Internet of Things - Technology focus
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The consumerization of ruggedized devices

The consumerization of ruggedized devices | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
While many enterprises are shuffling mobile devices off to BYOD, ruggedized devices remain on the corporate purchase list.
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"Yeah, I want it ruggedized and recognize that I'm paying a premium for that but I shouldn't have to pay 10X what I would for any other device." - Signs in the mobile market including OS pricing and new hardware developments could mean that ruggedized device manufacturing can go main stream while delivering solutions that meet the technology needs of customers at a reasonable price point.

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Harvard's Michael Porter and PTC CEO Summarize the Impact of IoT on Companies

Harvard's Michael Porter and PTC CEO Summarize the Impact of IoT on Companies | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is changing more than products, it's changing companies' operations and organizational structure too.

Via ManufacturingStories
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5 Videos explain the different elements that Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter and PTC CEO Jim Heppelmann see with regards to the IoT and it's impact on firms.  Important stuff to comprehend.  For instance: 

Making the Transition: “For many companies, the change from the traditional manufacturing model, to this new world of smart, connected products is a daunting organizational transformation,” says Heppelmann in his fifth video.  Yet there are techniques companies can use to make the transition, he advises. One is to form a cross functional steering committee that oversees a smart, connected products program, or initiative. Another is to form a center of excellence by drafting talent from different parts of the business to develop best practices for the broader organization. Another is the formation of a new business unit so that other business units that can then retain a strong focus on the traditional aspects of the business.

“These are all transition techniques, probably all temporary techniques, on the path to some new normal that could be years down the road by the time a company really masters where they’re going,” concludes Heppelmann 


Definitely review all of the videos

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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 21, 2015 2:04 PM

#IoT #Connected #Devices #SmartDevices

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IOT Sparking A New Wave Of Analytics-Driven Innovation

IOT Sparking A New Wave Of Analytics-Driven Innovation | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
25% of senior business leaders report their organization’s use of IoT sparked a new wave of innovation thanks to data that gave them better insights. Data management and analysis are where the greatest percentage, 38%, have seen a positive change based on IoT adoption.
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The Industrial Internet and the Industrial Internet of Things

The Industrial Internet and the Industrial Internet of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

What is the Industrial Internet and is it different from the Industrial Internet of Things or IIoT? An overview with plenty of resources.


Via Francisco Maroto
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What is the Industrial Internet and is it different from the Industrial Internet of Things or IIoT? An overview with plenty of resources.

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The Power of IoT Devices

The Power of IoT Devices | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Multiple function integration in power management integrated circuits is maximizing the battery life of Internet of Things devices.

Via Francisco Maroto
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This proliferation of devices is also creating future growth in the power management IC (PMIC) market.  Designers of IoT solutions are relying on power management solutions to efficiently handle the power needed to energize a wide range of IoT devices, as maintenance and battery replacement are not cost-effective approaches. There are many power management solutions currently in the market, and depending of their characteristics, one power management solution can work better for a specific application depending on power conversion and power control options.  PMICs can now reduce power consumption of the batteries prolonging the power in IoT devices while also minimizing PCB size. PMICs are now achieving lower quiescent currents that helps to increase battery life. Maxim Integrated’s new MAX20310, for instance, is a power management solution that operates with battery voltages down to 0.7V for use with single-cell zinc air, silver oxide, and alkaline batteries. This solution includes a dual-output, programmable, micro-IQ high-efficiency switching converter with a 0.5μA quiescent current. It focuses on wearable medical devices and fitness applications such as non-rechargeable medical patches, environmental and equipment monitoring, and discrete sensors for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).

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KC smart-city efforts could save sewers, smooth traffic, fix potholes before they pop

KC smart-city efforts could save sewers, smooth traffic, fix potholes before they pop | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Smart-city technology holds hope for improving municipal services in Kansas City.
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The Smart Flush (Smart Sewers):  Consider South Bend, Ind. Its sewer system, like the one in Kansas City, at various points combines flows from rainfall with what you flush down the toilet. In heavy storms, it’s often more than the pipes can hold. So sewage that should be treated instead overflows into waters in its raw, polluting state.  South Bend was under an order from the Environmental Protection Agency to stop dumping 2 billion gallons a year of untreated water into the St. Joseph River. The cost to fix the system topped $700 million — much of it in the heavy construction costs of new conduits and tearing up a city park to bury concrete basins.  So the city, wondering whether technology offered a shortcut, turned to experts at the University of Notre Dame. A series of sensors were planted in the sewer system, mostly on the undersides of manhole covers, to track where the water was going and when.  “Suddenly, we knew where the bottlenecks were at any given time,” said Kieran Fahey, South Bend’s director of long-term control plan management. “We could reroute.”  The switch of a valve here or a pump there in the middle of a downpour avoided overflows. Spending a little more than $10 million to make its sewers smart cut the cost of the looming fix by more than half — from $700 million-plus to about $200 million.  Kansas City is using the same smart-sewer outfit, Emnet, to piece together a network of sensors using sonar and radar to watch how much water is flowing through the system and where.  “When a storm comes over a city, it’s not uniform. It comes in waves and cells. It can be pouring one place and completely dry in another area of town,” said Tim Braun, an Emnet official. “So you shift the flow to where you have capacity.”

The smart sewer crowd talks about a near future of even smarter sewers — ones that can tell the difference between storm water and untreated sewage, even gathering real-time readings of E. coli bacteria. Information like that, they say, could make the working of valves all the more sophisticated when water threatens to overwhelm: Send the rainwater toward the river, the sewage to a treatment plant. 

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Internet of Things' security: The alarms are buzzing

Internet of Things' security: The alarms are buzzing | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is taking over the workplace and home, but what about the security questions that are still wide open?
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What is to be done? Altman Vilandrie thinks that one of the reasons why the companies are not taking much action is the costs of securing IoT devices which are expected to be as much as one-third of the IT spending budget. On the other hand, software giants Google and Microsoft are already taking action concerning IoT security. Google will offer its Google IoT core as a method of securely setting up IoT networks. On the other hand, there might be a necessity of government involvement, as advised by such cyber security experts as Bruce Schneier.   Whatever the course of action is taken, it is evident that the number of IoT devices is growing, and so is the threat of their security #Wide Open

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Testing the Internet of Things

Testing the Internet of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A look inside TUV Rheinland's Internet of Things (IOT) test center in Silicon Valley
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That tsunami of new IoT gadgets? They all have to be tested before they roll out into the world, not only to meet government regulations but to verify adherence to a host of voluntary standards, like WiFi, Bluetooth, ZigBeeThread and others. That is a lot of testing. And that’s why TUV Rheinland recently opened a huge Silicon Valley test facility in Fremont, Calif.  It’s important for testing to be near the design teams, says TUV Rheinland’s Sarb Shelopal, the company’s global director of wireless and IoT testing. Distance, he says—and Silicon Valley’s traffic—is a big deal when companies are trying to move fast.  “Typically at the testing point,” says Shelopal, “a product team typically involves eight to ten people, but could be as big as 100, including safety engineers, software engineers, and hardware engineers. And when a product isn’t passing, we need to get them all in, and they will change this piece of hardware or this bit of software.”  Many of the tweaks, he said, can be made on site, with companies only having to go “back to the drawing board if they have a huge flaw in their design.”

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Meggitt M4 (Meggitt Modular Modifiable Manufacturing)

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Tomorrow’s factories will be intelligent, highly responsive units—smart components will find their own way to becoming products using the ‘Internet of Things’ to talk to machines and people.

Meggitt Modular Modifiable Manufacturing (M4) is leading the revolution, turning traditional factory layout and flow on its head with a ground-breaking combination of present and future technology. 

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'Millions of IoT gizmos' wide open to hijackers after devs drop gSOAP

'Millions of IoT gizmos' wide open to hijackers after devs drop gSOAP | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Likelihood of patching for every affected system is zero
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More on the latest IoT hack - The vulnerability, dubbed Devil's Ivy aka CVE-2017-9765, can be exploited by overflowing a stack buffer by sending the camera's HTTP port 80 service a specially crafted POST command. From there, it's possible to gain control of the embedded system using some injected shellcode.  Axis found that the same problem affected 249 of its camera models, and has apparently patched its software – if you have one of the vulnerable gizmos, make sure you apply an update from the manufacturer. The underlying flaw wasn't its fault, but rather an issue with a popular open-source code library called gSOAP.

This communications library, managed by Genivia, has had more than a million downloads by programmers, and is used by such big names as Microsoft, IBM, Adobe and Xerox. It allows hardware to be configured and controlled via web connections. The researchers found that the flaw was deep inside the software, and it can be exploited by an attacker to execute code remotely on an affected device.  "We named the vulnerability Devil's Ivy because, like the plant, it is nearly impossible to kill and spreads quickly through code reuse," the team said.  "Its source in a third-party toolkit downloaded millions of times means that it has spread to thousands of devices and will be difficult to entirely eliminate. It is likely that tens of millions of products – software products and connected devices – are affected by Devil's Ivy to some degree."  Genivia has now patched the issue in gSOAP, but that's not the end of the problem. Now developers who have used the library will also need to patch their code, and push fresh firmware out to gadgets and gizmos worldwide, and experience suggests that that's not going to happen any time soon.

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Book excerpt: 'Securing the Internet of Things'

Book excerpt: 'Securing the Internet of Things' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In this excerpt from chapter four of 'Securing the Internet of Things,' authors Shancang Li and Li Da Xu discuss IoT security methods, including authentication and digital certificates.
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Technically, IoT consists of uncountable devices, sensors, or actuators or simply objectives connected to services in the Internet. These objectives are from different vendors, communities, or standard groups. Most of these devices speak different protocols, which make the IoT hard to be implemented. In this case, the devices identify management as one of the most important common technologies, which should be able to coordinate different protocols, standards, scenarios. From a security point of view, security protection should be provided for "Identities of things" in heterogeneous communication and machine-to-machine security. The security challenges are related to identification, authentication, privacy, trustworthiness, and confidentiality. The identification is one of the most important challenges in security of IoT. 

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IoT Needs To Get More Flexible | EE Times

Flexible hybrid electronics can deliver much of what is promised for the future world of the Internet of Things.
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Most IoT concepts have yet to be realized in volume production due in part to the lack of inexpensive, mass-distributed sensor systems. FHE is well positioned to fill the gap for many industrial, medical, automotive and consumer applications.

The requirements for FHE include:

  • Printing conductors on flexible substrates
  • Printing sensors or passive elements
  • Placing and mechanically and electrically integrating bare die
  • Placing and mechanically and electrically integrating passives

The image at the bottom of the page shows an example of a smart wound patch. This health and performance monitoring system is now under development by NextFlex.  A closed-loop sensing system monitors the oxygen levels in a wound and releases oxygen at levels required for optimal healing. A control system connected to the smart wound dressing monitors the sensor parameters and controls the release of drugs. Data collection of drug release and wound condition are wirelessly transmitted through a low-power Bluetooth system.  This example uses flexible materials for the wound dressing, while the control system is based on a rigid board and casing design. Moving this design to the market will require redesigning the rigid control module and deploying it on an FHE platform to reduce size and weight and offer conformal and stretchable properties for the patient applying the wound dressing to the body.

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How to secure your IoT deployment in 10 steps | ZDNet

How to secure your IoT deployment in 10 steps | ZDNet | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Seemingly every day there's another story about Internet of Things (IoT) devices being compromised or used for large-scale attacks. Here are 10 steps to ensure that your deployment remains secure.
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1. Make security a feature

2. Don't buy into 'security through obscurity'

3. Consider security as cheap insurance

4. Play hacker

5. Go for the minimum

6. Check all your components

7. Provide an update capability (as long as it doesn't present a backdoor)

8. Use the right hardware

9. Map your system, end to end

10. Perform some 'IoT estate planning'

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Industrial IoT at Scale: What’s Really Needed - RTInsights

Industrial IoT at Scale: What’s Really Needed - RTInsights | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Part 1: Limitations of Cloud-Centric Architectures
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In summary, unless you can guarantee that the connectivity, bandwidth, latency, cost and security requirements of your application are compatible with a cloud-centric architecture (1) you need a different paradigm, and (2) 99.9% of the IoT platforms available on the market are not of much use.

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Finding a Way in the Fog

Finding a Way in the Fog | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Race to Outpace Hackers vs. Smart Infrastructure
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In the wake of automation adoption and cybersecurity demands, utilities now need to upgrade their networks to keep pace with best practices. Although public wireless networks seem like a viable option, for most critical utility functions, they pose too much quality and security risk.   Private wireless networks using licensed radio frequencies is one solution that is considered a best practice for utility networks. To create the network, utilities can either deploy their own network or partner with a private network provider that has strict rules in terms of access and connectivity to the public networks. These networks rely on state of the art software defined radios (SDRs) that use a variety of licensed industrial radio spectrum. These technologies are capable of changing frequencies over a wide range quickly to adapt to changing needs including interference and even intentional jamming. Selection of technologies and in-depth insight on developing these new networks has been clearly laid out for the industry within a new standard.  The electric utility industry, through its leading research arm, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is driving a new IEEE standard known as 802.16s, or GridMAN, for actively defending against and preventing disorder caused by these types of hacker attacks. This new standard expands the existing 802.16 standard, which originally only allowed for channel bandwidth of 1.25 MHz and greater to narrower-band communications of 100kHz and 1.25 MHz in channel size. This expansion of channel sizes has opened numerous new radio frequencies, and new technologies for either a completely utility-owned and operated network to new services dedicated just to mission critical traffic.

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These IoT devices shown at MWC mean business

These IoT devices shown at MWC mean business | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Along with all the hype about phones and 5G networks, Mobile World Congress 2017 was also a showcase for the internet of things, including IoT gear for enterprise and government use.

Via Francisco Maroto
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Some excellent examples of IoT sensors being applied to solve real issues 

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Internet of Things: Complete IoT guide - benefits, risks, cases, trends

Internet of Things: Complete IoT guide - benefits, risks, cases, trends | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
From Internet of Things to Internet of Everything and beyond: an IoT guide with definitions, IoT cases across industries, IoT evolutions and more.

Via Francisco Maroto
Richard Platt's insight:

IoT converges industries and specializations, uniting IT (Information Technology) and OT  (Operational  Technology) and contributing to industrial transformation  (Industry 4.0) and a wave of use cases which are either cross-industry or typical to a specific sector. As of June 2017 the main areas of IoT investments (industries and use cases) include manufacturing operations, transportation, smart grid technologies, smart buildings and, increasingly consumer IoT and smart home technologies.  Just like connected cars, smart buildings are typical cross-industry use cases and can include many areas, depending on type/goal/scenario, such as building management, light and room control, HVAC, energy efficiency and monitoring (from low voltage to critical power environments), asset management of key building assets, factory building management, the list goes on as we’ll tackle further. - Awesome Read if you're doing an IoT project 

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Universal plug and play: a few precautions

Universal plug and play: a few precautions | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Do you remember routers from 15 years ago? Most of you were probably not networking computers back then. Dial-up was still the way most people connected to the internet. I
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A lot of the things you buy today will connect to a remote server and you’ll never know it. This is a problem because the majority of the webcams, lightbulbs and other IoT devices out there have notoriously bad security. Some webcams only require changing a number in a web address to view another person’s webcam. Light bulbs have been used by hackers to monitor traffic on networks. If you don’t know something is connected to the internet, you don’t know that you might need to secure it.  -  Another issue with opening ports is that it gives more avenues for attackers into your network. Some applications are not vulnerable on port 80 or 443 but are vulnerable on other ports. If hackers are able to get into your router, they could open ports to allow them easier access to your network. The WannaCry worm that hit the world two months ago spread via port 445. Hackers could also set up a server on your network and open a port that allows the server to talk remote command servers or even operate as a remote command server.

 I’m not suggesting everyone immediately turn off UPnP. Doing that would likely cause you problems. You can manually forward ports on your router but for a nontechnical person it can be confusing and frustrating. But be aware that this is happening. Your Xbox or PlayStation is not likely to cause you any problems if it opens up ports. That $30 webcam you bought from a manufacturer you’ve never heard of has a good chance of being a problem for you in the future.  There are tools on the internet that allow you to see what ports you have open. You can use “shields up” at grc.com to show you all of the open ports on your network. I use it once a month or so to make sure no new ports are open that I’m not expecting.
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How a fish tank helped hack a casino

How a fish tank helped hack a casino | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A hacker used a fish tank to hack into a casino, which could change the way IoT technology is handled by businesses.
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The hackers attempted to acquire data from a North American casino by using an Internet-connected fish tank, according to a report released Thursday by cybersecurity firm Darktrace.

The fish tank had sensors connected to a PC that regulated the temperature, food and cleanliness of the tank.  “Somebody got into the fish tank and used it to move around into other areas (of the network) and sent out data,” said Justin Fier, Darktrace’s director of cyber intelligence.  As for what people can do to protect themselves against these kinds of attacks, customers should educate themselves about IoT products and take advantage of any security protection the product offers, Nigam said. He added that people should use the latest operating systems and software and constantly update them.  The fish tank incident was one of nine unique threats mentioned in Darktrace’s annual report of innovative hacks. Some of the other threats mentioned included hackers using company servers to acquire bitcoin, a digital form of currency, and former employees using their old login credentials to steal company data.

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CIOs And CTOs Must Understand How The Internet Of Things Is Changing How Business Is Done

CIOs And CTOs Must Understand How The Internet Of Things Is Changing How Business Is Done | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things (IoT) is forcing telecom providers, enterprises and cloud providers to change their business models not to just thrive, but survive. Although not new, advances in interest, infrastructure and information have put IoT in a position to fundamentally change how business is done.
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First and foremost, it’s important to remember IoT is not new. In fact, one could argue industrial IoT was invented by stalwarts like Johnson ControlsHoneywell, Itron, General Electric and Schneider Electric last century through their sensors, meters and other devices used to monitor and manage HVAC, SCADA and other energy assets. What’s changed are improvements in interest, infrastructure and information. While there is considerable hyperbole around IoT, the demand on traditional industrial IoT (IIoT) platforms and infrastructure has never been greater. IIoT is fundamentally changing how businesses manage their critical assets and the data originated from each endpoint. Moreover, traditional IoT is forcing telecom providers, enterprises and cloud providers to change their business models not to just thrive, but survive. 

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Abrams Autoloader (Meggitt)

Autoloader for M1 Abrams https://www.meggittdefense.com/index.php/compact-autotoloader?task=view&id=152
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Just in case you've never seen an what an Autoloader actually does in a tank like the Abrams - short video for you

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Everything you need to know about Bluetooth Mesh

Everything you need to know about Bluetooth Mesh | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
If you want to learn about Bluetooth Mesh (and everyone in the Internet of Things should), then this week’s Internet of Things Podcast is for you. Stacey Higginbotham and Kevin Tofel give the…
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Stacey Higginbotham and Kevin Tofel give their initial thoughts on Bluetooth Mesh, and then the Stacey talks with Ken Kolderup of Bluetooth SIG to go deeper. Learn about how the Bluetooth SIG worked around power constraints to make it work.  Also in this edition: Google Glass goes to the factory, and IoT platform gets major funding, IoT security vulnerabilities, low power wide area networks and an FBI warning about smart toys.

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New Bluetooth standard supports mesh networking for the Internet of Things

New Bluetooth standard supports mesh networking for the Internet of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New Bluetooth standard supports mesh networking for the Internet of Things - SiliconANGLE
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“In the same way the connected device market experienced rapid growth after the introduction of Bluetooth Low Energy, we believe Bluetooth mesh networking can play a vital role in helping early stage markets, such as building automation and wireless sensor networks, experience more rapid growth,” Mark Powell, executive director for Bluetooth SIG, said in a media release.   Because the new standard is just that, there are currently no devices on the market that support it. That said, given the speedy adoption of the Bluetooth Low Energy standard before it, coupled with seemingly strong support for mesh networking capabilities, devices that support the new standard will likely start to appear on sale at some point in the first half of 2018.

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Nasty Bug Left Thousands of Internet of Things Devices Open to Hackers

Nasty Bug Left Thousands of Internet of Things Devices Open to Hackers | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Security researchers have found a new bug that would allow hackers to take full control of several types of Internet of Things devices.
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Security researchers found a bug in an open source software library that, when tested on an Internet of Things camera, allows hackers to remotely access the video feed of a camera, install a backdoor in the device, or block the camera's owner from accessing it. Researchers say it would work on other IoT devices as well—in other words, hackers would have total control over the vulnerable products, they said.  "We basically have complete control of the camera as if it was our own computer," said Stephen Ridley, founder of security startup Senrio in a phone call with Motherboard.

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Internet of Things in the enterprise: The state of play | ZDNet

Internet of Things in the enterprise: The state of play | ZDNet | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things can be a major driver of digital transformation, enabling new business models based on widespread devices and new data streams--if you can cope with the immature ecosystems.
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Today's enterprise IoT landscape is a crowded and potentially confusing mix of specialist service providers, enterprise technology companies, cloud providers, telcos and systems integrators. All are in the business of helping companies to integrate IoT devices with traditional enterprise systems via communications channels (usually wireless), gateways and custom IoT software platforms, with analytics and security baked in at multiple levels.

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Jet Propulsion Lab's IT CTO tells enterprises how to network IoT

Jet Propulsion Lab's IT CTO tells enterprises how to network IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The internet of things combined with cloud computing is the platform for innovation that is used by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and that should be used by enterprises, but it means setting up the right network infrastructure, say JPL's IT CTO.
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The low cost of IoT devices combined with the low cost of cloud computing means enterprises can vastly expand the trials they run, and experimental failure holds fewer negative consequences. “Take this new technology and apply it into the enterprise. Fast. High-risk,” he says. “Reward failure, because failure doesn’t cost anything in this case.”  -  Blending IoT plus other technologies such as intelligent assistance (think Gooble’s Alexa), cloud computing and new interfaces with computers such as speaking, gesturing, blinking and soon even thinking, it creates a very different problem-solving architecture, he says. A person in an intelligent room could gesture or blink to initiate a query.

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Underground infrastructure gets intelligence

Underground infrastructure gets intelligence | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is one of the hottest topics in IT right now: smart watches, smart lighting, smart homes and smart cities are just a few of the potential applications.
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Engineers at Cornell University in the US have been testing several advanced sensors to measure strain, temperature, movement and leakage that have been developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction at the University of Cambridge.   They installed these sensors on a length of hazard-resilient pipeline being tested to see how well it could withstand an earthquake, and it came through with flying colours.  -  This was the first use of these advanced sensors and the pipe’s performance, not the sensing technology itself, was the prime focus of the study.  -  However, the advanced sensors also piqued the interest of participating engineers looking for new ways to monitor the performance of underground infrastructure. And as cities begin to adopt the sensor technologies, more data will exist not just for infrastructure, but for the surrounding environment as well.

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