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Internet of Things security concerns prompt boost in IoT services

Internet of Things security concerns prompt boost in IoT services | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Internet of Things security concerns are quickly becoming an enterprise reality, and one vendor has been quick to offer the IoT services to combat the risks.
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News roundup:As Internet of Things concerns become an enterprise reality, one vendor is quick to offer IoT services to combat the risks. Plus: 1% of users create 75% of the risk; Target pays up; Apple devices improperly secured in the enterprise.  - Symantec now says that it covers 1B devices with its toolbox, Even after this Symantec announcement coming a week after the release of a report highlighting the potential risks of Internet of Things devices.  Sponsored by NexusGuard Ltd. and conducted by Cybersecurity Ventures,the report exposing Internet of Things security concerns noted that by the end of 2017, more than 20% of businesses will adopt IoT services to secure Internet-connected devices and networks, which will in turn advance the multi-trillion dollar IoT marketplace and boost security research and spending through 2025.  Target Corp., which experienced one of the largest retail breaches in history in 2013, has agreed to pay as much as $67 million to settle claims over the breach. In an agreement with Visa Inc. on behalf of banks and other financial institutions, the money will cover costs incurred by both Visa and its issuers during the time of the breach.  Apple's Conundrum: 45% of U.S. workers use Apple devices at work for work, the devices lack the proper security and can cause a major data security problem, according to a report commissioned by Centrify Corp. released Monday. The results of a poll of 2,249 employees found 63% of the Apple devices -- including Macs, iPads and iPhones -- are owned by the employee, yet only 51% are only secured by a password, 58% do not have software installed to enforce strong passwords, and only 17% have a company-supplied password manager installed. 56% of respondents even admitted to sharing passwords with others. The survey, conducted by Dimensional Research, also concluded that only 28% of Apple devices have a corporate mobile device management installed, and only 35% of companies enforce the use of stored data encryption. "Centrify's Apple survey spotlights the massive exposures that occur when devices do not comply with standard corporate security policies," said Bill Man, chief product officer of Centrify. "In particular, customer data represents a huge liability. It's time for IT to take action."

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Bonding: The IBM team that created reusable polymers

An unconventional team of scientists at IBM Research in Almaden, Calif., has discovered a new polymer that is recyclable without sacrificing strength. When J...
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An unconventional team of scientists at IBM Research in Almaden, Calif., has discovered a new polymer that is recyclable without sacrificing strength. When Jim Hedrick assembled this team of colorful personalities, he knew he could expect results, but he had no idea how explosive the chemistry would be. The teams unique bonds are evident both in and out of the lab. Using Jim’s work as a foundation, the team has created this new polymer with chemical bonds as strong as bone, and the capacity to be recycled an infinite number of times. Meet the creative minds and the unique personalities that orchestrated this incredible breakthrough.

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4 designs tips for AVB in-car infotainment

4 designs tips for AVB in-car infotainment | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
AVB is clearly the choice of several automotive OEMs, says Gordon Bechtel, CTO, Media Systems, Harman Connected Services. Audio Video Bridging (AVB) is a well-established standard for in-car infota...
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Audio Video Bridging (AVB) is a well-established standard for in-car infotainment, and there is a significant amount of activity for specifying and developing AVB solutions in automobiles. The primary use case for AVB is interconnecting all devices in a vehicle’s infotainment system. That includes the head unit, rear-seat entertainment systems, telematics unit, amplifier, central audio processor, as well as rear-, side- and front-view cameras.  

1. Sub-microsecond accuracy: Every AVB element on the network is hooked to the same accurate clock. The Ethernet hardware should feature a time stand to ensure packet arrival in the right order. Here, Bechtel mentioned the Atmel | SMART SAM V71 MCU that boasts screen registers to ensure advanced hardware filtering of inbound packets for routing to correct receive-end queues.

2. Low latency: There is a lot of data involved in AVB, both in terms of bit rate and packet rate. AVB allows low latency through reservations for traffic, which in turn, facilitate faster packet transfer for higher priority data. Design engineers should carefully shape the data to avoid packet bottlenecks as well as data overflow.

3. 1588 Timestamp unit: It’s a protocol for correct and accurate 802.1 AS (gPTP) support as required by AVB for precision clock synchronization. The IEEE 802.1 AS carries out time synchronization and is synonymous with generalized Precision Time Protocol or gPTP.

4) Tightly coupled memory (TCM): It’s a configurable high-performance memory access system to allow zero-wait CPU access to data and instruction memory blocks. A careful use of TCM enables much more efficient data transfer, which is especially important for AVB class A streams.  

It’s worth noting that MCUs based on ARM Cortex-M7 architecture have added the TCM capability for fast and deterministic code execution. TCM is a key enabler in running audio and video streams in a controlled and timely manner.  AVB and Cortex-M7 MCUs: The Cortex-M7 is a high-performance core with almost double the power efficiency of the older Cortex-M4. It features a six-stage superscalar pipeline with branch prediction — while the M4 has a three-stage pipeline. Bechtel of Harman acknowledged that M7 features equate to more highly optimized code execution, which is important for Class A audio implementations with lower power consumption.


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This is the 'Largest Known' Apple Malware Infection Ever

This is the 'Largest Known' Apple Malware Infection Ever | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It has been collecting usernames, passwords, and payment information.
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The Apple malware has been collecting usernames, passwords, and payment information.  Palo Alto Networks, a security firm, announced that they have been cooperating with amateur technology group WeipTech to identify a malware that has affected over 225,000 Apple accounts.  The malware, which they have called “KeyRaider,” steals iTunes usernames, passwords, and payment information. It then stores it all on a server, which is itself vulnerable to exposure, which is how WeipTech discovered it. With over 225,000 users affected, Palo Alto Networks is calling this “the largest known Apple account theft caused by malware.”   KeyRaider targets iPhones that have been “jailbroken,” meaning that they have been unlocked to allow the user to download programs that are not authorized by Apple. Although this practice gives you access past what Apple permits, it also strips your device of virtually all security measures.   Palo Alto Networks and WeipTech have discovered two iOS jailbreak tweaks, which have been downloaded upwards of 20,000 times, that allow users to get apps and in app purchases without actually purchasing them. But someone still has to pay; thus, KeyRaider. The tweaks use the malware victims’ account information to allow users to download non-free items for free. KeyRaider has also been used to lock phones and hold them for ransom.   If you haven’t jailbroken your phone, you haven’t been affected. For those of you risk-takers who have, Palo Alto Networks shows you how to determine whether or not your iPhone has been infiltrated. Also, go ahead and un-jailbreak your phone; live the cautious life with the rest of us common-folk.

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Intelligence: Criminals getting better at data exfiltration

Intelligence: Criminals getting better at data exfiltration | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Enterprises tend to be highly focused on keeping attackers out of their systems, but most of the actual damage happens not when the bad guys first break in, but when they're able to successfully steal data -- and the techniques they're using to do this are getting steadily more sophisticated
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Originally saw this posted on LinkedIn, and since it pertains to InfoSec, I pay attention, I suggest the same for you, if you work in High Tech.

 "Enterprises tend to be highly focused on keeping attackers out of their systems, but most of the actual damage happens not when the bad guys first break in, but when they're able to successfully steal data -- and the techniques they're using to do this are getting steadily more sophisticated.   One of the ways that attackers evade detection is to disguise the data before sending it out, according to a new report from Intel Security.  "They are compressing the data so that it's smaller in size, or making it look like something else," said Intel Security CTO Steve Grobman. "Or they cut it up into little pieces and send the pieces to different places, so that the attacker can then pick up all the chunks and reassemble them."  Many common, legitimate avenues can be used to do this.  For example, if a company's employees post pictures to Twitter, attackers can embed data into images so that the image still looks normal to the human eye, and attach the image to an otherwise harmless-sounding Twitter post.   "The attacker can then follow the Twitter feed," said Grobman. "It looks legitimate but it is actually smuggling data out."  Gmail can also be used to smuggle data out, especially when the traffic is encrypted, he added.  Read on the website for more 

 

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LG's new smart sensor will turn your old appliances into connected gadgets

LG's new smart sensor will turn your old appliances into connected gadgets | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Called “SmartThinQ Sensor”, it can be attached to appliances like refrigerators, washing machines, oven and air conditioner among others. There’s also the Smart Air Conditioner and Smart Lightwave Oven that LG will be showing off at the IFA 2015 later this week. The company says its latest offering can sense vibration and temperature when attached... Continue reading
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Called “SmartThinQ Sensor”, it can be attached to appliances like refrigerators, washing machines, oven and air conditioner among others. There’s also the Smart Air Conditioner and Smart Lightwave Oven that LG will be showing off at the IFA 2015 later this week.  The company says its latest offering can sense vibration and temperature when attached to devices and beam those readings back to your phone. When attached to a refrigerator, the SmartThingQ sensor will notify a smartphone that a particular food item is about to expire. A refrigerator attachment could tell you how many times the door is opened. When connected to an air conditioner or other appliance, the device will let users control the appliance remotely through the SmartThinQ app. Users can set a cooking mode on their smartphone, as well as the cooking time and temperature for a dish, and the Smart Lightwave Oven will set everything accordingly. It also diagnoses itself and helps find solutions and fix information online from an LG service center.  “Adoption of smart home appliances has been slow because of the perception that the technology is not easily accessible”, said Jo Seong-jin, president/CEO of the LG Electronics Home Appliance & Air Solution Company. At IFA 2015, LG has taken the lid off their new sensors that aim to bring your dumb appliances (devices without a wifi connection) into the future and connect them to the internet of things.

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5 ways the IoT will revolutionize healthcare

Is they Internet of Things just a lot of hype? Not when it comes to healthcare.
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1. Medication management

2. Vitals monitoring

3. Fall detection for elderly 

4. Early detection of childhood diseases

5. Inpatient care 


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“IoV”: Internet of Value - Banking Exchange

“IoV”: Internet of Value - Banking Exchange | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New protocol could usher in real-time payments First there was the internet. Then came the internet of things. Now, watch out for something called the...
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The Banking Community is starting to scramble when I read articles like this.  “The largest and smallest banks globally are trying to find alternatives to correspondent banking. It [correspondent banking] works, but is antiquated. You can literally FedEx money to Europe faster than you can wire it through your bank.”  IDC Financial Insights issued a recent study that lavishes attention on Ripple Labs.  “IDC expects payments through Ripple or similar protocols to grow exponentially in the years ahead. As such protocols supersede Bitcoin, the distinction between cryptocurrencies and new payment protocols will become clearer, and the banking industry will embrace the protocols.”   -  Here’s where the evolution begins  -  So, just as the original internet limped along through usenets that connected arcane university and government research offices until the World Wide Web made everything easy and interoperable, the internet of value is taking its first baby steps.  The fact that the United States still is just studying real-time payments—due to its extremely complicated and intertwined networks of stakeholders—while many developed countries already have established real-time domestic payments structures, illustrates where the situation stands.  Larsen puts it in perspective: “Soon most of our trading partners will be on real-time systems. But there still is a need to ensure interoperability between those fast systems. We’re at the very beginning of this internet of value.”

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3 types of data that will need to work together to run the Smart City

3 types of data that will need to work together to run the Smart City | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
There's a lot more to the IoT than just stuffing sensors in everything - data will have to work together
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(1) Traditional, boring, structured data from enterprise systems. Stuff like weather forecasts from the Meteorological Office; demographics from Government and, say; public transport performance statistics.

(2) Slightly more fun 'big data' from all sorts of social media (and other sources too).  This can be valuable for sentiment analysis; tailoring services and offers; all sorts of business-to-customer or perhaps city-to-customer relationships. New and exciting Machine-to-Machine (M2M) data. Now we’re talking! This is the stuff the Internet of Things (IoT) is made of, surely?  This is the future!  Well, yes and no.   OK, now let’s take the oft-used example of the smart waste bin to guide us through how we get from sensors, to real benefits for citizens.   The first thing you’ll hear in a typical Case of The Smart Waste Bin story is pretty simple.  If a bin has a sensor that can tell when it’s nearly full, it can call and request someone comes to empty it. Smart, huh? Like I said before, yes and no.   Trash might get emptied more often, but costs will go through the roof. Trucks could end up coming back to the same street to empty smart bins close to each other that just happened to call in their 'I’m full!' message eight hours apart. Not so smart now, huh?   Of course we can fix this. Sensors in close proximity could talk to each other to check if any other bins close by are nearly full too. Companies like Smartbin offer both sensors and a route optimisation solution for the teams tasked with emptying the trash.   (3) So here we are, already integrating M2M data and boring old structured data. Now our citizens will see the benefits of cleaner streets and they won’t be paying extra for the privilege. 

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IoT for food and water: Here’s what the future looks like

IoT for food and water: Here’s what the future looks like | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In the near future, IoT will drive tremendous innovation in the way our food is grown, processed, distributed, stored, and consumed. Plants and animals will literally have a “voice.” Not a human voice, per se, but a voice based on data that can tell people, computers, and machines when, for example, they are thirsty, need more sun, require medicine, or need individual attention.

Via massimo facchinetti
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Take vertical farms, for example. These operations bring farming indoors where all of the elements required for rapid and healthy growth can be monitored and controlled. These facilities are built vertically, so growing areas can be stacked. This greatly decreases the amount of acreage needed for farming, which allows vertical farms to be located in or near cities, shortening the time needed to transport and distribute food.   From an IoT perspective, vertical farms are connected both internally and externally. Internally, small sensors in the soil or connected to individual plants tell a control system exactly how much light, water, and, nutrients are required to grow the healthiest, most productive crops. Sensors will also tell vertical farmers when crops are nearing their peak for harvesting at just the right time to ensure it’s still fresh when it reaches its final destination.   Externally, vertical farms will be connected to other networks and information systems, including databases that track local demand. For example, local restaurants could input when they need to replenish their fresh food supplies. And vertical farmers could access that information so they know which crops to grow in what quantities. Vertical farms can also connect to the power grid, using their windows as solar panels to supply the system, creating a tight feedback loop between the food supply, the power grid, and consumers. This type of IoT system would have been unimaginable a generation ago.

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Intel unveils Maker Lab in India to focus on mobile devices, IoT - Tech2

Intel unveils Maker Lab in India to focus on mobile devices, IoT - Tech2 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Intel India on Thursday unveiled Intel India Maker Lab and Intel India Maker Showcase to power product innovation in India in Internet of Things (IoT), mobile devices and other computer focused domains.
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Google's Data Architecture and What it Takes to Work at Scale.

Google's Data Architecture and What it Takes to Work at Scale. | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Malte Schwarzkopf — currently finishing his PhD on “operating system support for warehouse-scale computing” at the University of Cambridge — has released a series of slides describing some of his research into large-scale, distributed data architectures. Schwarzkopf and his team at Cambridge Systems at Scale are aiming to build the next generation of software systems …

Via Constantin Ionel Milos / Milos Constantin
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Schwarzkopf and his team at Cambridge Systems at Scale are aiming to build the next generation of software systems for large-scale data centers. So it has been essential for him to understand how some of the current data giants are configuring their full stack at present, in order to build software for the next wave of businesses that grow with a need to work at a similar scale. Along the way, he has contributed to a number of open source projects including DIOS (a distributed operating system for warehouse-scale data centers that uses an API based on distributed objects); Firmament (a configurable cluster scheduler that looks to apply optimization analysis over a flow network); Musketeer (a workflow manager for big data analytics); and QJump (a network architecture that reduces network interference and provides latency messaging).   Schwarzkopf’s slide deck builds on his extensive bibliography into the Google stack.  His research finds that warehouse-scale computing (defined at 10,000-plus machines) requires a different software stack, all aiming to help increase the utilization of many-core machines, and allow fast, incremental stream processing and approximate analytics (like that offered by BlinkDB) on large datasets. (Many-core is a term meant to indicate a level of magnitude greater than multi-core.)   -   Schwarzkopf’s research spells out the three main characteristics that many of the largest data-driven companies like Microsoft, Twitter and Yahoo have in common with Google and Facebook:

*  “Frontend serving systems and fast backends.
*  Batch data processing systems.
*  Multi-tier structured/unstructured storage hierarchy.
*  Coordination system and cluster scheduler.”
In his presentation, “What does it take to make Google work at scale?” Schwarzkopf discusses the architecture behind those 139 microseconds between submitting a search request in the Google input bar, and the pages of ads-and-search results that are returned.

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TRIZ: A Powerful Methodology for Creative Problem-Solving

TRIZ: A Powerful Methodology for Creative Problem-Solving | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
TRIZ is a problem solving methodology based on logic, data and research, not intuition.
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Projects of all kinds frequently reach a point where as much analysis as possible has been carried out, but the way forward is still unclear. Progress seems blocked, and if the project team is to move forward, it must develop creative solutions to the problems it faces.  You'll already know about techniques such as brainstorming , which can help with this sort of situation. However, this type of approach, which depends on intuition and the knowledge of the members of the team, tends to have unpredictable and unrepeatable results. What's more, a huge range of possible solutions can be missed, simply because they're outside the experience of the project team.   TRIZ is a problem solving methodology based on logic, data and research, not intuition. It draws on the past knowledge and ingenuity of many thousands of engineers to accelerate the project team's ability to solve problems creatively. As such, TRIZ brings repeatability, predictability, and reliability to the problem-solving process with its structured and algorithmic approach.  "TRIZ" is the (Russian) acronym for the "Theory of Inventive Problem Solving." G.S. Altshuller and his colleagues in the former USSR developed the method between 1946 and 1985. TRIZ is an international science of creativity that relies on the study of the patterns of problems and solutions, not on the spontaneous and intuitive creativity of individuals or groups. More than three million patents have been analyzed to discover the patterns that predict breakthrough solutions to problems, and these have been codified within the TRIZ. body of knowledge. And it is spreading into corporate use across several parallel paths – it is increasingly common in Six Sigma processes, in project management and risk management systems, and in organizational innovation initiatives.  TRIZ research began with the hypothesis that there are universal principles of creativity that are the basis for creative innovations, and that advance technology. The idea was that if these principles could be identified and codified, they could be taught to people to make the process of creativity more predictable. The three primary findings of the last 65 years of research are as follows:

  1. Problems and solutions are repeated across industries and sciences. By classifying the "contradictions" (see later) in each problem, you can predict good creative solutions to that problem.
  2. Patterns of technical evolution tend to be repeated across industries and sciences.
  3. Creative innovations often use scientific effects outside the field where they were developed.

Much of the practice of TRIZ consists of learning these repeating patterns of problems-solutions, patterns of technical evolution and methods of using scientific effects, and then applying the general TRIZ patterns to the specific situation that confronts the developer / problem solver.

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Health innovations need much more than research

Health innovations need much more than research | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The challenges of developing and scaling up health innovations go beyond research. They need careful consideration.
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Health outcomes are determined by a complex web of social, environmental and governance issues. A new multidisciplinary, cross-sectoral approach to research was referenced explicitly throughout the conference — often as a salutary example of the kind of collaboration that can help translate research into innovation.

There was another well-recognised aspect of good innovation practice shaping the new-look Forum: the notion of involving the ‘end user’ early on. The Philippines, for example, which hosted the meeting, had a substantive influence on the Forum’s agenda. This focused on discussing how to marshal support from influential people in policy and finance so as to get health innovations to large numbers of the most vulnerable people.   Most chronically poor people now live in middle-income countries like the Philippines. So as, in his welcome address, the Filipino president said he was looking forward to solutions to the problems exercising his government, the organisers could argue they had aligned themselves to demand.

Although it is too early to tell whether this framing has supported the mainstreaming of innovations in any of the 72 countries attending the forum, the organisers’ emphasis did bring into focus health innovation issues that need to be carefully addressed.  Practical approaches:  Firstly, there is little understanding among health researchers of the practicalities of ‘scaling’. The meeting participants assumed that any innovation worth developing is also worth scaling up — there was no considered discussion on the limits.  Glen Mays, of the University of Kentucky, pointed out that there is a science to scaling: a separate research protocol would be required for efficient rollout. Shelly Batra, of the NGO Operation ASHA, presented some interesting reflections on enabling conditions for scaling, and some instructive examples of failure.  Unhelpful assumptions:  Delegates and speakers certainly endorsed the value of policy engagement. There were also sessions addressing new modes of engagement like social media. Again, though, there were some assumptions that need to be challenged.


First, there was an overwhelming notion that speeding up peer review would be the most critical step in expediting the process of innovation. This may help to build the necessary body of knowledge, but it fails to listen to what end users want to know as well as how and when they seek that information.  More fundamentally, however, these discussions on policy engagement tended to revert to research as opposed to innovation — or to underplay the development process for services or products as distinct from academic research.  An example of this was the discussion on systematic reviews — very useful for the academic community and crucial for development policy. The Cochrane Library serves the health sector well in this regard; 3ie also provides valuable reviews. But most systematic review repositories face the challenges of visibility and versatility: you need to know they are there (they are not built for aggregator services, which would make it easier to find them online).   Also, systematic reviews themselves are effectively supply-led — a policy maker has little space to refine the question tackled by a review or adjust it to their context.  Technical innovation is needed to make these systematic review collections more dynamic. There also needs to be a form of systemic review to gather and assess innovations, not just research papers.  The next forum is in three years and, given the current strategic framing, we can be sure it will be in another middle-income country. Meanwhile, may the innovation continue


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Gartner's 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Tech Identifies Computing Innovations That Organizations Should Monitor

Gartner's 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Tech Identifies Computing Innovations That Organizations Should Monitor | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The journey to digital business continues as the key theme of Gartner, Inc.'s
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The journey to digital business continues as the key theme of Gartner, Inc.'s "Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2015." New to the Hype Cycle this year is the emergence of technologies that support what Gartner defines as digital humanism — the notion that people are the central focus in the manifestation of digital businesses and digital workplaces. The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies report is the longest-running annual Hype Cycle, providing a cross-industry perspective on the technologies and trends that business strategists, chief innovation officers, R&D leaders, entrepreneurs, global market developers and emerging-technology teams should consider in developing emerging-technology portfolios.   "The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies is the broadest aggregate Gartner Hype Cycle, featuring technologies that are the focus of attention because of particularly high levels of interest, and those that Gartner believes have the potential for significant impact," said Betsy Burton, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. "This year, we encourage CIOs and other IT leaders to dedicate time and energy focused on innovation, rather than just incremental business advancement, while also gaining inspiration by scanning beyond the bounds of their industry."  Major changes in the 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies (see Figure 1) include the placement of autonomous vehicles, which have shifted from pre-peak to peak of the Hype Cycle. While autonomous vehicles are still embryonic, this movement still represents a significant advancement, with all major automotive companies putting autonomous vehicles on their near-term roadmaps. Similarly, the growing momentum (from post-trigger to pre-peak) in connected-home solutions has introduced entirely new solutions and platforms enabled by new technology providers and existing manufacturers.

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iPhone Could Double As A Smoke Detector, Apple Patent Reveals

iPhone Could Double As A Smoke Detector, Apple Patent Reveals | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Apple could also build the device, revealed in a patent, into its Apple Watches and Apple TV.
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Your next iPhone could play double duty as a smoke detector. The smartphone could have the ability to take on a fire safety role, without the need to be mounted to a ceiling, an invention from Apple reveals.

A patent granted to Apple and published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Tuesday, titled “Wireless Device Networks with Smoke Detection Capabilities,” details how the company could build in a smoke detector within its iPhones, iPads and Macs. Once smoke is picked up by the sensor, the device could transmit alerts to another electronic device along with a graphic or map displaying where the smoke alert was triggered.

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Nest thermostat retooled with a bigger display, furnace monitoring

Nest thermostat retooled with a bigger display, furnace monitoring | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Google's Nest division is releasing a new version of its thermostat that has a bigger display and is a little smarter than its predecessor.
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Google-owned Nest is releasing a new version of its thermostat that has a larger display and is a little smarter than its predecessor.

The high-resolution display is 2 inches in diameter, or 40 percent larger than the second generation model, making it easier to read from a distance. The thermostat also has a slightly thinner profile.

There's a new feature called Furnace Heads-Up, which allows the device check in on furnace activity. Twice a year, the thermostat will look at furnace shut-off patterns to determine if there's an overheating problem. If suspicious activity is detected, users will be notified on the display, through the Nest app and in their monthly Nest report.  Owners of first and second generation thermostats will get the feature later this year, through a free software update.   Nest can already detect when a person is nearby and turn on its display. The new model gets a feature called Farsight, which can spot people when they're farther away, like across the room, and allow the display to come on then too. It's presumably easier to see from a distance because it's bigger.

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3D-printed Organs, Smart Bandages & other HealthTech will save lives

3D-printed Organs, Smart Bandages & other HealthTech will save lives | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
From 3D-printed organs to cancer-fighting nanotech, the most important branch of technology right now is the one that will keep you living longer and stronger.

Via TechinBiz, Farid Mheir, Jake D'Imperio gis
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For many of our woes in life, there are solutions and answers, we just need to think how to do it intelligently.  

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Kristina Buno's curator insight, August 12, 2015 6:12 AM

It is amazing how technology helps us everyday with our health!

Farid Mheir's curator insight, August 14, 2015 10:15 AM

Watch the 2 min video at the end that explains how a 3d printed meniscus was used to replace a sheep one with success. 

Jake D'Imperio gis's curator insight, August 27, 2015 5:16 PM

This artical shines light on the amazing medical technology  being developed today, I hadn't even heard of any of these technologies until this artical brought them to my attention. These medical technologies will save lives and prolong them too on a global scale as many will become cheaper and more accessible over time. Personally I believe that these technologies are some of the best things humans create as we solve the mysteries of the body.

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Los Angeles police roll out new body cameras

Los Angeles police roll out new body cameras | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The LAPD becomes one of the biggest police departments in the country to begin implementing body cameras. The decision was made in an effort to improve relations between communities and the police. Mireya Villareal reports.
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The 3rd Largest Police Department just decided that they will be deploying body cameras for its force.  See video

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Independent power to boost the IoT’ lift off

Independent power to boost the IoT’ lift off | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
General Dwight D. Eisenhower is reported to have said that “you will not find it difficult to prove that battles, campaigns, and even wars have been won or
Richard Platt's insight:

As the efficiency of energy harvesting improves, the range of applications for self-powered sensors goes on expanding (examples of these possibilities can be found in this recent [August 2015] White Paper from EnOcean on “Energy Harvesting Wireless Power for the Internet of Things”).   When everything is said and done, the “Internet of Things” expression among similar terms (e.g., “ubiquitous computing”, “connected objects”, “Industry 4.0”, etc.) is akin to an umbrella that embraces a profound societal transformation, i.e., the insertion, thanks to the timely convergence of a multitude of mutually-reinforcing trends, of almost anything and everything into the communications fabric. This is a tall order, which we can barely comprehend and whose power equation cannot be solved only through conventional means.  While battery reliability, safety and storage capacity continue to benefit from impressive technological achievements, and offer undeniable possibilities, they will not be enough to support the anticipated wide expansion of the Internet of Things. There will be places where changing batteries (e.g., when completely drained or defective) will be too risky or costly and where power will be required to be scavenged from ambient sources.   While independently powering “things” with size, weight, and capabilities of the likes of smartphones and tablets is not yet within reach (we are about 2 to 3 orders of magnitude below that), energy harvesting is advancing by leaps and bounds, making it, at least for the time being, well suited for low-power devices.

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IFTTT's Maker Channel Connects Your Electronics Projects To Nearly Everything

IFTTT's Maker Channel Connects Your Electronics Projects To Nearly Everything | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
One of the big problems with DIY electronics projects is connecting them to the internet as a whole. Now, with If This Then That’s new Maker cha...
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One of the big problems with DIY electronics projects is connecting them to the internet as a whole. Now, with If This Then That’s new Maker channel, getting your Raspberry Pi or Arduino projects online is easier than ever.   With the Maker Channel, you’re basically building web hooks that trigger other events. For instance, if you press a button on something connected to a Raspberry Pi, that can trigger any of IFTTT’s other actions. For example, press a button and send an email. Basically, it makes the internet of things a little more accessible and easy to program for. MakeUseOf has a great guide and some samples for getting started with the new channel.

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Internet in space: nbn's plan to bring broadband to rural Australia

Internet in space: nbn's plan to bring broadband to rural Australia | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
nbn is set to launch two satellites to bring high speed broadband to rural Australia. Here's how they work.
Richard Platt's insight:

The nbn – formerly the National Broadband Network – was established with a mandate to provide broadband to all Australians.

A key challenge in realising this goal is addressing the widening gap in the digital connectivity between the bush and urban areas. The initial estimates suggest approximately 1 million premises would be outside fixed line coverage by 2021. Satellite and fixed wireless technologies are bridging this gap.    As such, nbn has ordered two purpose-built satellites based on Space Systems Loral’s 1300 Series Satellite Platform. The satellites are named Sky Muster, which was chosen by competition.   The company also plans to explore a third satellite post-2021. The first of these two satellites, Sky Muster NBN-1A, is due to be launched within two months. But nbn is still waiting for a launch date for its second satellite, Sky Muster NBN-1B. These satellites will be placed in geosynchronous Earth orbits (GEO) located 36,000km above the equator.

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Europe doesn't properly recycle most of its electronic waste

Europe doesn't properly recycle most of its electronic waste | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
You probably know that you should recycle your old tech when you're done with it, but getting other people to do the same? That's quite hard, apparently. The Un...
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The United Nations and INTERPOL have found that only 35 percent of the European Union's electronic waste in 2012, about 3.2 million imperial tons, was recycled properly. The rest (6.1 million tons) was either exported, recycled improperly or trashed. And that's a problem beyond just the expected environmental issues, such as toxins making their way into landfills. Many crooks take advantage of this lapse by scavenging and smuggling e-waste -- that old laptop you chucked out might be a gold mine for a bootlegger hoping to sell its parts or raw metals.   So what is the EU to do? Researchers suggest tighter coordination between police and other relevant outfits, for one thing. They're likewise proposing a much tougher legal stance, including mandatory disposal standards and a ban on cash transactions in scrap metal sales. Whether or not those efforts would be enough is another matter.

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​Formula 1 racing: Sensors, data, speed, and the IoT

​Formula 1 racing: Sensors, data, speed, and the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The CIO of Williams Martini Racing explains how the famous team instruments both cars and drivers in the quest of win.
Richard Platt's insight:

It's a highly technical sport and the technology constantly evolves.

The world of Formula 1 racing is fascinating and so I invited the Chief Information Officer of Williams Martini Racing to be a guest on CXOTalk. Williams is one of the foremost names in Grand Prix racing and its CIO, Graeme Hackland, has worked in the sport for many years.   During the CXOTalk conversation, Graeme discusses the technology and infrastructure Williams uses to conduct it's racing activities. Imagine a complete technology infrastructure that travels from track-to-track around the world, supporting the race cars and team.  Here is the entire video of that discussion (click through to view):

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Israeli IoT Company Augury raises $7M

Israeli IoT Company Augury raises $7M | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The predictive machine diagnostics company is attempting to redefine the predictive maintenance market.
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Predictive machine diagnostics company Augury today announced a $7 million Series A funding round led by Formation 8 Hardware Fund and joined by Pritzker Group Venture Capital. Existing investor First Round Capital and Lerer Hippeau Ventures also participated in the funding. The capital will be used to accelerate product development, expand Augury’s sales and marketing and support the company’s ongoing growth.  Augury has offices in New York and Haifa in Israel.   Augury is attempting to redefine the predictive maintenance market, one that has remained inaccessible and expensive for decades. Augury is bringing its proprietary algorithms, smart sensing device and mobile diagnostics tool to new markets, starting with diagnosing HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems within commercial buildings. The company’s technology has the potential to save billions of dollars in maintenance and energy costs. In doing so, Augury is helping to create a much larger market for predictive maintenance and will eventually expand its reach to diagnosing the IoT (Internet of Things).  

Augury CEO Saar Yoskovitz said, “Augury is ‘Shazam’ for machines. Using smartphone technology, it has made IoT accessible and affordable for legacy systems and large industries. Formation 8 recognizes Augury as a future market leader in the Industrial IoT space, with the potential to capture the multi-billion dollar market opportunity in front of it. Additionally, Formation 8 Hardware Fund is a recognized leader when it comes to investing at the intersection of hardware and software and we are thrilled to work with the team and our other new partners to take advantage of the real strategic value they bring to the table."

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