Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Treadmill Washes Your Clothes

Treadmill Washes Your Clothes | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
This washing machine/treadmill mashup is an entry for the 2014 Electrolux Design Lab competition. Continue reading →
Richard Platt's insight:

Two things I love to do at the same time - Laundry and Running in place - Not !

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Harvard's Michael Porter and PTC CEO Summarize the Impact of IoT on Companies

Harvard's Michael Porter and PTC CEO Summarize the Impact of IoT on Companies | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is changing more than products, it's changing companies' operations and organizational structure too.

Via ManufacturingStories
Richard Platt's insight:

5 Videos explain the different elements that Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter and PTC CEO Jim Heppelmann see with regards to the IoT and it's impact on firms.  Important stuff to comprehend.  For instance: 

Making the Transition: “For many companies, the change from the traditional manufacturing model, to this new world of smart, connected products is a daunting organizational transformation,” says Heppelmann in his fifth video.  Yet there are techniques companies can use to make the transition, he advises. One is to form a cross functional steering committee that oversees a smart, connected products program, or initiative. Another is to form a center of excellence by drafting talent from different parts of the business to develop best practices for the broader organization. Another is the formation of a new business unit so that other business units that can then retain a strong focus on the traditional aspects of the business.

“These are all transition techniques, probably all temporary techniques, on the path to some new normal that could be years down the road by the time a company really masters where they’re going,” concludes Heppelmann 


Definitely review all of the videos

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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 21, 2015 2:04 PM

#IoT #Connected #Devices #SmartDevices

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The Inside Story of How Oculus Cracked the Impossible Design of VR

The Inside Story of How Oculus Cracked the Impossible Design of VR | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
After nearly four years of work, Oculus is about to share its long-gestating dream with the world.
Richard Platt's insight:

A great story on the significant challenges of designing a viable and workable product for the marketplace - lots of challenges to overcome and it is an iterative process.  The DK2, (Developer Kit 2) not only added new capabilities—most significantly, the ability to have its position tracked in space and a display technology that kept images clear even when users moved their heads quickly—but, with its rounded corners and smaller, less forbidding eyebox, it was immediately friendlier than its predecessor. “We don’t want the robot mask on your face,” says Nirav Patel, an Oculus engineer who helped design the motion-sensing brain of the Rift. “As we went from DK1 to DK2, we had in mind that we needed to overcorrect for that.”  But the DK2 was by no means perfect. Its ski-goggle-style head strap was soft, but to keep the front-heavy headset stable it had to be adjusted so tightly that long-term comfort was a concern. And cramming in all the capabilities Oculus wanted the consumer Rift to have meant bundling three more cables together, resulting in what Patel calls a “preposterous umbilical cord.” While DK2 did what it needed to do—provide developers a platform on which they could start building games and experiences—it wasn’t a product. Not by a long shot.  Not only did the lack of side anchors make the headset shift from side to side, but you felt like Bane during a visit to the optometrist. So Bristol and Patel and their teams made design prototypes. A lot of them. (At one point, while showing me a group of 10 or so prototypes, Bristol allowed that the assortment represents “probably a fiftieth” of their exploration.) And while all those prototypes solved problems, they invariably created others. Take the one that replaced straps with hard plastic wings that gripped the sides of your head. Upside: You could slide it on from the front. Downside: Not only did the lack of side anchors make the headset shift from side to side, but you felt like Bane during a visit to the optometrist.  “You’re always adding into the equation what people are actually going to be comfortable wearing and what looks appropriate,”   As the prototypes came and went, the team realized that ergonomics for a VR headset are about more than just stability. You could custom-fit a 3-D-printed headset, but that was for naught if it didn’t lead to a good time in VR. “We’d build stuff,” Patel says, “and we couldn’t actually prove out if it was ergonomically good until we actually went into VR. You have to see it in-experience to know if it solves the problems that you need it to.”  Slowly, the many tributaries they’d pursued dried up, returning them to a single course of design elements. The side straps became spring-loaded cantilevers, which would let you adjust the fit as you liked but still take the headset off (and put it back on) like a baseball cap, with no further readjustments. The integrated on-ear headphones swivel forward and back to fit onto anyone’s ears—then swing up and out of the way with a soft, satisfying click. “The right answer has to be exposed to the consumer,” Bristol says. “You’re not hiding it in plastic or decoration—there’s a raw honesty of technology and solutions.” - 

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Breaking Down the Apple iOS Back Door Fight

"We can not use a law from 1789 to regulate a digital space in such an overreaching way."
Richard Platt's insight:

What Is The Government Actually Asking Apple To Do?

In the original letter, Apple explains that the FBI wants the option to install an operating system—one that does not yet exist and that Apple would have to build—on one iPhone related to the San Bernardino terrorism. The operating system would break the encryption used to keep phone data private. Encryption is almost like giving the computer a secret language to speak, a cipher like spies use, and only people with the key to that cipher can decipher the information. In this case, they’re talking about the passcode to the iPhone. As of right now, the only way to input a passcode into a phone is manually—you have to put your fingers on it and type numbers or, if your phone is a 5s or later, put your fingerprint on it.

One of the elements of the cracked operating system the FBI is asking for is the ability to input passcodes electronically. That means they could essentially plug an iPhone into some software or hardware that would try thousands or millions of passcode options at the speed of a modern computer (remember that your iPhone is a bigger, badder computer than the one that first got astronauts to the moon, and that in comparison to other modern computers, it is slow). It would also strip the bricked phone feature—currently, if someone enters a passcode incorrectly on a phone ten times, that phone becomes useless. You cannot get the data off that phone, and that is as it should be.  The government says they would use it only for this one phone, but that line of reasoning represents a fundamental misunderstanding of the way the digital world works. Let’s talk about it in the sense of music. If you record a band on one of those old handheld tape recorders, nothing digital about it, and then you destroy the tape, that’s it. That was the only tape. There are no more tapes. You cannot listen to that recording again. The tape cannot be in more than one place at once, either—even if you hadn’t destroyed the tape, your friend cannot also listen to it in a separate room, or you couldn’t listen to it with another device that does not have the tape actively inside it. That’s the way the analog world works.

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How Google's SkyBender drones will deliver Internet access to remote areas

How Google's SkyBender drones will deliver Internet access to remote areas | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The company is quietly conducting tests of the technology, which could potentially transmit large amounts of data at speeds up to 40 times faster than currently 4G LTE networks, at a vast site in New Mexico developed for private spaceflight.
Richard Platt's insight:

Google is quietly testing whether solar-powered drones can deliver high-speed Internet service from the air at a much faster rate than traditional cell towers.  The project, codenamed SkyBender, uses transceivers that can send and receive signals using high-frequency millimeter wave radio transmissions, which can potentially transmit gigabits of data per second, up to 40 times faster than 4G LTE cell networks, the current mobile standard. The high-frequency transmissions have often been proposed as part of a faster 5G standard.  Because millimeter wave technology uses higher frequencies, it has the potential to carry more data and operate in a less crowded part of the radio wave spectrum, making data-hungry services, such as streaming video sites, available to a wider group of users.  

But there are some drawbacks to the technology behind SkyBender — high-frequency transmissions have a short wavelength, meaning they can’t travel as far and can be blocked by obstacles such as buildings, walls, and windows – and even rain and moisture in the air.  The market for lower frequencies that aren't already being used — so-called “beachfront property,” which can travel longer distances and through buildings — is often highly competitive. An auction held by the Federal Communications Commission last year netted $45 billion from wireless carriers.  “The huge advantage of millimeter wave is access to new spectrum because the existing cellphone spectrum is overcrowded. It’s packed and there’s nowhere else to go,” Jacques Rudell, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle, told the Guardian.  But in order to get millimeter waves to work from a drone, Professor Rudell says, Google must experiment with using highly-focused transmissions from what’s known as a phased array. That’s a difficult task that also burns a lot of power, Rudell told the paper.

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TDI Group's curator insight, February 2, 6:31 AM

aggiungere la vostra comprensione ...

Jerry Mills's curator insight, February 6, 8:20 AM

5G is slowly coming but it is coming

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Your Algorithmic Self Meets Super-Intelligent AI

Your Algorithmic Self Meets Super-Intelligent AI | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

As humanity debates the threats and opportunities of advanced artificial intelligence, we are simultaneously enabling that technology through the increasing use of personalization that is understanding and anticipating our needs through sophisticated machine learning solutions.


Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

As humanity debates the threats and opportunities of advanced artificial intelligence, we are simultaneously enabling that technology through the increasing use of personalization that is understanding and anticipating our needs through sophisticated machine learning solutions.

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Ante Lauc's curator insight, January 13, 7:18 AM

GAU should overcome iot with Internet of people ( iop) ..

Low  level of motivation, knowledge, and teambuilding are constraints for iot and development...

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Artificial Intelligence and IOT are inseparable

Artificial Intelligence and IOT are inseparable | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

We’ve been thinking about the Internet of Things all wrong.

    • Big data analytics for IOT software revenues will experience strong growth, reaching $81 billion by 2022 says Strategy Analytics
    • Smart Cities will use 1.6 billion connected things in 2016 says Gartner 
    • By 2025 IOT will be a $1.6 trillion opportunity in Healthcare alone says McKinsey
    • 50 billion+ connected devices will exist by 2020 says Cisco
    • Data captured by IOT connected devices will top 1.6 zettabytes in 2020 says ABI Research
    • There are 10 major factions fighting to become the interoperating standard for IOT


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TDI Group's curator insight, February 2, 6:40 AM

aggiungere la vostra comprensione ...

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Vehicle-to-vehicle tech aims to prevent accidents

Vehicle-to-vehicle tech aims to prevent accidents | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The federal government is proposing new technology regulations for the car market: vehicle-to-vehicle technology. The new system would allow cars to "talk" to each other on the road. Kris Van Cleave reports regulators hope this will help prevent accidents.
Richard Platt's insight:

V2V tech gets the thumbs up from the Federal govt, still there are many issues to be worked out before it gets implemented effectively where it is able to save lives.

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The 12 most innovative things we saw at CES 2016

The 12 most innovative things we saw at CES 2016 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
This year's Consumer Electronics Show isn't officially over until the end of the day on Saturday but all of the big announcements are behind us at this point. We're going to level with you: it wasn't a terribly exciting show overall this year.
Richard Platt's insight:

My take on this list from BGR (Boy Genius Report) that I thought was worth noting that showed significant interest / benefit for the mass market (meaning these company's products are addressing a need more effectively in the market than their competitors):

Under Armour: With HTC as its hardware partner, Under Armour unveiled a slew of connected fitness devices in Las Vegas on Tuesday. The star of the show is a trio of devices that make up the Under Armour Healthbox, which is aimed at providing athletes with a more comprehensive experience than they would get from a simple fitness band like a FitBit.  The relatively young company is among the biggest brands in sports, rivaling mainstays like Nike, Reebok and Adidas in many ways thanks to aggressive marketing and innovative products. It’s no accident that Under Armour has reported revenue growth of 20% or better in the past 20 quarters.  

The set costs $400 for all three devices, or the UA Band and UA Scale can be purchased separately for $180 each. The UA Heart Rate strap will cost $80 when purchased separately.  UA’s new Bluetooth headphones also cost $180, and the second version with built-in heart rate monitoring will cost $250 when they launch this spring. Finally, the SpeedForm Gemini 2 connected sneakers will be released in select sporting goods stores on February 29th for $150. - Price seems high but if you're into a better level of fitness monitoring then this product lineup looks to show better performance than competitive offerings.

Portal Router:  Portal says its upcoming new Wi-Fi router is “the biggest breakthrough in WiFi in 15 years,” and if it can deliver on its promises, it might be right. The company says its router can utilize 250% more of the 5GHz spectrum than other routers and use smart new technology to scan the area for interference. Then, it will automatically retune itself to avoid anything that might slow down your data speeds. - there are actual needs that Portal is addressing here (spectrum density issues, better connectivity - has 9 antennas, and numerous others), there are a couple other additions that I could see that would also be important for the evolution of routers, but this is definitely a step in the right direction.

Harman In-Car Monitoring System:  

Harman has invented a new system with the potential to save thousands of lives each year. The world’s first pupil-based in-car monitoring system can track a driver’s eyes to not just provide a warning if he or she is falling asleep, but also ensure the driver’s attention stays on the road. The system monitors pupil dilation to determine if a driver might be distracted, and the hardware component is little more than a simple camera so it can feasibly be installed in any car. - Given that sleep deprived drivers can and do impact responsiveness on the road, this could be a real move forward in driver safety

DAQRI Smart Helmet:   The glasses-cum-hardhat has been co-developed with augmented reality company Daqri using Intel’s latest processor and camera technology. It has taken concepts – like those of Microsoft’s Hololens – and produced a real product.  Unlike devices such as HoloLens or Google Glass, which have been marketed as consumer devices, the Daqri Smart Helmet is designed with industrial use in mind. It will allow the wearer to effectively peer into the workings of objects using real-time overlay of information, such as wiring diagrams, schematics and problem areas that need fixing.  Intel has spent years trying to move beyond just making and being known for the chips that run computers. It launched its RealSense system at CES in 2014 – a follow up to the company’s Perceptual Computing platform.  Now RealSense has been combined with a 360-degree sensor array, Intel’s latest Core m7 processor and Daqri’s computer vision and tracking system to produce what it claims to be the “most powerful AR wearable device” available. The Smart Helmet has been tested by a range of Fortune 100 companies across aerospace, construction, oil and gas industries, and will be available for purchase in the first quarter of this year. - The Use Case development with multiple companies illustrates that there are real industrial applications for this type of product technology, but like anything new will require more iterations before it will take off

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Alvaro de Pablo Martinez de Ubago's curator insight, January 9, 7:53 AM

¿Cuál de estas cosas van a afectar a la forma de educar en España en los próximos cinco años?

Allan Niass's curator insight, January 12, 2:09 PM

Beaut Toys for Big Boys and Gals.

 

www.newstoworld.com's curator insight, January 17, 4:35 AM

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How Israel is Becoming a Global Leader in the Internet of Things

How Israel is Becoming a Global Leader in the Internet of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
By now, nearly everyone has been exposed to the Internet of Things (IoT) in
one way or another, whether through a Fitbit bracelet, a Nest smart
thermostat, or now even the Apple watch.  But despite all of the hype, IoT
is still something of an enigma, both to laymen and investors alike, and
from Silicon Valley all the way to Tel Aviv.  Moreover, for a number of
reasons including a history of Israeli failures in the consumer and
hardware spaces, there is a general lack of belief that Israel can be a
leader in IoT.  

However, at Innovation Endeavors in recent months, we have seen a growing
amount of impressive IoT activity coming out of Israel.  This intrigued us
and led us to do a three-month deep dive into the space. The goal was to
both demystify the existing understanding of IoT and identify the trends,
sectors, and technologies that can serve as significant opportunities for
Israeli entrepreneurs in this space.
Richard Platt's insight:

Key findings of the landscape

1) IoT is booming with activity in Israel.  According to the landscape research, there are around 330 Israeli IoT companies.  As Israel is home to approximately 6,100 active startups in total, IoT represents a surprisingly whopping 5% of the Israeli startup ecosystem!  These companies pertain to all verticals, stages, and levels of the stack, and address unique problems across many major markets.

2) Israeli IoT leverages Israel’s strengths in sectors like healthcare, life science, and cyber security.  Given Israel’s historical proficiencies, it is not surprising that most of the IoT activity in Israel plays to the country’s unique strengths in areas such as healthcare, science, and cyber security, in new and interesting ways.  For example, one Israeli company in the cyber security vertical is Argus Security, which is building a “firewall” for the connected car, defending your vehicle from being compromised by outside attackers, especially hackers that can take control of your car remotely!  If, on the other hand, you’re less worried about hackers and more worried about calories, Consumer Physics’ molecular pocket sensor allows you to measure the physical world around you, including food, medicine, plants, and more.  For instance, you can scan a piece of cheese and find out complete nutritional information like calories, protein, fat, etc. 

3) The Israeli IoT industry is still far from mature.  Regardless of sector, most companies on the landscape are stuck in the middle stages of their lifecycle, i.e. the R&D or initial revenues stages.  Moreover, nearly 80% of companies are focused around the applications category rather than other levels of the stack (such as IoT platforms or components).  This unbalanced distribution in terms of stage and level suggests a severe lack of infrastructure and maturity in this market wherein startups have not yet found their long-term product-market fit or verticalized their supply.  However, this also represents an opportunity for companies to capitalize on such “whitespaces” in the landscape, particularly around the platform level where the numbers indicate that it is still early in the lifecycle curve.

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Can We Depend on 3D Printing Technology at the Production Level?

Can We Depend on 3D Printing Technology at the Production Level? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
At the prototyping level, 3D printing technology works perfectly. However, building final products using the technology is still faced by barriers and obstacles. We cannot just stand still watching 3D printing projects with enthusiasm without serious considering of these barriers.
Richard Platt's insight:

Affordable 3D Printers Equals Low Quality:  During the last few years, many startups have been established to build affordable 3D printers. This includes dozens of Kickstarter projects which have been initiated to lower the price of 3D printers. Some projects are promising but there is another obstacle to address. Most of these low cost 3D printers produce low quality output or inaccurate model printing. Many designers are trying to address this issue and we can see 3D printers have already started to build with better output such as the Pirx One 3D printer, manufactured by a European company based in Poland.  3D Printing Technology Duration and Quantitative Production  One of the common issues that can be noticed in most of the 3D printers is the duration required to complete the 3D printing task. While 3D printing is one of the fastest rapid prototyping technologies, it is slow compared with the traditional quantity production methods. The reason for the long printing time is that 3D printing heads builds the 3D model layer by layer as the filament is molded from the printer nozzle.  This barrier prevents the technology from competing with the existing industrial technologies especially for printing a large number of the model or product on a mass scale. Additionally, the cost of 3D printing one model stands as a barrier when working with a quantitative printing process. The cost of printing a limited number of models is very expensive and incomparable with the traditional production process.

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Patent shows Google plans a 'needle-free blood draw' system

Patent shows Google plans a 'needle-free blood draw' system | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The design (illustrated), filed with the USPTO in Virginia, describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel that contains a ‘micro-particle’ capable of puncturing the skin.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Richard Platt's insight:

Google has filed a patent for a 'needle-free blood draw' system that could be built into a wearable attached to someone's wrist, or a hand-held device. The filing describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel containing a 'micro-particle' capable of puncturing the skin and drawing a small drop of blood.  Google suggests the device could even replace glucose testers used by diabetics entirely. 

The patent said: 'Such an application might be used to draw a small amount of blood, for example, for a glucose test.'  It points out that the smallest possible puncture is desirable to cause as little pain as possible, but very small diameter needles can fail to pierce the skin or snap because they're not strong enough.  However, the use of a 'micro particle' propelled by gas at a high speed could solve this problem.  Google is already working on smart contact lenses and a cloud-connected sensors to help diabetics monitor their glucose levels.   A wearable or handheld device would therefor fit neatly into this initiative.  However, as with all patents, there is no guarantee the idea will ever become a reality.   Google is not the only tech giant taking steps into the healthcare market.  Health data has become the next big battleground among tech companies as a new generation of wearable gadgets allow users to measure heart rates, sleep patterns and exercise activities.

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Upshot2shop's curator insight, December 7, 2015 3:59 AM

Google has filed a patent for a 'needle-free blood draw' system that could be built into a wearable attached to someone's wrist, or a hand-held device. The filing describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel containing a 'micro-particle' capable of puncturing the skin and drawing a small drop of blood.  Google suggests the device could even replace glucose testers used by diabetics entirely. 

 

The patent said: 'Such an application might be used to draw a small amount of blood, for example, for a glucose test.'  It points out that the smallest possible puncture is desirable to cause as little pain as possible, but very small diameter needles can fail to pierce the skin or snap because they're not strong enough.  However, the use of a 'micro particle' propelled by gas at a high speed could solve this problem.  Google is already working on smart contact lenses and a cloud-connected sensors to help diabetics monitor their glucose levels.   A wearable or handheld device would therefor fit neatly into this initiative.  However, as with all patents, there is no guarantee the idea will ever become a reality.   Google is not the only tech giant taking steps into the healthcare market.  Health data has become the next big battleground among tech companies as a new generation of wearable gadgets allow users to measure heart rates, sleep patterns and exercise activities.

Ante Lauc's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:59 AM

I have diabetes almost 20 years and expect .....' Needle free blood draw' 

Internet of things will help me, together with ....to become without diabetes.

Darrin Shaw's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:40 AM

Google has filed a patent for a 'needle-free blood draw' system that could be built into a wearable attached to someone's wrist, or a hand-held device. The filing describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel containing a 'micro-particle' capable of puncturing the skin and drawing a small drop of blood.  Google suggests the device could even replace glucose testers used by diabetics entirely. 


 


The patent said: 'Such an application might be used to draw a small amount of blood, for example, for a glucose test.'  It points out that the smallest possible puncture is desirable to cause as little pain as possible, but very small diameter needles can fail to pierce the skin or snap because they're not strong enough.  However, the use of a 'micro particle' propelled by gas at a high speed could solve this problem.  Google is already working on smart contact lenses and a cloud-connected sensors to help diabetics monitor their glucose levels.   A wearable or handheld device would therefor fit neatly into this initiative.  However, as with all patents, there is no guarantee the idea will ever become a reality.   Google is not the only tech giant taking steps into the healthcare market.  Health data has become the next big battleground among tech companies as a new generation of wearable gadgets allow users to measure heart rates, sleep patterns and exercise activities.

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The Internet of Things: Architecture and Protocols

In this session, JP Vasseur, Chief Architect for the IoT Group at Cisco and Cisco Fellow, provides a short overview of the IoT architecture and its protocols.

Via Francisco Maroto
Richard Platt's insight:

Video session with JP Vasseur, Chief Architect for the IoT Group at Cisco and Cisco Fellow, provides a short overview of the IoT architecture and its protocols.

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Ante Lauc's curator insight, December 10, 2015 9:00 AM

Without understanding Autopoiesis in Architecture I doubt in success.

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Amazon Fire TV Review: How Good Is This New Streaming Media Player?

Amazon Fire TV Review: How Good Is This New Streaming Media Player? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Check out Consumer Reports' Amazon Fire TV review. This new streaming media player has 4K videos and the Alexa digital voice assistant. Should owners of the older model upgrade?
Richard Platt's insight:

Consumer Reports' Take:  If you're in the market for a streaming media player, the new Amazon Fire TV is worth considering. It's a top-performing player and it's less expensive than the new Apple TV or Roku 4. Compared to the previous model, it features some nice enhancements at no additional cost. It's an especially smart choice if you're an Amazon Prime subscriber and use the company's streaming video and music services.  But there's no compelling reason to upgrade unless you buy a smart TV with no 4K streaming (This means the Fire TV won't be able to support high dynamic range (HDR) content or 60-frames-per-second video. That's a bit strange considering that Amazon Prime is one of the only services currently offering HDR programs. Still, since most available 4K content is either 24 or 30 frames per second, that lack of support might not be an issue for you.); you're unhappy with the smart TV platform on your current set; and you're hungry for Amazon Prime content unavailable on your TV.

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Upshot2shop's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:09 AM

Consumer Reports' Take:  If you're in the market for a streaming media player, the new Amazon Fire TV is worth considering. It's a top-performing player and it's less expensive than the new Apple TV or Roku 4. Compared to the previous model, it features some nice enhancements at no additional cost. It's an especially smart choice if you're an Amazon Prime subscriber and use the company's streaming video and music services.  But there's no compelling reason to upgrade unless you buy a smart TV with no 4K streaming (This means the Fire TV won't be able to support high dynamic range (HDR) content or 60-frames-per-second video. That's a bit strange considering that Amazon Prime is one of the only services currently offering HDR programs. Still, since most available 4K content is either 24 or 30 frames per second, that lack of support might not be an issue for you.); you're unhappy with the smart TV platform on your current set; and you're hungry for Amazon Prime content unavailable on your TV.

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Financial Institutions Turn to the Internet of Things to Stay Competitive

Financial Institutions Turn to the Internet of Things to Stay Competitive | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Connected devices, drones and sensors helping financial service companies
Richard Platt's insight:

Whether it’s tracking driving habits for the purpose of offering insurance discounts, using biometric data to confirm an ATM user’s identity, using sensors to determine the condition of loan collateral, or remotely disabling a car that is slated for repossession, the financial services IoT is ushering in an era in which “smart” things can seamlessly collect, share and analyze real-time data, as explored in a new eMarketer report, “The Internet of Financial Things: What Banking and Insurance Industry Marketers Need to Know Now.”  An April 2015 survey of global executives across a variety of different industries conducted by Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) found that respondents in banking and financial services predicted that average IoT per-company spending for their sector would grow to $153.5 million by 2018, up nearly 31% from $117.4 million in 2015. Respondents in the insurance industry expected their average per-company budgets to rise about 32% between 2015 and 2018, from $77.7 million to $102.9 million.

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David Sussman's curator insight, April 3, 8:17 AM

Whether it’s tracking driving habits for the purpose of offering insurance discounts, using biometric data to confirm an ATM user’s identity, using sensors to determine the condition of loan collateral, or remotely disabling a car that is slated for repossession, the financial services IoT is ushering in an era in which “smart” things can seamlessly collect, share and analyze real-time data, as explored in a new eMarketer report, “The Internet of Financial Things: What Banking and Insurance Industry Marketers Need to Know Now.”  An April 2015 survey of global executives across a variety of different industries conducted by Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) found that respondents in banking and financial services predicted that average IoT per-company spending for their sector would grow to $153.5 million by 2018, up nearly 31% from $117.4 million in 2015. Respondents in the insurance industry expected their average per-company budgets to rise about 32% between 2015 and 2018, from $77.7 million to $102.9 million.

Michael Hallin's curator insight, May 27, 2:38 AM
Industry 4.0 og Internet of Things... hvordan vil IoT påvirke jeres virksomhed?
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Boeing's self-cleaning lavatory zaps germs with UV light

Boeing's self-cleaning lavatory zaps germs with UV light | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It could be the cleanest bathroom in the sky, and you'd hardly have to touch a thing
Richard Platt's insight:

For those who are worried about the cleanliness of airplane bathrooms (and who isn't?), Boeing is working on a solution. This week it unveiled a prototype of a self-cleaning lavatory that zaps germs with UV light.  The company says it uses far ultraviolet light to kill 99.9 percent of germs on the toilet, sink and other surfaces where bacteria can lurk. It claims three seconds of exposure to far UV light is enough to disinfect all the surfaces in the room.  Far UV is not the same wavelength as the potentially damaging UVA or UVB light that you might find in a tanning bed, for instance.   "In the prototype, we position the lights throughout the lavatory so that it floods the touch surfaces like the toilet seat, sink and countertops with the UV light once a person exits the lavatory. This sanitizing even helps eliminate odors."

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Melanie Ebanks's curator insight, May 24, 10:15 AM

this could be a game changer.  please be real. 

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IoT Raises New Legal Challenges For Business

IoT Raises New Legal Challenges For Business | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Privacy, security, and data ownership issues surrounding Internet of Things devices are creating a host of new legal questions and problems. Here's what's happening now, and what you need to know.

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For example, VTech is being sued in Illinois for fraud and deceptive business practices, breach of contract, breach of good faith and fair dealing, breach of implied warranty, and negligence. Its product was allegedly vulnerable to a SQL injection attack that allowed hackers to steal the personal information of 2.8 million parents and children.

New classes of devices, including wearables and drones, are collecting information that may not have been available previously, or may not have been cost-effective to procure, particularly in a persistent way, in the past.  "Consumers are going to be providing information to products in a new way that companies have not thought of. Those companies may not have thought about privacy the same way an Internet-facing line of business in the same organization would," said Nicholas Merker, co-chair of the data security and privacy practice at law firm Ice Miller, in an interview. "If you've never captured information in your product and you want to start now, you're going to have some of the problems folks had in the Internet era when they started doing the same thing."

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Sony Announces 'Multifunctional Light' For The Smart Home

Sony Announces 'Multifunctional Light' For The Smart Home | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With CES no longer about new smartphone launches, a number of tech companies and consumer electronics vendors from across the world took the opportunity to
Richard Platt's insight:

Sony’s latest offering is an overhead light fixture, rather unimaginatively named the Multifunctional Light. It is a connected device that’s capable of communicating with other gadgets in a smart home, like smart air conditioners, thermostats and televisions, Sony claims that the device can also double up as an intercom system. The light fixture is apparently also able to read data from smart thermostats, and comes with a motion sensor and a microSD card slot. It is said to use its motion sensor to detect human presence in the room and accordingly, turn the TV on and off via infrared, but the utility of the microSD card slot has not yet been detailed by the Japanese consumer technology giant. Either way. all that sounds fairly interesting especially if you’re into the 21st century smart home trend that is tipped to become a multi-billion dollar industry over the next few years.

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Brett.Ashley.Crawford's curator insight, January 19, 1:45 PM

Public spaces could afford both artistic interventions using smart technologies AND organizations could save $. The future will be interesting.

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Alphabet introduces Verily, a new name for its Google Life Sciences division

Alphabet introduces Verily, a new name for its Google Life Sciences division | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

In a video introduction, Google has announced a new name for its Life Sciences division, recently placed under the Alphabet umbrella. The division will now be an independent entity known as "Verily"...


Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

Verily are now going to be the folks who are developing the smart contact lense technology for diabetics and likely other applications

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When Technology is Commoditized, Technology Must Become a Service

When Technology is Commoditized, Technology Must Become a Service | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

When Technology is Commoditized, Technology Must Become a Service

By Erik Flowers | January 11, 2016
The notion of great service has been around since the first caveperson offered to pick you up on their own dinosaur and take you somewhere in exchange for a sabertooth tusk, rather than you having to own a dinosaur yourself.


Via Fred Zimny, massimo facchinetti
Richard Platt's insight:

Designing for service is not new, and people who are exceedingly adept at designing for fantastic services aren’t new either. Entire industries are built upon service experience. The question is, why does there seem to be an explosion of interest service design as a field now, when great service is nothing new? New conferences are popping up by major organizers; Adaptive Path is on its 3rd service experience conference, Service Experience Chicago just had it’s 2nd year, and the O’Reilly Design Conference is new this year with only one speaker showcasing service design. If you look for books on service design, there are a few recent publications that are relevant to the landscape today, but these are very recent and just starting to tackle this idea of integrating service design into what we do outside of service industries.  It’s not hard to find examples of great service from long before service design was a discipline or something that had a proper name. Looking at the 20th century, many industries strived to deliver customer experiences that were well planned and filled with deliberate moments of delight; early commercial air travel, ocean cruises, full service resort hotels, fine dining, spas. Or, look at an elaborate and well planned wedding that is a choreographed event – people have long had the mind, knowhow, and ability to create these top rate “end-to-end” experience.

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Tailor invests $100,000 USD in 3D personal clothing experience

A Hong Kong tailor has spent more than $100,000 USD creating the ultimate personal clothing service, by pairing bespoke tailoring with technology. Joel Flynn reports.
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The future of custom tailoring a suit just went high tech

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How L’Oreal Built a UV-Measuring Temporary Tattoo

How L’Oreal Built a UV-Measuring Temporary Tattoo | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A truly wearable wearable.
Richard Platt's insight:

The beauty company has its own tech incubator, run by L’Oreal tech guru Guive Balooch. His team partnered with sensor-maker MC10 and design firm PCH to create a wearable called the My UV Patch. It attaches directly to your skin and measures UV exposure, relaying the information back to an app. You access the app by scanning the sticker (using NFC or your phone’s camera), which you obviously want to put somewhere the sun will indeed shine. The app gives you information about your UV exposure, using a pattern of blocks of color made of photosensitive dyes that measure your baseline skin tone and change colors when you’re out in the sun, depending on its strength.  You apply it like any other sticker, except this one hangs around a little longer—three to five days, usually. A few activity trackers and even more specific wearables measure UV to tell people whether they’re getting too much or too little sunlight, but not a lot of people are going to wear a Fitbit for UV health. A temporary sticker? Maybe. - as an innovator I always seek to start with and address a real need. While I can see that some people would be interested in measuring their UV exposure, I am unsure that the vast majority of people who do sunbathe, use tanning beds,  etc...are going to flock to this proposed solution.  But it is only my opinion.

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Reality check: Your computer is most likely too weak to run VR headsets

Reality check: Your computer is most likely too weak to run VR headsets | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Just 13 million PCs worldwide this year will have the graphics processing power necessary to render VR images properly, Nvidia warns.
Richard Platt's insight:

Just 13 million PCs worldwide this year will have the graphics processing power necessary to render VR images properly, Nvidia warns.  That is less than 1%  of the 1.43 billion computers expected to be in use this year, according to research firm Gartner data cited by Bloomberg.  "From 3D gaming to product design, to cinematic experiences and beyond,virtual reality promises to change the way we experience everyday things," Nvidia said in an emailed statement. "Delivering VR is a complex challenge, especially since immersive VR requires seven times the graphics processing power compared to traditional 3D applications and games."

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Scientists create world's first biologically powered computer chip

Scientists create world's first biologically powered computer chip | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

The dream of melding biological and man-made machinery is now a little more real with the announcement that Columbia Engineering researchers have successfully harnessed a chemical energy-producing biological process to power a solid state CMOS...

Richard Platt's insight:

According to study lead professor Ken Shepard, this is the world's first successful effort to isolate a biological process and use it to power an integrated circuit, much like the ones we use in phones and computers.  The researchers developed the system by using an artificially created lipid bilayer membrane containing naturally occurring ion pumps, which are powered by the biological world's "energy currency molecule," ATP (adenosine triphosphate). ATP is the coenzyme that transfers chemical energy between living cells. It is an end product of processes such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and it powers the mechanical work of living systems such as cell division and muscle contraction.   The scientists connected the lipid membrane to a conventional solid-state complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit, and the ion pumps powered the circuit.  "Ion pumps basically act very similarly to transistors," Shepard tells Gizmag. "The one we used is the same kind of pump that is used to maintain the resting potential in neurons. The pump produces an actual potential across an artificial lipid membrane. We packaged that with the IC and we used the energy across that membrane due to those pumped ions to power the integrated circuit."

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Vagabond Lifestyles's curator insight, January 3, 9:06 AM

Bio Chem Machines Explained

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Schneider Electric Brings IoT to Agriculture with Network of 4,000 Weather Stations

Schneider Electric Brings IoT to Agriculture with Network of 4,000 Weather Stations | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New Platform Creates First Comprehensive Rural Weather Record, Helping the Agriculture Industry Increase Effienciency and Sustainability. Schneider Electric, the global specialist in energy management and automation, today announced it is connecting more than 4,000 disparate rural area Weather Stations to provide a more holistic view of rural weather patterns across the US. Leveraging its big ...

Via IoT Business News
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The IoT expanding into agriculture via weather stations

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6 Tech Predictions To Have A Major Impact In 2016

6 Tech Predictions To Have A Major Impact In 2016 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
6 Tech Predictions To Have A Major Impact The technology industry moves at a relentless pace, making it both exhilarating and unforgiving.
Richard Platt's insight:
1. The death of the password is rapidly approaching -  Developers need to evaluate security solutions that are able to apply contextual identity, adaptive risk and multi-factor authentication at authentication plus at any point throughout a session. This kind of continuous security approach will be embraced in the marketplace and become the new standard, because it ensures authenticity of users, devices, things and services at all times and can mitigate risk whenever an anomaly is detected, even during existing sessions.  2. Chip to cloud (or device to cloud) security protection will be the new normal -  With most data chains now spanning the full spectrum of chip, device, network and cloud (plus all stages in between), many organizations are starting to realize a piecemeal approach to protection simply isn’t effective. This realization is spurring the adoption of more ‘chip to cloud’ security strategies, starting at the silicon level and running right through to cloud security. In this model, all objects with online capabilities are secured the moment they come online, meaning their identity is authenticated immediately. In doing so, it eliminates any window hackers have to hijack the identity of unsecured objects, thus compromising the entire data chain via a single entry point.   3. New technologies and standards that enable consumer privacy and security will become a competitive differentiator  -  They’re thinking of how to build delegation and consent capabilities fast enough to satisfy their customers, the business and the ever changing regulatory landscape. And they know they must do all of this with an architecture that scales to support millions of consumers and employees that can manage their own permissions.  User Managed Access (UMA) makes this all possible. UMA is now becoming available and can deliver this kind of experience. Those who embrace it early will be able to build a far stronger relationship with customers built on trust and mutual benefit.  4. The evolving Internet of Things will change the way we interact with the world around us - This is about to change. As technology evolves and contextual big data becomes more meaningful, businesses and governments will be able to harness the IoT to fundamentally change our daily lives. Central to this is the increasingly intertwined relationship between people, ‘things’ and apps, meaning things like medical devices, thermostats, security cameras and cars are able to receive a constant stream of personalized information straight to their device.  Key elements of the smart city concept are based on the ability to, for instance, use sensors connected to traffic lights to ease congestion, or use earthquake monitoring to shut down gas lines or other critical infrastructure that could be damaged in a quake. Securing systems such as these will be critical to public safety, and digital identity will be the critical security layer as smart cities get built out.  5. Tagging data at source will multiply the value of big data exponentially - In order to make sense of big data, it must be examined within the context it was collected. By tagging data at the point of collection with additional contextual information, the value that can be extracted from it across an organization is multiplied significantly. Key factors such as where and when the data was collected or who/what it was collected from are central to understanding data more effectively.   6. The fight to become the “Amazon of the IoT” will intensify - As the IoT’s vast potential becomes more apparent, we will start to see a growing number of organizations fighting to establish themselves as the go-to provider of IoT solutions, or the Amazon of the IoT. This will spur the rise of the IoT mega-platform; vast one-stop-shop Platform-as-a-Service solutions. The battle will likely play out across both the consumer and enterprise spaces and many of the usual suspects are already coming to the fore. Apple, Google and Intel are all vying for control of our homes, while Microsoft, IBM and Oracle are fighting over our businesses, 
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Ante Lauc's curator insight, December 10, 2015 9:02 AM

I like such expectation...

Eric Redegeld's curator insight, December 16, 2015 3:08 PM
1. The death of the password is rapidly approaching -  Developers need to evaluate security solutions that are able to apply contextual identity, adaptive risk and multi-factor authentication at authentication plus at any point throughout a session. This kind of continuous security approach will be embraced in the marketplace and become the new standard, because it ensures authenticity of users, devices, things and services at all times and can mitigate risk whenever an anomaly is detected, even during existing sessions.  2. Chip to cloud (or device to cloud) security protection will be the new normal -  With most data chains now spanning the full spectrum of chip, device, network and cloud (plus all stages in between), many organizations are starting to realize a piecemeal approach to protection simply isn’t effective. This realization is spurring the adoption of more ‘chip to cloud’ security strategies, starting at the silicon level and running right through to cloud security. In this model, all objects with online capabilities are secured the moment they come online, meaning their identity is authenticated immediately. In doing so, it eliminates any window hackers have to hijack the identity of unsecured objects, thus compromising the entire data chain via a single entry point.   3. New technologies and standards that enable consumer privacy and security will become a competitive differentiator  -  They’re thinking of how to build delegation and consent capabilities fast enough to satisfy their customers, the business and the ever changing regulatory landscape. And they know they must do all of this with an architecture that scales to support millions of consumers and employees that can manage their own permissions.  User Managed Access (UMA) makes this all possible. UMA is now becoming available and can deliver this kind of experience. Those who embrace it early will be able to build a far stronger relationship with customers built on trust and mutual benefit.  4. The evolving Internet of Things will change the way we interact with the world around us - This is about to change. As technology evolves and contextual big data becomes more meaningful, businesses and governments will be able to harness the IoT to fundamentally change our daily lives. Central to this is the increasingly intertwined relationship between people, ‘things’ and apps, meaning things like medical devices, thermostats, security cameras and cars are able to receive a constant stream of personalized information straight to their device.  Key elements of the smart city concept are based on the ability to, for instance, use sensors connected to traffic lights to ease congestion, or use earthquake monitoring to shut down gas lines or other critical infrastructure that could be damaged in a quake. Securing systems such as these will be critical to public safety, and digital identity will be the critical security layer as smart cities get built out.  5. Tagging data at source will multiply the value of big data exponentially - In order to make sense of big data, it must be examined within the context it was collected. By tagging data at the point of collection with additional contextual information, the value that can be extracted from it across an organization is multiplied significantly. Key factors such as where and when the data was collected or who/what it was collected from are central to understanding data more effectively.   6. The fight to become the “Amazon of the IoT” will intensify - As the IoT’s vast potential becomes more apparent, we will start to see a growing number of organizations fighting to establish themselves as the go-to provider of IoT solutions, or the Amazon of the IoT. This will spur the rise of the IoT mega-platform; vast one-stop-shop Platform-as-a-Service solutions. The battle will likely play out across both the consumer and enterprise spaces and many of the usual suspects are already coming to the fore. Apple, Google and Intel are all vying for control of our homes, while Microsoft, IBM and Oracle are fighting over our businesses, 
MCH's curator insight, December 30, 2015 2:48 PM

Great 

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Does Cell-Phone Radiation Cause Cancer?

Does Cell-Phone Radiation Cause Cancer? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Does cell-phone radiation cause cancer, or doesn't it? Consumer Reports experts review the research and offer commonsense steps you can take to protect yourself.
Richard Platt's insight:

“The evidence so far doesn’t prove that cell phones cause cancer, and we definitely need more and better research,” says Michael Hansen, Ph.D., a senior scientist at Consumer Reports. “But we feel that the research does raise enough questions that taking some common-sense precautions when using your cell phone can make sense.” Specifically, CR recommends these steps:

  • Try to keep the phone away from your head and body. That is particularly important when the cellular signal is weak—when your phone has only one bar, for example—because phones may increase their power then to compensate.
  • Text or video call when possible.
  • When speaking, use the speaker phone on your device or a hands-free headset.
  • Don’t stow your phone in your pants or shirt pocket. Instead, carry it in a bag or use a belt clip.
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