Internet of Things - Technology focus
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LG's Rolly Wireless Keyboard Rolls Up Into a Pocketable Stick

LG's Rolly Wireless Keyboard Rolls Up Into a Pocketable Stick | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
LG's Rolly might be the most portable Bluetooth keyboard yet.
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If you find yourself having to type out long messages on your phone regularly, you might want to pick up a portable Bluetooth keyboard — and LG's Rolly might be one of the most portable yet. The key rows fold up around a squarish center, making for a sort of stick or baton when you want to put it away. But unfolded, it has more depth and space than many silicone keyboard cases and the like.

Sure, the Textblade is smaller, but its keys are tiny. And Microsoft's new one is flatter, but also much wider. LG's Rolly also has a little stand with which you can prop up your tablet. It's powered by one AAA battery.  You'll probably wish you'd brought your laptop anyway, but no one knows when the need to tap out an idea or brush up one's resume will strike. Better to be prepared.

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What You Need To Know About The Internet Of Things

What You Need To Know About The Internet Of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Information technology  has dramatically changed the way we work and play in a mere two or three decades. That said, the IT revolution is really just beginning, and the next phase of connectivity is a
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Innovative business models:  The Internet of Things will also lead to innovation, especially in terms of new business models that may shift competitive dynamics within industries. For example, using IoT data and connectivity has revolutionized the sales of industrial machinery and other goods into a service model. Among the pioneers of this new service model trend were jet-engine manufacturers that shifted their business model to selling thrust and related services rather than actual engines. Service-based models are are now found in a variety of industries. Of note, transportation as a service, Uber. Lyft and others, powered by apps and geolocation devices, is threatening vehicle sales and traditional distribution models. By the same token, manufacturers of laser printers and copiers with IoT capabilities are also becoming service businesses.   These new service-based business models depend on the Internet of Things. The IoT provides the ability to track how physical assets are actually used, and makes it possible for businesses to accurately price and charge for use. Furthermore, the data from all these connected assets permit a provider/manufacturer to operate equipment more efficiently than its customers, since customers only have a limited "in-house" view of their own equipment. In addition, analysis of IoT data allows for condition-based predictive maintenance, which can dramatically reduce unplanned downtime.
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Touchjet Wave will turn your TV into a touchscreen

Touchjet Wave will turn your TV into a touchscreen | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
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From smartphones to tablets to laptops, many of us own at least one device with a touchscreen. So why not touchscreen TVs? Touchjet wants to let you turn any TV into a touchscreen with the WAVE, a peripheral that plugs into any TV’s HDMI port. And by blowing through their $100,000 Indiegogo fundraising goal in less than 24 hours, the WAVE may become a reality. In fact, it has raised $416,649 as of the time this article was published.  The WAVE clamps on top of your TV and reads finger motions and gestures using infrared cameras. The WAVE can run Android apps installed on its own onboard Android operating system, or run apps via any smartphone or tablet using the downloadable WAVE app.  The most obvious application for a WAVE-powered touchscreen TV is to liven up the most dreaded business experience: the presentation. Office presentations are often still PowerPoint-style slideshows that have to be clicked through. With the WAVE, users can plug the peripheral on top of any TV with an HDMI port and move through presentations and documents via a fluid touch interface—and for $120 (the discounted Indiegogo price), it’s far cheaper than buying a new state-of-the-art touchscreen television. Best of all, the WAVE will ship with software that will let others sitting in the audience or at home directly manipulate or draw on/annotate the screen too using their phones or tablets, a screen-sharing interactivity akin to Google Docs.   "Connecting everyone in the audience via their own smartphones and tablets lets them participate in the conversation, so people aren’t distracted by their phones—they’re actively participating in a collaborative environment," says Thomas.  Touchjet started experimenting with enterprise touchscreens with their previous release, the Pond, a touchscreen projector that was successfully crowdfunded in September 2014 and began shipping this March, retailing for $599. The Pond’s touchscreen recognizes an infrared laser fired from a paired stylus. Touchjet wanted the WAVE to be far more natural, so they spent six months hammering out the WAVE’s design and code to recognize finger gestures without the need of a stylus or wearable ring.

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Self-driving trucks to be used for highway construction in Florida

Self-driving trucks to be used for highway construction in Florida | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
"Unlike Daimler's big rig that still needs someone behind the wheel, these ones are completely driverless."
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Autonomous trucks will soon be used at highway construction sites in Florida, and unlike Daimler's big rig that still needs someone behind the wheel, these ones are completely driverless. The truck was developed by Pennsylvania company Royal Truck & Equipment under a Department of Transportation pilot program. According to the company, there are three ways to control it: via GPS Waypoint navigation, through a remote control and via leader/follower programming. Since it's pretty common for motorists to slam into trucks used for highway construction, the rigs will be equipped with a special crash barrier called attenuators, which you can see in the image above.   These barriers are actually the reason why Royal pushed for a completely driverless system: yes, they can save both motorists and workers, but they'll put the driver's life in danger in case of an accident. The company showed off its technology on Monday in its home state and is expected to deploy the trucks in Florida by the end of 2015.

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IoT, Cost-per-Transistor Extend Lifetimes of Established Technology Nodes

IoT, Cost-per-Transistor Extend Lifetimes of Established Technology Nodes | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
IoT, Cost-per-Transistor Extend Lifetimes of Established Technology Nodes
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Established nodes are experiencing a much higher demand than one might normally expect at this point in their lifecycle. We believe this is driven by a couple of market dynamics, as discussed below. Their extended lives have brought some interesting physical verification, design-for-manufacturing (DFM), and manufacturing challenges to those seeking to leverage the benefits of these established nodes.

Why are Established Nodes Experiencing a Long Life?  The appetite for faster, smarter, lower-power, more interconnected, data-rich computing among the advanced economies worldwide (e.g. Europe, Japan, China, U.S., etc.) becomes more voracious by the day. Basic computing power continues to be driven by more powerful application processors, CPUs, GPUs, microcontrollers, memory, etc. marching down the Moore’s Law path. The iPhone, GoPro, and Nest have application processors and memory implemented at advanced nodes, such as 20 nm or 28 nm.   However, much of the Internet of Things (IoT) functionality we crave, such as smart power management for longer battery life, and Wi-Fi and Bluetooth for more connectivity, are more cost-effective when implemented at established nodes between 40 nm and 180 nm. Consequently, the high consumer demand for these capabilities is driving demand for ICs manufactured using these processes. In a nutshell, the nodes that best support RF and mixed-signal IC designs with low power, low cost, and high reliability are experiencing much higher demand than in the past.

The other dynamic benefiting the long life of established nodes—40/45 nm and 32/28 nm in particular—is the wafer cost trends at 20 nm and below. As I have previously written, with the semiconductor capital equipment industry stuck at the 193-nm wavelength, the only viable strategy to maintain a reasonable K1 and continue pursuing Moore’s Law is the use of multi-patterning.  Multi-patterning at 20 nm and below has enabled further scaling, but the inherent process complexity has driven up wafer cost, changing how fabless companies look at the jump to the next node. Just a few years ago, the jump would have been nearly automatic. However, with the cost structure of 20 nm and below, companies must seriously consider whether sales of the next design will really justify investing in the next node.

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Butterfleye Is A Home Security Camera That Can Learn What Not To Record

Butterfleye Is A Home Security Camera That Can Learn What Not To Record | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Butterfleye is a hardware startup aiming to build a connected home security camera that avoids coming across as creepily prying.
Richard Platt's insight:

In our over-surveilled digital times, putting an Internet-connected eye in your home could mean opening a peephole to unknown third parties. Or create a temptation for domestic spying. Which is not the definition of relationship trust, folks. Ergo security and privacy are key considerations for any startups working in such a sensitive area.

Butterfleye is tackling the privacy challenges inherent in offering to sell people a remotely controlled wireless lens by putting a processing layer on the device which it says can run analytics to intelligently detect who or what is in frame before recording and uploading any footage.   -  So, for instance, it could decide not to record the person who’s just walked into the room if that person actually lives in the house, for instance. Or the family pet is just being its usual, boisterous self rolling around on the living room carpet. It’s one way the team is aiming to set its connected hardware apart from existing rivals in the space — such as (the now Google-owned) Dropcam/Nest Cam.  “There is image algorithm analytics. There is audio analytics. The microphone can recognize certain sounds. For example dogs barking, kids crying. And we’re working on a glass breaking algorithm,” says Butterfleye founder and CEO Ben Nader, explaining the startup’s patent-pending ‘Activity Based Recording’ tech. “Then on the video side we have a technology like face detect, we have a technology like pets and human detect. And learning algorithms to learn ‘oh this home has a pet. And it’s normal for a pet to move around the house and not have any alerts’.”  “There have been some [other companies] who have been trying to play with this by doing some analytics in the cloud but the key value is doing the analytics at the camera level, before you’ve uploaded hours and hours of video,” he adds.  -  “If you need to upload all the video into the cloud to be able to tell ‘oh the living room is empty — don’t record’ you’ve already recorded. And how do you know when to wake up when something does happen?”   This on-device processing layer will allow users to customize the system to preserve the privacy of particular family members, according to Nader. It also means the device will only record selectively — capturing notable events, not everything, or even every motion — thereby minimizing the quantity of footage generated.

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Oshkosh Wins $6.75 Billion Military Contract to Replace Humvee

Oshkosh Wins $6.75 Billion Military Contract to Replace Humvee | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Oshkosh Corp. on Tuesday won a $6.75 billion contract to build almost 17,000 new light trucks to replace aging Humvees for the U.S. Army and Marine Corps, cementing the future of its defense business.
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The Wisconsin-based company was chosen over competitors Lockheed Martin Corp. and AM General LLC to build as many as 55,000 Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, or JLTVs, over the next 25 years to replace part of the Humvee fleet and some larger military trucks.

The JLTV is one of the Army’s highest priorities and follows a series of budget cuts and shifting requirements that prompted the Pentagon to cancel helicopter, artillery and communications programs, after investing billions of dollars.  Oshkosh has a long history of producing military vehicles and offered a brand-new design to meet the Army’s requirements for a four-wheeled truck to carry two or four personnel that is resistant to mines and roadside bombs, but also is light enough to be carried by air.  The new trucks will replace many of the 120,000 Humvee trucks built by AM General that have been worn out by use in Iraq and Afghanistan, and promise greater protection against mines and roadside bombs, as well as more range and durability to move troops and gear. They are also lighter than the Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles introduced in Iraq. against mines and roadside bombs,

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​Startup aims to make home devices smart enough to anticipate what you need

​Startup aims to make home devices smart enough to anticipate what you need | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Silk Labs wants to weave its software and services into all the new networked devices coming to homes of the future. Behind it: a trio fresh from the ambitious Firefox OS smartphone project.
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Silk Labs wants to weave its software and services into all the new networked devices coming to homes of the future. Behind it: a trio fresh from the ambitious Firefox OS smartphone project.   The team behind an ambitious attempt to rewrite the rules of smartphone software has banded together again at a new startup called Silk Labs that hopes to profit from the spread of computing smarts far beyond today's mobile devices.  Co-founders Andreas Gal, Chris Jones and Michael Vines previously worked on Mozilla's Firefox OS, software designed to power smartphones that Mozilla and a slew of industry partners hoped would loosen the grip Google and Apple hold on that important market. Firefox OS hasn't gotten too far, but at Silk Labs, the engineers believe they can sidestep those industry giants with a new collection of software and services for a coming era with billions of other interconnected devices.   "We are trying to provide that piece that ties Internet of Things devices together," said Gal, Mozilla's former chief technology officer, in an interview here about Silk Labs.  Silk Labs is just one of many companies chasing what could be the next big computing revolution in a sequence that led from mainframes to personal computers to smartphones. It's a market that research firm International Data Corp. believes will grow from $655.8 billion last year to $1.7 trillion in 2020. To stand apart, Silk Labs is developing technology designed not just to make Internet of Things devices easy to control, but to make them smart enough to anticipate what people need so they won't have to manually control anything at all.

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MIT 3D Printer Prints Up to 10 Materials at Once

MIT 3D Printer Prints Up to 10 Materials at Once | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The MultiFab 3D printer prints up to 10 different materials at once, saving users time, energy, and money.
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Whether you're building a footbridge or a sports car, 3D printing can be a cheap and easy way to obtain the materials you need. But it has its limits.  Most 3D printers use one material at a time, though some pricey machines have dabbled with up to three materials. But a team of researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) developed the MultiFab 3D printer, which prints up to 10 different materials at once.  -  Using 3D-scanning techniques, the MultiFab can self-calibrate and self-correct. It also allows users to embed complex components (i.e. circuits and sensors), directly onto the body of an object; the researchers, for instance, printed lenses on top of LEDs.   Unlike most current 3D printers, the MultiFab can produce and finish a product—moving parts and all—in one fell swoop: Place an iPhone into the printer, and it will spit out a perfectly sized case, the team said.  While the CSAIL team has no expectations of their MultiFab 3D printer being installed in customers' homes, they do hope it can be put to use by researchers, manufacturers, and other businesses.    "Picture someone who sells electric wine openers, but doesn't have $7,000 to buy a printer like this," Ramos said. "In the future they could walk into a FedEx with a design and print out batches of their finished product at a reasonable price. For me, a practical use like that would be the ultimate dream."

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Recharge During The Commute: England's New Motorways Power Electric Cars In Motion

Recharge During The Commute: England's New Motorways Power Electric Cars In Motion | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
England may just be building the highways of the future. This month, the Brits announced a pilot for electric motorways.  Yes, that’s correct.  You can charge your electric vehicle while driving, minimizing stop times at charging stations and making it easier to do a road trip in a Tesla. The UK [...]

Via 15marches
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England may just be building the highways of the future.  This month, the Brits announced a pilot for electric motorways. Yes, that’s correct. You can charge your electric vehicle while driving, minimizing stop times at charging stations and making it easier to do a road trip in a Tesla.  The UK is not the first country to try this concept. The Netherlands has been researching “smart highways,” which go beyond electric-powered streets to a host of new technologies. South Korea already has a 15-mile stretch of road that’s powered with electric cables. The UK hopes to build a more expansive network but will begin with an 18-month pilot.  The UK has been pumping money into new technologies for its aging infrastructure. Highways England, the government agency responsible for the country’s motorways, is already committed to placing plug-in charging stations every 20 miles along its major A1 roads. This is part of the government’s Road Investment Strategy, in which the government will spend $17 billion to modernize its transit systems.

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Ohneka Farms: Hydroponic Farming Meets The IoT

Ohneka Farms: Hydroponic Farming Meets The IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Ohneka Farms is building ROOT, a countertop smart planter that allows you to grow a variety of plants seamlessly with the swipe of a finger. Learn more about the founder's vision for the future of growing in this Roadmap Video on the convergence of hydroponic farming and the Internet of Things.
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Pitch: Ohneka Farms is developing ROOT, a countertop smart planter that allows you to grow a variety of plants seamlessly by automating watering and lighting cycles with the swipe of a finger.

Mission: To connect smart gardening systems throughout the home to a flourishing network of growers around the world, no matter their experience level.

Macro Thesis: The entire growing industry will be transformed with the introduction of smarter software that personalizes growing. Everyone will be able to grow plants with the swipe of a finger. Every growing experience will harness collaborative growing networks in order to address gardening pain points.  With signs of drought and soil depletion all over the world, people are going to depend on smarter technology to conserve resources in order to cultivate more locally-sourced vegetation. In the future, people will be able to easily grow and monitor gardens from the comfort of their own homes.

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The search for the 4th Protocol – the missing link of the IoT

The search for the 4th Protocol – the missing link of the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The thorny issue of wireless protocols and the Internet of Things
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There are now twice the number of connected devices on the planet than humans. From smart meters and thermostats to pumps, smart motors, sensors, and robots, there is no lingua franca in the IoT. Amid competing technologies including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cellular and radio frequency, and many iterations of each, the communications landscape is confusing. The Internet of Things – so often used only as slang for enabling devices to become 'smart' – has a missing link.  "The low-power, low-cost, mesh networking capabilities of 802.15.4 networks make them the primary wireless technology choice across a number of different vertical markets including home, building and industrial automation, smart metering, and home entertainment," says Andrew Zignani, Research Analyst at ABI Research. ZigBee is expected to see its strongest growth in the home automation market, where the share of total ZigBee shipments will rise from around 9% today to 28% in 2019. However, the industrial IoT has other plans.  In the IoT as a whole, all of these typical wireless protocols are being used. "Standards in the IoT space are somewhat in their infancy, but I would expect a bias to Wi-Fi due to its ubiquity in the home, and Bluetooth LE for devices paired with mobile phones taken from the home," says Phil Williams, Principal Architect, Rackspace, who also thinks that Power Line connectivity provides a simple plug-and-play approach when teamed up with an internet-connected gateway device.   Why is the industrial IoT different?   Smart buildings, grids, meters and agriculture are now being constructed across the planet, and it's this Industrial IoT that the likes of Siemens, GE and Rockwell, as well as IT companies like Cisco, Intel, Oracle and Qualcomm, are most interested in. However, Wi-Fi and ZigBee are unlikely to triumph.

"While the IoT has evolved with the use of Wi-Fi and ZigBee, these are still limited by battery life, insufficient cell coverage and unmanaged local area networks (LANs)," says Olivier Hersent, the CEO, CTO and Founder of Actility, a provider of network solutions and managed information systems for the Internet of Things (IoT) market. "The IoT on an industrial scale will be about '0G' rather than 4G or even 5G."

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Tapping Into The Emotional Internet

Tapping Into The Emotional Internet | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Wearables currently decipher physiological biometrics -- heart rate, pulse, caloric intake. But in the coming years, we’ll see emotion-sensing wearable..

Via Olivier Janin
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Wearables currently decipher physiological biometrics: heart rate, pulse, caloric intake. But in the coming years, we’ll see emotion-sensing wearable technology that clues us into specific human emotions.  -When this data is shared across networks, we’ll enter the dawn of the “Emotional Internet.”  -  This is not a purely theoretical concept. Already, there are efforts to measure and quantify human emotion in a machine-readable way. Affectiva, an emotion-measurement technology firm, has collected more than a billion frames of spontaneous facial expressions, using the data to develop technology that can detect several types of emotions.   - One of the initiatives of Microsoft Research’s Visualization and Interaction for Business and Entertainment (VIBE) division, meanwhile, is to explore human-computer interaction. It has designed a prototype scarf that employs sensors to discern the wearer’s mood and, via Bluetooth, the moods of others.  Another company, Spire, manufactures a small stone-shaped sensor that can be clipped to a bra strap or belt and is able to pick up on your stress levels.  Much of this research and development is part of the emerging field of affective computing, which examines ways to create sensors and computers that can detect and respond to human emotions.

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Salesforce CEO Bullish Benioff slams Oracle and IBM

Salesforce CEO Bullish Benioff slams Oracle and IBM | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Salesforce CEO berates Oracle's 'failure' on cloud
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Benioff is acting like John Legere the T-Mobile CEO, funny to watch. He most recently blasted rivals IBM and Oracle, branding the latter a failure in the cloud market.  Bullish Benioff made the comments on a Q2 earnings call last night, when the company posted sales of $1.63bn (£1.04bn), an increase of nearly a quarter (24 per cent) compared with a year ago – beating analysts' expectations. The firm made a loss of $852,000, compared with a loss of $61m a year ago.  On the results call, addressing analysts, Benioff boasted about the company's success before lashing out at its rivals.   "Look, Microsoft, Oracle, SAP – they're selling millions of dollars of CRM, that's with an M," he said. "We are selling billions of dollars of CRM that's with a B. And that is the difference between us and the competition.  "No other enterprise cloud can match the breadth and depth of our trusted cloud platform and complete customer relationship management solutions, whether it's sales or service, marketing [or] community analytics apps within the Internet of Things. And no one can match the strength of the SalesForce ecosystem."  Back in June, Oracle's executive chairman Larry Ellison berated Salesforce on an earnings call and said his company will soon overtake its rival on cloud sales.   Benioff hit back at the claims on the Salesforce call when questioned about Ellison's comments.  "I think we've mostly seen Oracle actually fail in the cloud market," he said. "I mean, for a long time, Larry said the cloud was ridiculous and then he started taking it more seriously, but I just haven't seen any competitive cloud solutions from Oracle. And I think that's the shame.  "I do view Larry as one of the most capable leaders in our industry. He's amazing. Of course, he's one of my mentors. But in this area of the cloud, Oracle has not delivered."

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This startup raised $5 million to bring the blockchain to the IoT

This startup raised $5 million to bring the blockchain to the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Sometimes decentralization makes sense.
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Filament is a startup that is taking two of the most overhyped ideas in the tech community—the block chain and the Internet of things—and applying them to the most boring problems the world has ever seen. Gathering data from farms, mines, oil platforms and other remote or highly secure places.  The combination could prove to be a powerful one because monitoring remote assets like oil wells or mining equipment is expensive whether you are using people driving around to manually check gear or trying to use sensitive electronic equipment and a pricey a satellite internet connection.  Instead Filament has built a rugged sensor package that it calls a Tap, and technology network that is the real secret sauce of the operation that allows its sensors to conduct business even when they aren’t actually connected to the internet. The company has attracted an array of investors who have put $5 million into the company, a graduate of the Techstars program. Bullpen Capital led the round with Verizon Ventures, Crosslink Capital, Samsung Ventures, Digital Currency Group, Haystack, Working Lab Capital, Techstars and others participating.   To build its technology, Filament is using a series of protocols that include the blockchain transaction database behind Bitcoin; BitTorrent, the popular peer-to-peer file sharing software; Jose, a contract management protocol that is also used in the OAuth authentication service that lets people use their Facebook ID to log in and manage permissions to other sites around the web; TMesh, a long-range mesh networking technology and Telehash for private messaging.

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Lugg, An App For On-Demand, Short-Distance Moves, Raises $3.8 Million

Lugg, An App For On-Demand, Short-Distance Moves, Raises $3.8 Million | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
While Uber, Lyft, and similar ride-sharing services can help you get from one place to the next, they aren't practical for hauling your large purchases - like..
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While Uber, Lyft, and similar ride-sharing services can help you get from one place to the next, they aren’t practical for hauling your large purchases – like those from an IKEA shopping spree, or a sofa you found on Craigslist, for example. That’s where a service called Lugg comes in. If Lyft is like your friend with a car, then Lugg is like your friend with a truck.    The startup, a recent grad from Y Combinator’s Summer 2015 class, has now raised $3.8 million in seed funding from a number of investors, which will allow it to grow its team and expand to new cities.   Ronny Conway’s A Capital led the round, which also saw participation from SV Angel, CrunchFund (disclosure: a fund founded by TechCrunch’s original founder, Michael Arrington), and a number of angel investors, including Gmail creator and FriendFeed founder Paul Buchheit.  First launched in the San Francisco Bay Area in early 2015, the idea for Lugg came from Jordan Brown, who previously worked at a healthcare startup, but found himself facing the problem Lugg aims to solve first-hand. Many of us, both with and without cars, can also relate. We often have to make special, and sometimes expensive, delivery arrangements for our bigger purchases that don’t fit in standard-sized vehicles, or we have to hunt down someone who has a truck and convince them to help us.

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New law permits North Dakota cop drones to fire beanbag rounds from the sky

New law permits North Dakota cop drones to fire beanbag rounds from the sky | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
To pass new warrant requirement, lawmaker compromised to allow less-than-lethals.
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North Dakota is believed to be the first state in the union to allow such weapons aboard state and local police drones.  However alleged non-lethal weapons just don't perform in that manner according to the research; Such non-lethal weapons have been shown that they can, in fact, kill people. Research done by The Guardian, 39 Americans have died this year alone at the hands of police wielding a Taser. Meanwhile, the Associated Press reported Wednesday that more than 20 North American cities are pursuing large silicone-based projectiles as yet another alternative weapon.  -  The Peace Garden State has become something of a hub for drone research and development. It offers a bachelor’s degree in "Unmanned Aircraft Systems" at the University of North Dakota, while the state’s Air National Guard unit hosts a number of MQ-1 Predator drones. The state also hosts the country’s only Federal Aviation Administration-approved drone testing site that can fly both during the day and at night.   "It really takes a very subtle situational awareness to understand when it's ok to use less-than-lethal," Ryan Calo, a law professor and drone expert at the University of Washington, told Ars.  "The problem is that it will be used too often because the perception that the stakes are not very high, because sometimes less-than-lethal can be lethal.  So it strikes me that putting less-than-lethals on drones creates a double remove: the officer doesn't have situational awareness, and they don't know whether a conversation could de-escalate [the situation]. That's one thing, and second, the fact that it's less-than-lethals will mean that [police will] hesitate less and will use it more often."

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The 12 Disruptive Tech Trends You Need to Know

The 12 Disruptive Tech Trends You Need to Know | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Insight into which developments will have the greatest impact on the business world in the coming decades. 



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Richard Platt's insight:

1. Energy storage

2. Genomics

3. Advanced materials

4. Autonomous vehicles

5. Renewable energy

6. Advanced robotics

7. 3D printing

8. Mobile internet

9. Automation of knowledge work

10. Internet of Things (IoT)

11.  Cloud technology

12.  Advanced oil and gas exploration and recovery

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 27, 2015 1:18 PM

#Disruptive #Technology is changing our world rapidly. Check out all these amazing new trends.

Farid Mheir's curator insight, August 29, 2015 5:24 PM

No surprise, but always good to be reminded during budgeting and strategy season.

Jack Licata's curator insight, September 9, 2015 9:37 AM

The Future Is Now!!

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The Sensel Morph Is A Keyboard On a Higher Level

The Sensel Morph Is A Keyboard On a Higher Level | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Morph will completely change the way you interact with the digital world.
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Don’t let its looks fool you. The Sensel Morph may have the appearance of your run-of-the-mill trackpad, but the technology it possesses is above and beyond any device you’re used to navigating your computer with. Equipped with 20,000 sensors, the Morph can detect touches of the most minimal kind, and will even measure the amount of force behind each act of pressing, swiping, or tapping that occurs on its surface.  Perhaps the most impressive trait of The Morph keypad is the range of tools it can be commanded with. Unlike the capacitive touch displays built into smartphones, Sensel’s innovative keyboard doesn’t require a human touch to function. The device can be manned just as efficiently using not only a stylus, but also items like a pencil or paintbrush. Such technology will allow users for a much more natural and fluid experience when it comes to things like painting or drawing.  Furthering its diverse functionality, The Morph comes with three different types of overlays that connect to the device using magnets. A keyboard, an MPC-style MIDI controller, and a piano/drum pad round out the attachments that enable users to perform a larger variety of tasks than one can using a typical mouse and keypad. Using Bluetooth, The Morph can be used to control a computer, as well as a tablet or smartphone.

While The Morph’s day 1 features already leave your average keyboard in the dust, it’s capabilities don’t stop there. Encouraging users to improve upon the original device, Sensel is allowing users to make their own custom Morph interfaces via a drag-and-drop process. As the library of user-designed interfaces grows, each can be shared among the community of Morph owners.

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As Apple Pay Fraud Grows, Banks Scramble to Fix Credit Card Flaw

As Apple Pay Fraud Grows, Banks Scramble to Fix Credit Card Flaw | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Cyber thieves have already figured out a way to get around Apple Pay's security system, raising issues not only for Apple but for Samsung and others in mobile payment.

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
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The problem is simple. With stashes of millions of stolen credit cards details harvested in the recent breaches at Target (TGT - Get Report) , Home Depot (HD - Get Report) and the others, thieves have realized that an iPhone can, in effect, be transformed into a credit card substitute by loading it with a stolen number. Before, those criminals could only shop at online retailers. Now, with an iPhone, they can walk out of retail stores with merchandise they can sell.   Since its inception, Apple Pay’s purportedly stronger security has been touted by Apple CEO Tim Cook, who pointed to fingerprint biometrics, including TouchID, and turning the transaction data into something non-sensitive, a process known as tokenization.  But at least some experts think Apple Pay may not be as safe as advertised.  Cherian Abraham, who heads mobile commerce & payments at Experian Global Consulting, blogged in early January on DropLabs.net, that one credit card issuer -- which he couldn't name -- said Apple Pay fraud is running a rate of $6 per $100 in transactions, some 60 times higher than normal.   Gartner analyst Avivah Litan said in an email that "every bank issuer has been impacted by it, according to my bank sources." She believes all mobile payments solutions are likely to have problems similar to what appears to be plaguing Apple Pay. 

That's because the security issue revolves around card enrollment
No one claims that the volumes of fraud in Apple Pay are enormous. Indeed, the overall volume of transactions on Apple Pay are relatively small even if the device is currently accounting for two-thirds of all contactless payments in the U.S. "I doubt the volume of fraud is out of control since [Apple Pay] still constitutes a fraction of the transactions out there," Litan said. 

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ISA-95 Unplugged: How Will MOM and IIoT Merge?

ISA-95 Unplugged: How Will MOM and IIoT Merge? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Detailing integration between enterprise and control systems, the ISA-95 standard offers a good starting point for an Industrial Internet of Things...
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We can imagine everything that is currently in our control world as being an object—sometimes smart and sometimes connected. For manufacturing staff to start seeing the possibilities of IIoT, they can imagine all their current systems and devices as objects or things in the IIoT. They can then analyze how they could fit together and help each other in new and exciting ways. It is not necessary to start with everything neither smart nor connected, but it is useful to understand where connection and “smartness” would help to make the business run better.   Clearly, a little help in understanding how to split up your software systems to enable this type of thinking would be beneficial. This is where ISA-95 is your friend. ISA has gone to the enormous task of defining object models for just about anything that you can do at Level 3 (MOM) so you can conceptually break up your system using these pre-defined object classes (this is also extremely useful if you are considering implementing a new MOM layer, but that complex discussion is for another time).   You can also carry out the same exercise with systems at the control and enterprise levels and beyond. For example, you may have controllers in the field that are only accessible through a DCS or SCADA system. You can still imagine these as objects with behavior, inputs and outputs. A variable-speed motor might have outputs of actual speed, runtime and average speed, an input of set speed, and the behavior of being able to change the speed of the motor. Normally, these are used by the control system, but it is quite feasible to imagine a maintenance system directly accessing this data from the (future) smart device; or from a support engineer working for the motor supplier and gathering runtime information to improve maintenance across many sites and customers.   -  Now is the time to try your hand at IIoT. We suggest that a good starting point is ISA-95 unplugged: its objects, I/O and behaviors, and also control information about devices that you expect to be smart connected devices in your IIoT future.

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Cleveland Clinic takes brain health research mobile with the Healthy Brains app

Cleveland Clinic takes brain health research mobile with the Healthy Brains app | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Healthy Brain app enrolls patients in a research registry focused on brain health, providing tools to assess and manage risk factors.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine , Ramez Clinical Pharmacist, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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The Healthy Brains app includes a brain health assessment that walks you through a series of questions related to medical history and lifestyle factors. It then assigns you a brain health score and provides tips on improving your brain health by addressing reported risk factors. On the website, enrollment in the registry is also required to take this assessment.  The app also includes a memory test and can be connected to a variety of activity trackers. All of these things can be repeated over time; in fact the app encourages users to repeat the test presumably in the hopes that seeing improving scores will reinforce positive lifestyle changes and vice versa.   As indicated in the study description within the app, they are capturing data that users enter into the app for future studies – that includes demographics, medical history, lifestyle factors, results of the memory test, and information from follow-up questionnaires.The registry also serves as a recruitment pool for related clinical research such as Alzheimer’s studies, which could help reduce some of the problems these trials face with enrollment.

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The IoT hype generator

The promise and reality of the Internet of Things couldn’t be farther apart.
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The promise and reality of the Internet of Things couldn’t be farther apart.  Here’s the promise: a "system of systems"  Things are so bad that Gartner — one of tech's most respected research and advisory companies — called the Internet of Things the most hyped emerging technology of 2014:  To be fair, things being interneted is very much a new phenomenon. Wireless chips only recently became cheap enough to install as an afterthought thanks to the explosion of smartphone ownership around the world. Someday, Google and Watson and Siri and Alexa and Cortana will all find a way to make sense of the data we radiate. That time isn’t now.  - Everyone has an opinion, this is one of the less informed ones.

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Turning the internet of silos into the internet of everything

Turning the internet of silos into the internet of everything | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
If interoperability between different devices can not be achieved, the new technology’s potential will unravel. Nicole Kobie reports
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The problem. Research by McKinsey suggests that 40% of the value of the IoE will need to be unlocked via interoperability; failing to overcome that hurdle could cost trillions of dollars and leave the IoT less useful that promised.  Every major IT company wants to lead the charge, meaning each is developing its own set of standards and building proprietary systems – a problem faced by a host of other technologies that have come before. Is it too late to save the internet of things from becoming fractured into useless pieces – an internet of silos – or can the industry work together to build a true internet of everything?  Given the potential benefits, and the previous interoperability challenges faced by IT, it may seem surprising that it continues to be a problem. “It’s an issue that hasn’t gone away and was never solved,” said Justin Anderson, director of IoE firm Flexeye. “Part of the reason for that is a lot of the applications that have been created … have been stand-alone systems [and] often it’s in their interest not to open it up for all to be able to engage with.”  That single-mindedness is flawed; tech companies need to work together because failing to unlock the value in IoE could be costly. McKinsey predicts the value of IoE will top $11tn by 2025, but without interoperability will stall at $7tn.   And it’s not all about the boost to the economy. “Interoperability is vital if the internet of things is going to reach its potential, whether that is in cities, health, education or any other example,” said Maurizio Pilu , executive director for collaborative R&D at Digital Catapult. “Interoperability lowers barriers to innovation and is fundamental to the creation of participation. Additionally, and importantly, interoperability allows ideas to scale faster. For example a digital business can develop a home gadget and sell it at a DIY store knowing it will just work. Interoperability also enables data to be shared and combined – ultimately allowing many more IoT services and solutions to be developed.”  What can be done?   The standard response to improving interoperability is, well, standards. Every IoE product from a major tech company seems to come with its own set of standards, from Microsoft-backed AllSeen Alliance to the Open Interconnect Consortium , backed by Intel, Samsung and Dell, and the Thread Group , with support from ARM and Google’s Nest.  But drafting standards isn’t enough.  People need to actually use them. “The acid test is adoption. A standard that is not deployed in the millions has not yet caught on so cannot be called a standard. It’s hard to say how it will happen. Some say it will be one of the giants shipping millions of devices supporting a standard. One thing is very clear, however: for standards to be established, openness is essential.”

Pilu compared it to the web, pointing out that the “bold move” to an open commons was what made it work. “There does still remain a cultural shift to openness that we need to be aware of in IoT interoperability,” said Pilu.  Open APIs (application program interfaces) are another solution, noted Bachmann, offering access to data and systems “to provide a broader palette for developers”, and makes IoE more of a “fabric” between IT services. But that raises other problems, said Anderson. APIs are become more standardised, meaning “we’re moving in that direction to make the API the interface into that data”.

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Breakthrough data storage innovation: One DNA molecule can store tons of data for 1M years

Breakthrough data storage innovation: One DNA molecule can store tons of data for 1M years | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Genetic information stored in DNA molecules makes life on Earth possible, but what if humans could use the same kind of technology to store their own data? Apparently, scientists have figured out h...
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Apparently, scientists have figured out how to save massive quantities of information in a single molecule of DNA, which will store the data safely for up to 1 million years.  The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has “fossilized” DNA by encapsulating it in glass, The Independent reports, to prolong the life of DNA that would store data. The scientists also came up with a mathematical algorithm that lets them decipher data written in DNA code.  The scientists are using the way DNA is built to store information. DNA is based on sequences of four chemical building blocks, referred to as A, C, T, and G, which are used to code information.  “A little after the discovery of the double helix architecture of DNA, people figured out that the coding language of nature is very similar to the binary language we use in computers,” Dr. Robert Grass said. “On a hard drive, we use zeros and ones to represent data, and in DNA we have four nucleotides, A, C, T and G.”  The problem with this discovery is that there’s no affordable way of turning it into a commercial product just yet. Furthermore, reading information from a DNA drive isn’t user-friendly. You could read the entire thing, but you can’t pinpoint the location of individual data blocks stored in DNA. That’s the next challenge for the Swiss team.   “Right now, we can only read everything that’s in the drop. But I can’t point to a specific place within the drop and read only one file,” Grass said.

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