in-memory data management and AI, business events can be detected faster and analyzed in greater detail. But technology alone without cultural and leadership change does not deliver the full value of the event-driven model. Digital business drives the need for IT leaders, planners and architects to embrace event thinking.

Continuous Adaptive Risk and Trust:  To securely enable digital business initiatives in a world of advanced, targeted attacks, security and risk management leaders must adopt a continuous adaptive risk and trust assessment (CARTA) approach to allow real-time, risk and trust-based decision making with adaptive responses. Security infrastructure must be adaptive everywhere, to embrace the opportunity — and manage the risks — that comes delivering security that moves at the speed of digital business.

As part of a CARTA approach, organizations must overcome the barriers between security teams and application teams, much as DevOps tools and processes overcome the divide between development and operations. Information security architects must integrate security testing at multiple points into DevOps workflows in a collaborative way that is largely transparent to developers, and preserves the teamwork, agility and speed of DevOps and agile development environments, delivering “DevSecOps.” CARTA can also be applied at runtime with approaches such as deception technologies. Advances in technologies such as virtualization and software-defined networking has made it easier to deploy, manage and monitor “adaptive honeypots” — the basic component of network-based deception.

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Brett.Ashley.Crawford's curator insight, October 10, 10:37 AM
Staying on top of emerging #digitak is necessary but difficulty for many @techinthearts but those who do will be the leading players in 2050.
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The rising tension between IoT and ERP systems

The rising tension between IoT and ERP systems | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is the new frontier. However, generations of ERP systems were not designed to handle global networks of sensors and devices.
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The IFS survey includes the following observations about the challenge:

IoT and digital transformation go hand in hand: If you want to digitally transform, you need to seriously engage in IoT, the survey's authors state. Otherwise, disruptive innovators may come into the market and do it for you. "Larger organizations were more likely to report that their enterprise software was an impediment to digital transformation, for instance,even though they are more likely than any other demographic to report sensoring more than 90 percent of their equipment.," says the report. "This would suggest large companies may have sensors on much of their equipment but lack the wherewithal to funnel the data from these connected devices into their enterprise systems.The implication is clear--larger companies must get serious about ensuring their enterprise software streamlines bilateral integration with connected devices or risk losing the digital transformation race to smaller, more nimble, companies."

Enterprise software must facilitate IoT: "ERP systems have long focused on tying systems together, from plant floor to financial systems," the survey's authors state. Now, digital transformation depends "largely on the ability of each company to extend IoT data from the plant floor or the field to the C-suite." The challenge, then, is for enterprise software to facilitate "direct communication between enterprise systems like ERP, enterprise asset management and field service management software and sensored devices on the plant floor--or distributed assets in the field."

Enterprise software must facilitate IoT: "Direct communication between enterprise systems like ERP, EAM and field service management software and sensored devices on the plant floor--or distributed assets in the field--will be essential for organizations to achieve the more advanced use cases for IoT," the IFS report states. While 58% of the most advanced companies are able to deliver IoT data through their process automation systems, only 34% are able to leverage data from their manufacturing execution systems, and 19% are able to correlate data with ERP systems. Remember, these are the most digitally advanced companies in the sample.

 

Perhaps it's a matter of mixing apples and oranges -- at least that's the perception. "IoT is a very specific thing. Digital transformation is a concept," says Veague. "Trying to correlate these things is difficult. In order to realize business growth, companies must not only think more creatively about IoT, but be able to use IoT data in the context of their business, which likely means tighter integration with applications like ERP."

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Forrester: 3 ways the IoT can drive business value

Forrester: 3 ways the IoT can drive business value | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Forrester report details how businesses can actually take advantage of the Internet of Things.
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As vendors spend billions to try and grab IoT market share, it’s not always clear exactly how their business customers are supposed to actually benefit from IoT. (The challenges can be equally hard to understand). According to a thoughtful new report from Forrester, the answer lies in three fundamental business scenarios:

  1. Design: Transform new or existing products or environments
  2. Operate: Enhance physical processes with better information and digital automation
  3. Consume: Improve services, operations or products with third-party IoT customer and context data
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The Engineer’s Guide To High-Quality PCB Design

The Engineer’s Guide To High-Quality PCB Design | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Eventually, almost every EE must design a PCB, which isn’t something that’s taught in school. Yet engineers, technicians, and even novice PCB designers can create high-quality PCBs for any and every purpose with confidence that the outcome will meet or exceed the objective.

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Eventually, almost every EE must design a PCB, which isn’t something that’s taught in school. Yet engineers, technicians, and even novice PCB designers can create high-quality PCBs for any and every purpose with confidence that the outcome will meet or exceed the objective.

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R&D Special Focus: Internet of Things (IoT)

R&D Special Focus: Internet of Things (IoT) | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
IoT is the inter-networking of “smart” devices, such as those used in homes, offices, and vehicles.
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Techology Trends care of the Energy and Power Industrial Sector

Techology Trends care of the Energy and Power Industrial Sector | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Check out the latest technology trends in the industry. 
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E&P (online) Magzine Managing Editor and her take on what those trends are for the Energy Sector

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DIY Artificial Intelligence Robot

Creoqode is raising funds for NOVA | DIY Artificial Intelligence Robot on Kickstarter!

Build your own artificial intelligence robot and practice your coding and engineering skills in the most exciting way.

Via Jinbuhm Kim
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Creoqode Nova is an Arduino-based artificial intelligence robot.

Nova comes as an all-inclusive do-it-yourself kit allowing users to build their own artificial intelligence robot and to practice their coding and engineering skills by controlling it in various ways.

Nova is a great kit to learn about coding, electronics and many other engineering concepts including computer vision, image processing, kinematics and control theory. 

Nova can recognise and track faces, identify colours, measure distances and move accordingly in 5 different axis’, or it can simply be controlled with the joysticks in the kit.

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Cadillac’s Super Cruise maps are key to our robotaxi future

Cadillac’s Super Cruise maps are key to our robotaxi future | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Cadillac is doing something new with LiDAR. Instead of sticking a puck on its cars, it's using the sensors to map the highways of the United States and Canad
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Cadillac is doing something new with LiDAR. Instead of sticking a puck on its cars, it's using the sensors to map the highways of the United States and Canada and geofence its semi-autonomous Super Cruise feature, instead of letting drivers use it anywhere they want. It seems like a bold move, but in reality, it's how self-driving cars will initially enter the market.

The realization of a fully autonomous-car future rests on regulations, sensors, high-powered computers and maps. While safety is the basis for most vehicle laws, it's becoming increasingly important for there to be blanket federal regulations concerning these vehicles (instead of the current patchwork of laws that vary from state to state).  Sensors are increasing in accuracy while dropping in price and the silicon that crunches all that data is getting smaller and more powerful. In the middle of all that are the maps that are essential for actual navigation, both around town and within lanes. So while Cadillac is the first automaker to use high definition LiDAR maps, it certainly won't be the last.  Nearly every car with some sort of semi-autonomous feature is using a map to help keep it on the road. Tesla has its community sourced information while Mercedes-Benz is using Here maps to help determine the appropriate speed to take an upcoming corner.   Yet, it'll be highly detailed maps like the one used by Cadillac that'll make robotaxis a reality. The LiDAR map used by Super Cruise and stored in the trunk of the CT6 is accurate within 10 centimeters. It sees 2,500 meters ahead of the car based on its trajectory and shares information with the computer that determines if the semi-autonomous feature should continue or if the driver should take over.  When Uber and Lyft finally drop their truly self-driving taxis onto the streets or cities, or unveil their fleets of autonomous buses they'll need to be able to access a locally stored map like the CT6 does to navigate the complex roads of a metropolitan area.

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Challenges and the way forward in the journey of digitization

Challenges and the way forward in the journey of digitization | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Being Digital is all about taking the customer to the blissed state of esteem experience.
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Being Digital is all about taking the customer to the blissed state of esteem experience.   When did we become DIGITAL? Is it from the time when needles were replaced with digits on the watches? Probably from then till today the digital journey had been evolving - from ‘being digital’ to a matured state of selling ‘digital services’.  Traditional communication business today is under tremendous pressure – Demand for bandwidth is always on the rise which has resulted in increased investment in network, coupled with price war from peers. Revenue has eroded to over-the-top (OTT) players whose services are non-regulatory, free and global in nature. Hence it is inevitable for Communications Service Providers (CSPs) to ‘be digital’ and start selling ‘digital services’. They sit on pile of valuable information about their customers which can be leveraged to innovate and sell digital services and create new avenues of monetization
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How to become an innovation machine! | Sergei Ikovenko | TEDxDornbirn 

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Sergei speaks about systematic idea generation. How creativity, ideation and inspiration can be triggered and evolved by applying structured, well-defined principles and how everybody can use this knowledge. Sergei is one of the leading consultants and project facilitators in innovation technology of design. He has conducted more than 900 courses on innovation topics for Fortune 500 companies worldwide. Sergei was the primary instructor to deliver corporate innovation programs at Procter & Gamble, Mitsubishi Research Institute, Samsung, Intel, Siemens, Hyundai Motor Group, etc. Sergei has effectively utilized his expertise to receive 104 patents in various engineering fields. He has taught seminars at MIT, Harvard University, Carnegie-Melon University, California Institute of Technology, Stanford University, Vanderbilt University, and other leading educational institutions worldwide.

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We need an effective packet core in IoT 

We need an effective packet core in IoT  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things (IoT) is being hailed as the next big thing in the tech world. The way in which we live our day-to-day lives will change forever whe
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Equipment manufacturers continue to push the IoT line, but those who need to lay the infrastructure to ensure the phenomenon becomes a reality remain reserved. This hesitancy is highlighted in an industry report which found that a massive 86% of service providers admit they are not ready for IoT, and only a few are showing actual progress.  Despite this slow progress, IoT promises to heavily shape the telecoms industry. We’ve heard about the benefits IoT can bring not just for consumers looking to build their connected homes and drive connected cars, but a range of different industries including healthcare, manufacturing, transportation, warehousing and retail. The demand to be consistently connected, and to digitally communicate with anything from another phone to a kettle, for example, highlights that this phenomenon is not going away any time soon – despite the slow uptake.  Thus, the reliability of connections will become vital for the growth and success of the IoT revolution. Many are predicting that 5G (5th generation mobile communications) will go some way to supporting the vast number of connections, but there are still likely to be problems with performance and reliability if the right solutions and network infrastructure aren’t implemented.

The huge scale of IoT adoption is a major challenge for network operators. Experts believe that network operators have the power to unlock the true capabilities of IoT, but speed is of the essence and the industry is frantically trying to keep up with end user demands and expectations. In light of this, a key problem that needs to be addressed is the protocols needed to run IoT applications.

Core network capacity?  If IoT is to truly take off and its full capabilities be realised, operators must be prepared to maintain enough capacity in the core network, and more importantly, manage the connections to it without creating bottlenecks. Typically, GPRS Tunnelling Protocol (GTP) solutions have been able to handle up to 25-30,000 Packet Data Protocol (PDP) contexts per application, but operators now need to be looking towards coping with millions. By foreseeing this huge surge operators can prepare appropriately rather than waiting for it turn up unexpectedly at their door.

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How GE’s security head protects the industrial IoT

How GE’s security head protects the industrial IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
When it comes to securing enterprises and manufacturing plants, the CISOs at big organizations have to get their hands dirty on the operational technology side. They can’t leave sensors in th…
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When it comes to securing enterprises and manufacturing plants, the CISOs at big organizations have to get their hands dirty on the operational technology side. They can’t leave sensors in the office hallways, for example, or HVAC systems to the facilities or plant operators anymore.

That’s the message that Nasrin Rezai, the global chief information and product security officer at GE, shared with an audience of security professionals this week at the Structure Security conference held in San Francisco. I interviewed Rezai, who has the unenviable job of overseeing not just GE’s internal security but also the production and protection GE provides to clients.

Rezai focused mostly on the gaps that currently exist between the IT side of the house and operations. Both sides have lessons to learn when it comes to working together and any smart executive needs to take control of both if they really want to get a handle on their security because attacks came come from anywhere.

She also brought up the challenge of securing more connected assets and said that if companies want to do this, they have to start building automation into their efforts. Her staff is now focused less on threat detection, which can be mostly automated, and more focused on analyzing when events might turn into new threats. Rezai’s message was echoed by Melissa Arnoldi, a senior executive vice president at AT&T, who also pushed for more automation in security.

Both women emphasized that security talent is tough to find so training internal staff to grow into more analysis roles is essential. This is easy for companies to say, but tough to do. AT&T does this by training workers using courses it developed with Georgia Tech and also with Udacity.

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Columbia engineers invent breakthrough millimeter-wave circulator IC

Columbia engineers invent breakthrough millimeter-wave circulator IC | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Researchers are first to demonstrate a circulator on a silicon chip at mm-wave frequencies that enables nonreciprocal transmission of waves: device could enable two-way radios and transform 5g networks, self-driving cars, and virtual reality.
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Most devices are reciprocal: signals travel in the same manner in forward and reverse directions. Nonreciprocal devices, such as circulators, on the other hand, allow forward and reverse signals to traverse different paths and therefore be separated. Traditionally, nonreciprocal devices have been built from special magnetic materials that make them bulky, expensive, and not suitable for consumer wireless electronics.   The team has developed a new way to enable nonreciprocal transmission of waves: using carefully synchronized high-speed transistor switches that route forward and reverse waves differently. In effect, it is similar to two trains approaching each other at super-high speeds that are detoured at the last moment so that they do not collide.  The key advance of this new approach is that it enables circulators to be built in conventional semiconductor chips and operate at millimeter-wave frequencies, enabling full-duplex or two-way wireless. Virtually all electronic devices currently operate in half-duplex mode at lower radio-frequencies (below 6GHz), and consequently, we are rapidly running out of bandwidth. Full-duplex communications, in which a transmitter and a receiver of a transceiver operate simultaneously on the same frequency channel, enables doubling of data capacity within existing bandwidth. Going to the higher mm-wave frequencies, 30GHz and above, opens up new bandwidth that is not currently in use.  “This gives us a lot more real estate,” notes Krishnaswamy, whose Columbia High-Speed and Mm-wave IC (CoSMIC) Lab has been working on silicon radio chips for full duplex communications for several years. His method enables loss-free, compact, and extremely broadband non-reciprocal behavior, theoretically from DC to daylight, that can be used to build a wide range of non-reciprocal components such as isolators, gyrators, and circulators.

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Computer virus infects US military drone fleet: report

Computer virus infects US military drone fleet: report | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story inadvertently went off reporting from a Wired.com article published in 2011. The story, as published by The Hill, incorrectly stated that the military had detected the virus two weeks
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A computer virus has reportedly infected the US military drone fleet, Wired.com reported, citing three sources familiar with the matter.  The military’s Host Based Security System detected the virus two weeks ago, according to the news outlet, which added that it so far has not appeared to affect overseas missions by either interfering with pilots' navigation or leaking classified information.   Network security specialists, however, tell Wired that the virus keeps returning to computers at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada despite repeated attempts to remove it.

“We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back,” a source familiar with the network infection said. “We think it’s benign. But we just don’t know.”  Specialists are reportedly still trying to determine if the virus is a so-called “keylogger” that could've been entered into the code either intentionally or by accident, or if it is run-of-the-mill malware that made its way into the system.   Those specialists, who are still investigating the reach of the virus, told Wired they believe it has infected both classified and unclassified systems at Creech Air Force Base.

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IoT Risks Loom Over Critical Infrastructure

IoT Risks Loom Over Critical Infrastructure | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With the IoT promising, or perhaps threatening, to connect many more millions of devices, experts are urging action.
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All three experts suggest educating students at an early age to develop a more cyber-savvy work force. “One of the things we need to do is to start teaching cyber at the kindergarten level,” Adm. Macke asserts. “Maybe we could do it as they come out of the nursery.”   The admiral adds that today’s children become expert computer operators at an early age, but they do not necessarily understand the dangers in the cyber world. “They’re all over the computer. Not all, but certainly some of our problems are created by the kids who are using Mama’s and Papa’s computers and … picking up malware right and left, but they don’t understand the threats of cyber. We need to start that education early on.”

Maughan indicates that schools need to adjust. The recent executive order calls for cybersecurity-related curricula, training and apprenticeship programs from primary through higher education. “We’ve got students who are using computers and technology at a very early age. The students are very different, but it’s the same education system,” he elaborates. “It’s not just an issue for the people who are in the work force today. It’s the entire pipeline and how to prepare the next generations—how to get them trained and educated.”   The United States is not the only nation struggling with the work force issue. “Not only is that a national issue, that’s a global issue. Every country that I’ve been to in the last three years has the same problem,” Maughan reports.

All three experts also tout the power of automation, or removing the human from the cybersecurity loop as much as possible. “There’s going to be more and more automation. We just have to figure out how to use it to help us defend our systems. That might be using artificial intelligence or machine learning,” Maughan offers. He adds that automation can “remove the human from some of the processing” because “computers work much faster than humans.”  He acknowledges a dark side to automation tools. “The bad guys could use artificial intelligence and machine learning to figure out what our defenses are … and to crack into systems. We want to use it for good purposes; they want to use it for bad,” Maughan says.

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Keep calm and automate to unlock the opportunity in the vertical Internet of Things

Keep calm and automate to unlock the opportunity in the vertical Internet of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Since the term Internet of Things, or IoT, was coined in 1999, the industry has had its share of hype, consternation, successes, and now even twitter parody..
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Large companies such as GE, IBM, and Verizon, and startups like Relayr, Greenwave, and Sight Machine have begun to partner accelerate overall adoption.  Strategic partnerships, large marketing campaigns, and early successes have led to some lofty growth projections:

  • McKinsey & Co. estimates a potential economic impact of IoT systems of as much as $11.1 trillion per year in 2025.  Approximately 70% of the value is derived from B2B applications.

  • GE believes the IoT will add $10 to $15 trillion to worldwide GDP growth by 2030—the equivalent of China’s entire current economy.

  • Intel forecasts 200 billion connected devices by 2020, nearly 25 connected devices for every person on earth.

  • IBM believes that making sense of data embedded in intelligent devices is creating a significant market opportunity that is expected to reach $1.7 trillion by 2020.

Despite these compelling statistics, there are problems with current approaches.  For example, IBM believes almost 90 percent of the data captured via the IoT is never acted upon.

 

McKinsey also found that currently only 1% of sensor data from an oil rig with 30,000+ sensors is examined.

Why is that?  Consumer IoT will continue to move forward as a vertical opportunity (subject to a separate post) but the Enterprise will need better tools, newer methods to extract industry insights, and the ability to benefit from the information that the IoT enables.

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What’s The Difference Between Brush DC And Brushless DC Motors?

What’s The Difference Between Brush DC And Brushless DC Motors? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Despite being viable for a lot of the same applications, the difference between brush dc motors and brushless dc motors are not subtle.
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The motor and motor control markets are thriving in a number of areas, particularly medical and robotic applications. Also, there is a rich demand for small, efficient, high- and low-torque, and high- and low-power motors in the automotive sector.  These applications can choose from brush dc motors, brushless dc (BLDC) motors, or a combination of both. Most motors operate in accordance with Faraday’s law of induction(see here). Still, there are key differences between these motors and in the employment opportunities that await them.

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60% of manufacturers are testing IIoT programs but only 5% have a clear business case 

60% of manufacturers are testing IIoT programs but only 5% have a clear business case  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Manufacturers are convinced the Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) will help them improve operations and profitability by 10% or more, but mos
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The survey revealed that about 60% are exploring or investing in Industrial IoT pilot projects, but only 5% are investing against a clear business case for how to best implement the technology. The vast majority of Industrial IoT investment today is in the early stages of plan development and small-scale trials, often as part of a larger operational efficiency programme.  The survey found the biggest challenges for operational efficiency programmes are company culture (47%); lack of clear business strategy (41%); and knowing which technology will deliver measurable improvement (34%).   “Early Industrial IoT successes demonstrate that manufacturers can achieve operational improvements that significantly impact the bottom line, but this survey shows that adapting to advancing technology is a significant challenge,” said Mike Train, executive president of Emerson Automation Solutions. “The small percentage of companies that have already developed clear business plans for Industrial IoT are positioning themselves to realize tremendous competitive advantages. We encourage everyone else to consider two critical first steps: start small and invest in applications that enable a clear business case

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