Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Researcher finds over 300,000 servers still Heartbleed-vulnerable

Researcher finds over 300,000 servers still Heartbleed-vulnerable | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Back in April, discoveries made headlines over a vulnerability in OpenSSL known as Heartbleed. The flaw in OpenSSL, a software library for the protection and security of websites, was uncovered and reported it to the OpenSSL team, triggering widespread awareness and advice on what steps administrators ...
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Placing the Heartbleed events in perspective, Greg Kumparak, mobile editor at TechCrunch, said on Sunday that "There's a really good reason why security researchers were so spooked by the Heartbleed bug: there's just no silver bullet. Even if we somehow banded together to get most of the world's systems patched, a big chunk of the Internet would likely be left vulnerable. Sure enough, Heartbleed beats on."
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73% of Executives Are Researching & Launching IoT Projects In 2017

73% of Executives Are Researching & Launching IoT Projects In 2017 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
73% of senior executives are either researching or currently deploying IoT. The IoT platform market is expected to grow 35% per year to $1.16B by 2020. These and many other fascinating findings are from Verizon’s State of the Market: Internet of Things 2017, Making way for the enterprise
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Key takeaways from the study include the following:

  • Manufacturing-based IoT connections grew 84% between 2016 and 2017, followed by energy & utilities (41%). Transportation and distribution (40%), smart cities and communities (19%) and healthcare and pharma (11%) are the remaining three industries tracked in the study who had positive growth in the number of IoT connections. The following graphic compares year-over-year growth by industry for the 2016 to 2017 timeframe.
  • Manufacturing is predicted to lead IoT spending in 2017 with $183B invested this year. Verizon’s study predicts that transportation and utilities will have the second and third-largest capital expenses in IoT this year. Insurance, consumer and cross-industry IoT investments including connected vehicles and smart buildings will see the fastest overall growth in 2017.
  • The IoT platform market is expected to grow 35% per year to $1.16B by 2020. From well-established enterprise service providers to startups, the platform market is becoming one of the most competitive within the global IoT ecosystem. The design objective of all IoT platforms is to provide a single environment for enabling API, Web Services and custom integrations that securely support enterprise-wide applications. Please see the post What Makes An Internet Of Things (IoT) Platform Enterprise-Ready? for an overview of the Boston Consulting Group’srecent IoT study, Who Will Win The IoT Platform Wars?
  • Improving the customer experience and excel at customer service by gaining greater insights using IoT leaders enterprises’ investment priorities. 33% of enterprises interviewed prioritize using IoT technologies and the insights it’s capable of providing to excel at customer service. 26% intend to use IoT technologies to improve asset management and increase Return on Assets (ROA) and Return on Invested Capital (ROIC). Consistent with how dominant manufacturing’s investment plans are for IoT this year, production and delivery capabilities are the top deployment priority for 25% of all businesses interviewed.
  • IoT has the potential to revolutionize pharmaceutical supply chains by drastically reducing drug counterfeiting globally. It’s estimated that counterfeit drugs cost the industry between $75B to $200B annually. The human costs of treating those who have been sold counterfeit drugs back to health are incalculable. IoT platforms and systems have the potential to drastically reduce the costs of counterfeiting, both on a personal impact and market standpoint. Drug manufacturers operating in the United States have until November 2017 to mark packages with a product identifier, serial number, lot number and expiration date, plus electronically store and transfer all transaction histories, including shipment information, across their distribution supply chains. Pharmaceutical manufacturers have a high level of urgency to make this happen and stay in compliance with the US Drug Supply Chain Security Act. IoT solutions are flourishing in this industry as a result.
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Israel Hacked Kaspersky, Caught Russian Spies Hacking American Spies, But...

Israel Hacked Kaspersky, Caught Russian Spies Hacking American Spies, But... | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Israeli government hackers hacked into Kaspersky’s network in 2015 and caught Russian government hackers red-handed hacking US government hackers with the help of Kaspersky.
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Very interesting reading, that is if you like spies and counter terrorists stories that I've been reading about since the 1980's.  This stuff these days is about digital versions of those.  -- According to a story published today by the New York Times, Israeli government hackers hacked into Kaspersky’s network in 2015 and caught Russian government hackers red-handed hacking US government hackers with the help of Kaspersky.
In other words — Russia spying on America, Israel spying on Russia and America spying on everyone.

What the F^#% is going around?

It is like one is blaming another for doing exactly the same thing it is doing against someone else. Wow!   --  Well, the fact that everyone is spying on everyone is neither new nor any secret. However, somehow now Kaspersky Labs is at the centre of this international espionage tale for its alleged devil role.
Just last week, the Wall Street Journal, an American media agency, published a story against the Kaspersky, a Russian antivirus provider, claiming that the Russian government hackers stole highly classified NSA documents and hacking tools in 2015 from a staffer's home PC with the help of Kaspersky Antivirus.
Even if the incident is real, quoting multiple anonymous sources from US intelligence community, Wall Street Journal article failed to provide any substantial evidence to prove if Kaspersky was intentionally involved with the Russian spies or some hackers simply exploited any zero-day vulnerability in the Antivirus product.

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This is what a $10,500, 17-lens camera looks like

This is what a $10,500, 17-lens camera looks like | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Samsung 360 Round is also about the size of a Roomba.
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With 17 lenses and a $10,500 price tag, Samsung's 360 Round camera is not messing around.  Equipped with two pairs of eight lenses and one in the center staring up, the 360 Round is designed for pros and enthusiasts to capture and livestream 3D video and audio, specifically for creating VR content.   It's hefty, and about the size of a Roomba (when Samsung first announced it, I thought it looked like a many-eyed hockey puck, until I actually saw it with my own eyes).   Far outside the reach of the average Joe or Joanne, the 360 Round is still a notable foray into high-end capture from a company that's been steadily pushing into the consumer VR space with its lineup of Gear VR headset and 360 cameras. This is Samsung's way of inching a little bit deeper into the VR world.

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Power semiconductor sales rebounded in 2016 and will continue to grow through 2021

Power semiconductor sales rebounded in 2016 and will continue to grow through 2021 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Global power semiconductor revenues grew year-over-year by 3.9 percent in 2016, reversing a 4.8 percent decline in 2015.
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The automotive and industrial segments were particularly strong in 2016, with power semis in automotive growing by 7.0 percent and industrial by 5.0 percent. Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) – such as blind-spot detection, collision avoidance, and adaptive cruise control – are moving from luxury to mid-level vehicles, driving double digit increases for power semiconductors in that category.  Power semiconductors, especially power modules and discretes also saw sharp gains as the number of cars equipped with inverter systems for advanced start/stop and hybrid powertrains increased. In particular, power modules for cars and light trucks jumped 29.3 percent in 2016.  In the broad industrial sector the drive for energy efficiency improvement led to growth in renewable energy (solar and wind inverters), building and home control, and factory automation applications. Revenues from home appliances in the consumer segment also grew nicely as advanced motor control systems found their way into white goods, fans, kitchen, and cleaning products.

Despite good gains, other categories were flat to down. Power module sales for industrial motor drives, a large sub-segment, slid 1.1 percent and modules for traction applications were down 17.5 percent for the year.  Power ICs for consumer application declined 4.9 percent while power discretes for lighting applications were off 2.7 percent. 

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Must-read Blogs for AI and Deep Learning Enthusiasts

Must-read Blogs for AI and Deep Learning Enthusiasts | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In this post, we have listed down some influential and informative Deep Learning and AI blogs which an AI enthusiast must read.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Mini Electric GoKart

Mini Electric GoKart | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
There are quite a few GoKart Instructables here and in order to build mine I had to browse them all, The forums were also incredibly useful. What I will try t

Via Jinbuhm Kim
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For those of you wanting to get your kids in on the act of all electric vehicles, see these

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IC makers maximize 300mm, 200mm wafer capacity 

IC makers maximize 300mm, 200mm wafer capacity  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A total of 25 new 300mm wafer fabs is expected between 2016 and 2021 as the outlook for 450mm wafers fades.
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With the prospects of large 450mm wafers going nowhere, IC manufacturers are increasing efforts to maximize fabrication plants using 300mm and 200mm diameter silicon substrates. The number of 300mm wafer production-class fabs in operation worldwide is expected to increase each year between now and 2021 to reach 123 compared to 98 in 2016, according to the forecast in IC Insights’ Global Wafer Capacity 2017-2021 report.

As shown  300mm wafers represented 63.6% of worldwide IC fab capacity at the end of 2016 and are projected to reach 71.2% by the end of 2021, which translates into a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.1% in terms of silicon area for processing by plant equipment in the five-year period.   Even though 300mm wafers are now the majority wafer size in use, both in terms of total surface area and in actual quantity of wafers, there is still much life remaining in 200mm fabs, the capacity report concludes.  IC production capacity on 200mm wafers is expected to increase every year through 2021, growing at a CAGR of 1.1% in terms of total available silicon area. However, the share of the IC industry’s monthly wafer capacity represented by 200mm wafers is forecast to drop from 28.4% in 2016 to 22.8% in 2021.  IC Insights believes there is still much life left in 200mm fabs because not all semiconductor devices are able to take advantage of the cost savings 300mm wafers can provide.  Fabs running 200mm wafers will continue to be profitable for many more years for the fabrication of numerous types of ICs, such as specialty memories, display drivers, microcontrollers, and RF and analog products.  In addition, 200mm fabs are also used for manufacturing MEMS-based “non-IC” products such as accelerometers, pressure sensors, and actuators, including acoustic-wave RF filtering devices and micro-mirror chips for digital projectors and displays, as well as power discrete semiconductors and some high-brightness LEDs.

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MEMS & Sensors Companies Compete for Tech Showcase

MEMS & Sensors Industry Group announces five finalists for Technology Showcase at MEMS & Sensors Executive Congress, November 1-2, in Napa Valley
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What you'll need when the big Internet of Things breakout occurs

What you'll need when the big  Internet of Things breakout occurs | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Understand what your business needs to know before use of the Internet of Things (IoT) finally explodes.
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Interconnection at the edge:  Interconnection is defined as private data exchange between businesses, and it is an essential component of just about any IoT architecture. IoT applications simply aren’t built to function in silos. The machine-to-machine communication at the heart of the IoT can’t be centralized – it flows from dispersed devices located anywhere. For all this information to have optimal, real-time value, it needs to be stored, handled and processed close to where it’s created, which is at the digital edge, where commerce, population centers and digital ecosystems meet.   Interconnection enables proximity between users, IoT devices and cloud services at the digital edge. That means maximum efficiency, privacy, security and performance for the data flows crisscrossing through the heart of every IoT application.   Gartner’s “Edge Manifesto” highlights the importance of this proximity for digital business as the IoT will only increase traffic, storage and computing needs.

“Moving data centers' processing and content delivery/collection closer to the sources and sinks of this information, including cloud onramps and offramps, offers significant benefits and spawns new business models,” Gartner writes. “This is the essence of the ‘edge manifesto.’”  It adds, “The use of smaller, distributed, connected data centers (perhaps space in colocation centers), closer to concentrations of users and generators of content (‘pushing things to the edge’), will be required for these workloads.”   The IDC report, “Edge IT: The Engine Powering Digital Transformation” also preaches the power of proximity to the edge, saying edge-based IT environments are the “foundation for innovation” for several trends, including the IoT.

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Top Pentagon Weapon's Buyer Looks To Shift Most Programs Back To The Armed Services

Top Pentagon Weapon's Buyer Looks To Shift Most Programs Back To The Armed Services | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Pentagon's new top weapons buyer hopes to offload day-to-day oversight of most major acquisition programs from the department--with a few exceptions.
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The Pentagon’s top weapons buyer is looking to shift oversight of the bulk of major defense programs back to the U.S. armed services, she said in her first public appearance since her confirmation.  In what would be a fundamental change for the Pentagon, Ellen Lord, former Textron CEO and new head of the department’s Acquisition, Technology and Logistics (AT&L) office, hopes to offload day-to-day management of most major defense acquisition programs from the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), she said Oct. 12 at the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual symposium in Washington.   “Congress has been very, very clear in the National Defense Authorization Act [NDAA] that they want to shift oversight of most programs back to the services, and I entirely agree with that,” Lord said, referring to the 2016 legislation that aimed to reform the Pentagon’s sluggish acquisition system. “I’m reviewing all the major defense programs right now and looking at transitioning the bulk of those back.”   However, joint programs that span multiple services such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter should be the exception, Lord noted.    “Where I think it makes sense to stay with [OSD] is where they are very joint, just like a corporation—when you have a major program it goes to the boss,” Lord explained. “They already have exceptionally high risk and high stakes; those are the programs that stay within AT&L.”

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Cryo-electron microscopy wins chemistry Nobel

Cryo-electron microscopy wins chemistry Nobel | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson share the prize for developing a technique to image biomolecules.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Just plain old scientific coolness, 3 guys share Nobel prize for developing a technique to image biomolecules. 

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Prefab buildings by Ten Fold Engineering build themselves in eight minutes

Prefab buildings by Ten Fold Engineering build themselves in eight minutes | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Our latest movie features modular structures that can be transported anywhere on a lorry and self-deployed at the touch of a button

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The TRIZ Inventive Principle - "Nested" Doll on display in this example of modular structures designed by Ten Fold Engineering, which can be transported anywhere on a lorry and self-deployed at the touch of a button - friggin cool is all I have to say.

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6 Reasons You Should Skip iPhone X and Just Get iPhone 8

6 Reasons You Should Skip iPhone X and Just Get iPhone 8 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
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Don’t have a grand to blow on a new phone? You’re not settling if you buy the iPhone 8 or iPhone 8 Plus. In fact, there are several reasons to choose these lower-cost alternatives over Apple’s ultra-premium flagship (particularly if you’re eyeing the iPhone 8 Plus).  Here’s why you should skip the iPhone X and get the iPhone 8 or iPhone 8 Plus instead.  Both the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus boast bigger and faster camera sensors -- just like the iPhone X -- to deliver richer colors, faster autofocus and better low-light performance. The iPhone 8 Plus’ dual lenses are so great, we named it our top camera phone overall, beating out the Galaxy Note 8

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3D printer runs Linux on BeagleBone, focuses on ease of use

3D printer runs Linux on BeagleBone, focuses on ease of use | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The “Voladd 3D Printer” features a Linux-driven BeagleBone SBC that connects to a cloud-based sharing site, plus a unique cartridge and cooling system.

Via Jinbuhm Kim
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The “Voladd 3D Printer” features a Linux-driven BeagleBone SBC that connects to a cloud-based sharing site, plus a unique cartridge and cooling system.

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3 Big Reasons to Get the Pixel 2 XL Over the Pixel 2

3 Big Reasons to Get the Pixel 2 XL Over the Pixel 2 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
While both the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are great phones, the Google’s bigger phone is well worth the extra money. Here’s why.
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Samsung's DeX is a clever way to turn your phone into a desktop computer. However, there's one overriding problem: you probably don't have a good reason to use it instead of a PC. And Samsung is trying to fix that. It's unveiling Linux on Galaxy, an app-based offering that (surprise) lets you run Linux distributions on your phone. Ostensibly, it's aimed at developers who want to bring their work environment with them wherever they go. You could dock at a remote office knowing that your setup will be the same as usual.  It's not quite the same as your typical Ubuntu or Debian install. Linux on Galaxy launches through an app, and it's using the same kernel as Android itself in order to maintain performance. And it almost goes without saying that you'll really want a DeX setup, since most Linux apps are expecting a large screen, mouse and keyboard.  As it stands, you'll have to be patient. Linux on Galaxy isn't available right now -- you can sign up for alerts, but it's not ready for public consumption. Even so, this is good evidence that Samsung thinks of DeX as considerably more than a novelty feature. It may be a long, long while (if ever) before many people are using their phones as desktops, but Samsung is willing to gradually build up its ecosystem and eventually give you an incentive to take a second look.

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Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistance 

Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistance  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Crystalline tungsten shows insight and promise in addressing the challenges of electrical interconnects that have high resistivity at the nanoscale.
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Author Pengyuan Zheng noted that both the 2013 and 2015 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) called for new materials to replace copper as interconnect material to limit resistance increase at reduced scale and minimize both power consumption and signal delay.  In their study, Zheng and co-author Daniel Gall chose tungsten because of its asymmetric Fermi surface — its electron energy structure. This made it a good candidate to demonstrate the anisotropic resistivity effect at the small scales of interest. “The bulk material is completely isotropic, so the resistivity is the same in all directions,” Gall said. “But if we have thin films, then the resistivity varies considerably.”  To test the most promising orientations, the researchers grew epitaxial W(001) and W(110) films on substrates and conducted resistivity measurements of both while immersed in liquid nitrogen at 77 Kelvin (about -196 degrees Celsius) and at room temperature, or 295 Kelvin. “We had roughly a factor of 2 difference in the resistivity between the 001 oriented tungsten and 110 oriented tungsten,” Gall said, but they found considerably smaller resistivity in the W(011) layers.

Although the measured anisotropic resistance effect was in good agreement with what they expected from calculations, the effective mean free path — the average distance electrons can move before scattering against a boundary — in the thin film experiments was much larger than the theoretical value for bulk tungsten.  “An electron travels through a wire on a diagonal, it hits a surface, gets scattered, and then continues traveling until it hits something else, maybe the other side of the wire or a lattice vibration,” Gall said. “But this model looks wrong for small wires.”  The experimenters believe this may be explained by quantum mechanical processes of the electrons that arise at these limited scales. Electrons may be simultaneously touching both sides of the wire or experiencing increased electron-phonon (lattice vibrations) coupling as the layer thickness decreases, phenomena that could affect the search for another metal to replace copper interconnects.

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A Closer Look at North Korea’s Internet - TrendLabs Security Intelligence Blog

A Closer Look at North Korea’s Internet - TrendLabs Security Intelligence Blog | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
This blog post summarizes our findings from studying internet traffic going in and out of North Korea. It reviews its small IP space of 1024 routable IP addresses. It will also cover spam waves that originate in part from spambots in the country, DDoS attacks against North Korean websites and their relation to real-world events, as well as recurring watering hole attacks on North Korean websites.

Via Constantin Ionel Milos / Milos Constantin
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This blog post summarizes our findings from studying internet traffic going in and out of North Korea. It reviews its small IP space of 1024 routable IP addresses. It will also cover spam waves that originate in part from spambots in the country, DDoS attacks against North Korean websites and their relation to real-world events, as well as recurring watering hole attacks on North Korean websites.

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Artificial intelligence and the future of industry

Artificial intelligence and the future of industry | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Hot off the heels of Codex’s Top 50 Innovators from the Industries of the Future, Vidhya Karthikeyan reflects on the event.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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My research is about using AI and big data to enable BT to architect future networks that deliver future services. I talked about the challenges service operators like BT face in delivering a huge variety of services (TV, voice, connected home, data centres) over an underlying broadband network. I presented some of our exciting research on using network and service performance data to predict network outages and improve the quality of the TV service we deliver over broadband. It was great to be able to showcase and discuss our research at a forum of top innovators from a diverse background.  Dr Mirko Kovac, Director of the Aerial Robotics Lab at Imperial College, London, addressed the potential roles for cooperative robots in our future smart cities.   He described the design of drones that take water samples, automate fault repair, deliver emergency response in rural locations and contribute to cargo transport in big cities.

Dr Caroline Hargrove of McLaren Applied Technologies described McLaren’s approach to enabling rapid decision making and the role of real time adaptive learning systems in empowering decision makers.

Three things stood out to me from the discussions:

  1. Citizen data science is here to stay and it is important for expert data scientists to be involved in the development of tools that allow the right insights to be derived from the right data.
  2. Data curation plays a key role in the future of AI and big data. We need to take a scientific approach to understanding the vast volumes of data organisations like BT collect over time. We need to come to grips with how pieces of data evolve, age and relate to each other.
  3. There are also challenges around AI adoption, particularly in its explainability and the need to be able to justify decisions to organisations as well as customers.
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A massive adoption of laser technologies for semiconductor manufacturing | Solid State Technology

A massive adoption of laser technologies for semiconductor manufacturing | Solid State Technology | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
According to Yole Développement (Yole), the laser equipment market will grow at a 15% CAGR between 2016 and 2022 and should reach more than US$4 billion by 2022.
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In its latest report titled Laser Technologies for Semiconductor Manufacturing, the market research and strategy consulting company details the status of this industry, mainly driven by dicing, via drilling and patterning in PCB flex and PCB HDI, IC substrates and semiconductor device processing.   Drivers of laser methods differ from one process step to another. However, there are similar and common drivers for applicability of lasers to semiconductor and PCB processing applications. The key trends driving laser applicability and contributing to its growth are:

   •  The desire for die size reduction and thus further miniaturization of devices driven by computers, hand-held electronic devices such as mobile phones, tablets and electronic book readers, wearable devices and consumer electronics.
•  Demand for increased yield and throughput.
•  Better die quality.
•  The need to inspect voids and particles through a transparent material such as glass, which requires the use of laser methods.
•  Laser annealing for very high flexibility.


However, the choice of the most suitable laser processing type depends strongly on the material to be processed, processing parameters, and the manufacturing process step.  Laser type is defined by parameters such as wavelength, emitting UV, green, or IR light, for example, as well as the duration of pulse, for example nanosecond, picosecond or femtosecond. Users must consider which pulse length and wavelength is right for their semiconductor process step and application.  Nanosecond lasers are the most commonly used type of laser applied in semiconductor manufacturing and PCB processing, with more than 60% market share. They are followed by picosecond, CO2 and femtosecond lasers. In the case of dicing step, the choice of laser type also depends on the material and substrate to be diced. For low dielectric constant (low-k) materials, nanosecond and picosecond UV lasers are used to optimize optical absorption. Picosecond and femtosecond IR lasers are typically used for cutting glass and sapphire substrates but not singulating SiC substrates.

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Artificial Intelligence in Health Care: Are the Legal Algorithms Ready for the Future?

Artificial Intelligence in Health Care: Are the Legal Algorithms Ready for the Future? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Posted By Dr. Anastasia Greenberg Big data has become a buzz word, a catch-all term representing a digital reality that is already changing the world and replacing oil as the newest lucrative commodity. But, it is often overlooked that big data alone is literally useless – much like unrefined oil. If big data is the…

Via Thierry Kermorvant, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Big data has become a buzz word, a catch-all term representing a digital reality that is already changing the world and replacing oil as the newest lucrative commodity. But, it is often overlooked that big data alone is literally useless – much like unrefined oil.

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‘The tragedy of the commons’ in the IoT ecosystem

‘The tragedy of the commons’ in the IoT ecosystem | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It will take collective action from the entire IoT ecosystem to reduce device vulnerabilities and defend against malicious actors
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The most significant party to look at is the device manufacturers. Manufacturers have the responsibility to build devices that are safe to connect to the network and that means operating system (OS) and application hardening, and automatic updates. While there some standards for devices, because of the wildly diverse nature of IoT devices — from sensors to cameras to home network storage — you need to build device-to-device standards.  There’s also a fundamental problem where today many consumer devices are built in Asia for $2 apiece and sold for $20. You can’t expect a lot of expert engineering with $2, and for them to support that device with patches and certify their device as secure, if it takes an additional six months of lab time and $150k. Some of these devices will be in operation for ten years, where the normal IT device might last three-to-five years before it’s replaced.  The next party to look at is the consumer and end-user. This might also include the company that buys and uses IoT devices. There’s a lot of focus in the press about all the things that enterprises and home users can do to protect themselves and make their device secure, like network segregation,  disabling UPnP/SSDP, changing device passwords and applying firmware updates. That’s all great, but most of the time consumers don’t have access to the OS or even have the ability to tell if the device is secure- if it sits on the shelf and blinks, does that make it secure?  According to the common practices of the Internet, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are the party responsible for traffic coming from their network. This includes IoT devices that have “gone rogue”. Some of the IoT attacks are a hygiene issue and ISPs are in position to be impacted by the attacks.   However, right now ISPs respond to complaints on a very slow, reactive model. They don’t have enough staff resources to clean up all the devices and the information flow isn’t timely enough to block attacks as they happen. In order to get this clean-up scaled to meet demand, ISPs need real-time automated reporting of abuse and to feed that into a semi-automated response system to block the attack at the subscriber’s level Lastly, the organisations that receive these attacks. Both established and small-to-medium (SMBs) organisations have a role to play in identifying devices that are attacking them and closing the feedback loop to manufacturers, consumers and ISPs.

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Protecting Your Intellectual Property in the Internet of Things 

Protecting Your Intellectual Property in the Internet of Things  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Protecting your IP in the Internet of Things is likely to be both more complicated and lead to more patent infringement lawsuits than ever before.
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Colliding patents in an Internet of Things world:  Filing a patent in such a lucrative industry can be quite valuable. Unfortunately, protecting your IP in the IoT is likely to be both more complicated and lead to more patent infringement lawsuits than ever before. Why? Because in order to successfully operate with other systems (interoperate), IoT devices from different manufacturers will have to be able to work together – which means there’s likely to be a great deal of overlapping utility patents. And with the number of sub-components each single device contains, “even a small IoT system could have thousands of active patents covering a myriad of features,” says Finnegan partner Kenie Ho and associate Mandy J. Song, Ph.D.   Internet of Things communication infrastructure
Making things even more complex is that a number of different industries are competing to provide the same IoT communication infrastructure. For example:  Car companies want to install home networks that allow for silent, wireless overnight software updates.
Alphabet’s Nest division offers smart home devices that talk to each other.   Power companies want homes connected to smart grids, with some offering home surveillance networks as an enticement.  The concern with all of this is that once a communication infrastructure becomes ubiquitous, it stands a stronger chance of becoming the backbone of subsequent IoT systems. For a company in the IoT industry — especially now, when so much is in flux — this means that any other company (even one in a completely different industry) could be infringing your patent. Or on the other hand, you could be infringing another company’s IP without knowing it. Therefore, in the interconnected world of IoT, a strong and thoughtful strategy for IP management is imperative.
A strong patent portfolio is the best defense:   A solid patent portfolio offers three important benefits:
Income – Patents you own that others need to license can provide lucrative income streams.
Partnership – If you have a valuable patent, it can provide leverage when you’re working out cross-licensing agreements with competitors.
Litigation deterrent – A strong IP portfolio will serve as a deterrent against patent trolls and others seeking IP infringement lawsuits.
Patent as early as possible:   The IoT industry is exploding, so if you want to stay ahead of the game, you need to patent your innovations as quickly as possible. When writing your patent application, experts say you should consider claiming:
Broad scope – A broad patent application can provide greater opportunities to sue for patent infringement down the road. However, it’s important to know that the USPTO may narrow your claim’s breadth during its examination due to Alice and some other recent Supreme Court decisions.
Diversity – When an invention is presented in multiple claim formats, with different terminology and in different arrangements, it’s less likely to leave any unintended loopholes in IP protection (due to an overly narrow description of the invention).
Settings – Citing the ways in which the invention can be used in multiple scenarios widens the circumstances in which you may be able to prove IP infringement in the future.

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FDA clears new robotically-assisted surgical device for adult patients

FDA clears new robotically-assisted surgical device for adult patients | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared the Senhance System, a new robotically-assisted surgical device (RASD) that can help facilitate minimally invasive surgery.
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“Minimally invasive surgery helps reduce pain, scarring and recovery time after surgery,” said Binita Ashar, M.D., director of the Division of Surgical Devices in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “RASD technology is a specialized innovation in minimally invasive surgery designed to enhance the surgeon’s access and visualization within confined operative sites.”   RASD, sometimes referred to as robotic surgery, is one type of computer-assisted surgical system. RASD enables the surgeon to use computer and software technology to control and move surgical instruments through one or more tiny incisions in the patient’s body (laparoscopic surgery) in a variety of surgical procedures or operations. The benefits of RASD technology may include its ability to facilitate minimally invasive surgery and assist with complex tasks in confined areas of the body. The device is not actually a robot because it cannot perform surgery without direct human control.  The design of the Senhance System allows surgeons to sit at a console unit or cockpit that provides a 3-D high-definition view of the surgical field and allows them to control three separate robotic arms remotely. The end of each arm is equipped with surgical instruments that are based on traditional laparoscopic instrument designs. The system also includes unique technological characteristics: force feedback, which helps the surgeon “feel” the stiffness of tissue being grasped by the robotic arm; eye-tracking, which helps control movement of the surgical tools and laparoscopic-type controls similar to traditional surgical equipment.  The Senhance System is intended to assist in the accurate control of laparoscopic instruments for visualization and endoscopic manipulation of tissue including grasping, cutting, blunt and sharp dissection, approximation, ligation, electrocautery, suturing, mobilization and retraction in laparoscopic colorectal surgery and laparoscopic gynecological surgery. The system is for use on adult patients by trained physicians in an operating room environment.

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What’s Next for the IoT?

What’s Next for the IoT? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
What’s Next for the IoT? Industrial IoT now dominates the market, but confusion is still rampant in all sectors.
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The big bucks are in Industrial IoT, though. That market has attracted AT&T, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Verizon Communications, and hundreds of startups. Some of those startups, such as C3 IoT and Uptake Technologies, have achieved “unicorn” status and attracted significant investments. The Chicago-based Uptake is a shining example of the industry transition from platform-as-a-service business models to software-as-a-service.  Many of the savvier startups are adding artificial intelligence and machine learning to their technology portfolios, complementing their IoT focus.   Ron Lowman, strategic marketing manager for IoT at Synopsys, points to the development of the Industrial IoT, machine learning, audio technology, and voice recognition/processing as important trends in IoT. He notes that connectivity is the big trend in the IoT market and in IoT technology.  “Industrial IoT has been a big conversation piece,” he says. “It’s really moving out of what was smart home last year. There’s now a lot more smart farming, smart industry, smart streetlights – things that have been around, but now they’re becoming a reality. We’re starting to see expanded installation of those with respect to chip design. Obviously, one of the big things is machine learning. This is a pretty wide topic. There are all kinds of things, from chatbots to object identification, and so on. Voice recognition is part of that in some form or fashion. And the last thing that is changing is maturity — maturation of standards. Of course, some consolidation we’ve seen over the past couple of years has provided a little bit better path for customers to focus on. People were going in a hundred different directions, at 100 miles per hour, so now that’s starting to be more of a complete picture.”  Standards and issues  Complete does not mean perfect, though. The Industrial IoT platform markets are seeing “clashes” among information technology, operational technology, and IoT-focused providers, notes Emil Berthesen, a principal analyst at Machina Research/Gartner. “End-users are experiencing the challenge of moving from proof-of-concept and pilots to scaled implementations.”   Across many IoT markets, particularly those with battery-powered edge devices, power remains an issue. Energy harvesting is improving, but progress has been slow. The same is true for battery technology. This has spurred growing interest in low-power wide-area networks and narrowband IoT technology because connectivity—especially wireless connectivity—is so central to the Internet of Things, Berthesen says.

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The 10 skills you need to thrive in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

The 10 skills you need to thrive in the Fourth Industrial Revolution | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
These are the top 10 skills you will need in the workplace in 2020.
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Five years from now, over one-third of skills (35%) that are considered important in today’s workforce will have changed.

By 2020, the Fourth Industrial Revolution will have brought us advanced robotics and autonomous transport, artificial intelligence and machine learning, advanced materials, biotechnology and genomics.  These developments will transform the way we live, and the way we work. Some jobs will disappear, others will grow and jobs that don’t even exist today will become commonplace. What is certain is that the future workforce will need to align its skillset to keep pace.  A new Forum report, The Future of Jobs, looks at the employment, skills and workforce strategy for the future.  The report asked chief human resources and strategy officers from leading global employers what the current shifts mean, specifically for employment, skills and recruitment across industries and geographies.

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The adversarial relationship of the DRAM user and producer continues 

The adversarial relationship of the DRAM user and producer continues  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Over the full market cycle, each side presses its advantage as much as possible.
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Just one year ago, DRAM buyers took full advantage of the oversupply (excess capacity) portion of the cycle and negotiated the lowest price possible with the DRAM manufacturers, regardless of whether the DRAM suppliers lost money on the deal. Now, with tight capacity in the market, DRAM suppliers are getting their “payback” and charging whatever the market will bear, regardless of whether the price increases hurt the users’ electronic system sales or causes it to lose money.  The three remaining major DRAM suppliers—Samsung, SK Hynix, and Micron—are each currently enjoying record profits from their memory sales.  For example, Micron reported net income of $1.65 billion on $5.57 billion in sales—a 30% profit margin—in its fiscal 3Q17 (ending in May 2017).  In contrast, the company lost $170 million in its fiscal 4Q16 (ending August 2016).  A similar turnaround has occurred at SK Hynix.  In 2Q17, SK Hynix had a net profit of $2.19 billion on sales of $5.94 billion—a 37% profit margin.  In contrast, SK Hynix had a net profit of only $246 million on $3.39 billion in sales one year ago in 2Q16.

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