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The Internet of Things and M2M – Some Predictions for a Bubbly Next Few Years | Blue Hill Research

The Internet of Things and M2M – Some Predictions for a Bubbly Next Few Years | Blue Hill Research | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
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The best prognostication so far on IoT, where it is going and who is going to be using it - Definitely a worthwhile read

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Cheryl Palmer's curator insight, February 19, 9:41 PM

INTERNET OF THINGS - Blog post by Tony Rizzo,  a Blue Hill Researcher on where the Internet of Things is headed in the next year or two. Has links to source information and further research. Well written with data to back up predictions.  A really interesting post that makes me think about how the IoT will change the way we do business.

Internet of Things - Technology focus
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How Smart, Connected Products Are Transforming Competition

How Smart, Connected Products Are Transforming Competition | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Information technology is revolutionizing products. Once composed solely of mechanical and electrical parts, products have become complex systems that combine hardware, sensors, data storage, microprocessors, software, and connectivity in myriad ways. These “smart, connected products”—made possible by vast improvements in processing power and device miniaturization and by the network benefits of ubiquitous wireless connectivity—have unleashed […]
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Another leap in productivity in the economy will be unleashed by these new and better products. In addition, producing them will reshape the value chain yet again, by changing product design, marketing, manufacturing, and after-sale service and by creating the need for new activities such as product data analytics and security. This will drive yet another wave of value-chain-based productivity improvement. The third wave of IT-driven transformation thus has the potential to be the biggest yet, triggering even more innovation, productivity gains, and economic growth than the previous two.  -  Some have suggested that the internet of things “changes everything,” but that is a dangerous oversimplification. As with the internet itself, smart, connected products reflect a whole new set of technological possibilities that have emerged. But the rules of competition and competitive advantage remain the same. Navigating the world of smart, connected products requires that companies understand these rules better than ever.

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IoT: The Rubber Meets The Road - 3 Challenges

IoT: The Rubber Meets The Road - 3 Challenges | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
IoT can demonstrate meaningful business value today, but there are still significant challenges to meet.
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The 3 Challenges Are:
  1. Automating decisions: The engineering and analysis work for automating decisions requires significant investment, and will likely take multiple years to execute in any substantial domain, especially if starting from scratch. (e.g. The refrigeration project mentioned above was three years of work. The project team involved three parties; software and services vendor Verisae, a systems integrator specializing in facilities management, and retailer IT and business staff, all working together.)  - Among its tasks, the team needed to construct predictive algorithms for refrigeration systems maintenance, incorporating data from multiple telemetry sources and sensors.  - A critical requirement was to avoid false and duplicate alarms, because a field service call based on a false positive is expensive. This presented a significant challenge in bringing the project to life.   - Automating decisions has advantages and risks, in part because computing currently lacks the same discernment capabilities of the human brain.
  2. Limits of imagination: When automating complex tasks, we're usually working within familiar paradigms. As we define more and more of our world in digital terms pulled from ubiquitous sensors, the most familiar use cases will be replaced by completely new ways of doing business.  - Reimagining our world is difficult, and the gap between computing and the human brain remains a significant barrier in thinking of new ways to use these technologies.  - Dr. Carmen Simon is a cognitive neuroscientist looking at this very problem. She noted the following points:  "In order for machine intelligence to be fully formed, mimicking human intelligence, it needs the ability to sense the environment, which it can do now; become self-aware, which machines are getting better at doing; and predict the future, meaning setting goals and plotting strategy.  We may be almost there, but this is where the machine needs more help by learning from the human brain, which is constantly on fast-forward. There is little adaptive advantage for the brain to be in the moment, meaning our brains can’t help but look forward. If it seeks intelligence, the machine must catch up."
  3. Fast data: As more data is created and moves faster, finding and reacting to the right data becomes harder. Software can solve a significant part of this problem using techniques such as filtering and applying logical rules to data before it ever reaches storage, allowing data to “stream” through systems while being carefully monitored.
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CyberLightning Charts Path to Intelligent Internet of Everything With New Release of CyberVille Platform

CyberLightning Charts Path to Intelligent Internet of Everything With New Release of CyberVille Platform | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
ESPOO, FINLAND--(Marketwired - Apr 23, 2015) - CyberLightning Ltd. today announced release 2.0 of the CyberVille® software platform, which provides a "see it at a glance" view, advanced analytics and functional control of the complex sensor and machine networks that comprise the Internet of Everything (IoE). With the addition of...
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release 2.0 of the CyberVille® software platform, which provides a "see it at a glance" view, advanced analytics and functional control of the complex sensor and machine networks that comprise the Internet of Everything (IoE). With the addition of powerful edge-device functionality and support for independent yet connected instances of the application, organizations can implement systems that learn from the collected data and operating inputs of smart nodes and various network layers. 

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Apple's potential to use diamond coated touch surfaces and vibrations simulating materials and textures

Apple's potential to use diamond coated touch surfaces and vibrations simulating materials and textures | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Using vibrations and temperatures, Apple would be able to simulate the feeling of different materials on a flat trackpad.
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Since as early as 2011, the company has explored ways to advance touch technology through the use of haptics, or force feedback, according to Patently Apple. And several companies, among them Disney Research and Microsoft, are also exploring ways to simulate textures on a touch display, Apple Insidernotes.

Apple first filed its Touch Force patent application in October 2013 and credits Apple engineer Paul Puskarich for the invention.

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The Rise of Counterintelligence in Malware Investigations

The Rise of Counterintelligence in Malware Investigations | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The key to operationalizing cybersecurity threat intelligence rests in the critical thinking that establishes that a given indicator is, in fact, malicious.

Via Constantin Ionel Milos / Milos Constantin
Richard Platt's insight:

Most dynamic malware detection solutions will search for any network connectivity that malware makes. However, what they don’t do is determine if the network connectivity is actual malicious traffic or if it is a false trail. Malware can generate a smoke screen of DNS queries and network traffic simply to hide the “real” malicious traffic in a stream of noise that makes it difficult to reverse engineer.

In fact, it’s not unusual for malware to generate traffic to mock various individuals or companies. This is not limited to network traffic; it could be strings in the binary, user-agents, WHOIS data, or anything that can be manufactured to waste the time of the researcher or to troll others.  -  While amusing, there are far more destructive forms of deception that can and have been employed. If organizations are not scrutinizing the processing of their data, malicious threat actors can poison it to cause outage events.  The key to operationalizing CTI rests not simply in generating indicators of compromise; the key rests in the critical thinking that establishes the confidence that a given indicator is, in fact, malicious. Far too many organizations and researchers simply mine for indicators and use those indicators without scrutiny. Malicious actors know this, and it seems like they are starting to use that against us.

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IoT Technology may be key to solving honeybee crisis

IoT Technology may be key to solving honeybee crisis | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
IoT solution enables agriculture innovation. Albert Einstein proposed that “if the bee disappeared off the face of the earth, man would only have four years left to live”. Essential for more than just sweetening our tea, bees pollinate food crops and allow us to eat a variety of fruits, nuts and vegetables. And they are ...

Via M2M World News
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The Mite Not solution from Eltopia uses cellular M2M technology by Gemalto and a compostable Smart Hive frame embedded with sensors that measure hive elements indicative of Varroa destructor mite breeding cycles. Gemalto’s M2M solution sends sensor data back and forth between the hive and a backend server and remotely controls the temperature in the hive. By raising the temperature by a few degrees at a critical phase in the mite breeding process, mite larvae are sterilized and reproduction is prevented. The elegant solution works without pesticides and it only requires one smart frame per hive for success.

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Consumers outweigh the CIO in the Internet of Things - VisionMobile

Consumers outweigh the CIO in the Internet of Things - VisionMobile | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
We continue with insights from our most recent publication, IoT Developer Megatrends – a short publication on the most important trends for IoT. In this post, we look at the potential of consumer and enterprise IoT markets. Enterprise IoT (industrial, large-scale applications) are currently the biggest market in terms of revenues, but will that remain so forever? Consumer applications like Wearables and Smart Home are hyped in tech media, but will that translate into a real business opportunity?
Richard Platt's insight:

The most popular verticals in which IoT developers are active are the Smart Home and Wearables: distinctly consumer-oriented sectors. The other verticals have a B2B orientation, requiring developers to sell their work to enterprises or partner with big companies to get their products to consumer markets. As a result, they are much less attractive to developers, and innovation will be slower there. The Connected Car market offers us an interesting view in what happens when a sector “consumerizes”. Up until now, developing car apps required partnering with car makers. Apple’s CarPlay and Android Auto enable – for the first time – a direct-to-consumer model for developers. Immediately we see an uptick in developer interest.

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IoT: The Legal Issues CIOs Should Consider

IoT: The Legal Issues CIOs Should Consider | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
For the CIO working on the successful implementation of an Internet of Things application, there are a host of legal issues that also need to be considered.
Richard Platt's insight:

Definitely a worthwhile read for those seeking to be informed, I would argue that if you're selling products to CIO's you need to know about this stuff too:  Data Ownership.  - Liability.  - Automated Contracts. - Maintenance ;  Help CIO's to address these challenges and you are closer to building a product / service that they'll want.

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We Need To Get The Internet Of Things Right

We Need To Get The Internet Of Things Right | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Nowadays, it seems that everything is connected to the Internet. There are connected socks, shoes, shirts, hats, glasses, appliances, beds, homes, drones,..
Richard Platt's insight:

To achieve the benefits of IoT, we must learn from our past mistakes and break down the silos that exist today. I have always been a believer that technology is a means to an end. In other words, it must serve a useful and beneficial purpose for people. We must get to the point where technology works for people, rather than people working for technology.  -  IoT is here, but our work is just beginning.

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Moore’s Law Shows Its Age

Moore’s Law Shows Its Age | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The 50-year-old Moore’s Law is reaching limits amid the many new steps needed to turn silicon wafers into the latest computer chips.
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“Moore’s Law is not having the same effect on the rate of gains we are seeing,” said Gordon MacKean, a senior director of Google Inc.’s hardware platforms team.  -  Some makers of data-storage chips are taking more dramatic steps. Producers of chips called NAND flash memory used in smartphones and an increasing number of computers have decided to stop shrinking transistors, worried that smaller circuitry won’t store data reliably.

Instead, they plan to stack circuits in three dimensions—32 or 48 layers per chip—rather than on a flat square of silicon to keep boosting the capacity of their devices.  -  Micron and Intel expect to produce so-called 3-D NAND chips that initially store as much as 384 gigabits of data, or three times more than conventional memory chips.  - Later this year, Intel expects to deliver a chip for specialized applications with eight billion transistors—or 133 million times more than chips than when Mr. Moore made his projection. - The WSJ not being a tech publication doesn't mention how Intel or other semiconductor firms can lower the cost reduction efforts necessary to lower the capital costs and manufacturing costs, only they only mention the advent of 3-D NAND.

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PCWorld and Jason Hope Warn Internet of Things Not Yet Secure

PCWorld and Jason Hope Warn Internet of Things Not Yet Secure | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Scottsdale, AZ (PRWEB) April 17, 2015 -- The Internet of Things may not be as safe as consumers would like, warns Jason Hope. A recent article on PCWorld points out serious security flaws found in up-and-coming Internet of Things devices that may keep consumers from embracing these devices in their homes.
Richard Platt's insight:

According to the article entitled "Researchers show that IoT devices are not designed with security in mind," a research team from application security firm Veracode took six up-to-date smart home devices and searched them for security issues. Five out of the six had serious flaws that could lead to a breach of security for the user.  -  The devices, which included the SmartThings Hub, Chamberlain MyQ Garage, Chamberlain MyQ Internet Gateway, the Ubi from Unified Computer Intelligence Corporation, the Wink Relay and the Wink Hub, all used remote control and monitoring to control home automation devices and sensors. -  "These findings are important to the home consumer," said Jason Hope, "because these are the areas that people want to use the Internet of Things in their homes. If they cannot do so certain that they are secure, they are going to avoid adding these devices into their homes."

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Wearable device transforms your thumb into a tiny trackpad

Wearable device transforms your thumb into a tiny trackpad | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are developing a new wearable device that turns the user's thumbnail into a miniature wireless track pad.
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They envision that the technology could let users control wireless devices when their hands are full – answering the phone call while cooking, for instance.  -  “It’s very unobtrusive. When I put this on, it becomes part of my body. I have the power to take it off, so it still gives you control over it. But it allows this very close connection to your body,” said lead author Cindy Hsin-Liu Kao, a graduate student at the MIT.  -  The device could enable subtle communication in circumstances that require it, such as sending a quick text to a child while attending an important meeting.

According to Kao, the device was inspired by the colourful stickers that some women apply to their nails.

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A Consumer Checklist for Home Automation Systems

A Consumer Checklist for Home Automation Systems | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

Excellent list and a set of criteria for evaluating IoT and IoH devices in the future. I really like the fact that they point out that some of the suggested directions for products and services in that they suggest that consumer say "No to the Cloud" in the home - "For most other home automation devices like thermostats, it is mostly a matter of data mining / customer lock-in, rather than user experience. - any sensible person would reject this"

The Checklist is a list of questions that consumers need to be asking about the devices that will help automate the home:

 1. Does the unit require an always-on Internet connection? What are its capabilities in an 'Intranet of Things' scenario?

2. Is it possible for authorized third-party applications or devices to control the unit without compromising security?

3. Does the installation require new wires or 'hubs' in addition to the main unit? How is the command center implemented?

4. What are the power requirements of the device? If powered via batteries, what type is used, and how often do they need to be changed?

5. Is the device a standalone product or a member of an ecosystem of products? What are the pricing aspects?


Definitely worth paying attention to.

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IoT-Connected Devices Leading to Rise in SSDP-based Reflection Attacks

IoT-Connected Devices Leading to Rise in SSDP-based Reflection Attacks | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
NSFOCUS Report States Online Gaming and Entertainment Sectors Continue to be High on the Target List and Attackers Are Becoming More Sophisticated
Richard Platt's insight:

The rise of IoT-connected devices responsible for an increase in SSDP reflection attacks: With the proliferation of the Internet of Things, any network-connected device with a public IP address and vulnerable operating system will increase the number of devices that could be used to launch SSDP-based reflection type attacks. This particular type of DDoS attack was seen as the second most dominant threat, after NTP-based attacks, in 2H 2014. More than 30% of compromised SSDP attack devices were network-connected devices such as home routers and webcams. Findings also revealed that globally, more than 7 million SSDP devices could potentially be exploited.

Attackers are becoming smarter: While 90% of DDoS attacks lasted less than 30 minutes, one attack lasted 70 hours. This shorter attack strategy is being employed to improve efficiency as well as distract the attention of IT personnel away from the actual intent of an attack: deploy malware and steal data. These techniques indicate that today’s attacker continues to become smarter and more sophisticated.
Online retailers, media and gaming remain top targets: As retailers, entertainment and gaming companies increasingly employ online environments, consumers demand the highest level of quality of service. By slowing down or flooding these servers, attackers look to take advantage of online businesses through a variety of means, including blackmail, unfair business competition or asset theft.

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KC's smart city 'Goldilocks' project bounds ahead

KC's smart city 'Goldilocks' project bounds ahead | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The largest smart city project in North America is moving closer to reality in Kansas City, Mo., mainly along a 2.2-mile streetcar line under construction through the downtown.
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The Kansas City Council voted unanimously Thursday night to direct its city manager to finalize a contract with Cisco and its partners to provide an array of video sensors, free public Wi-Fi, 25 interactive digital community information kiosks, smart lighting and other elements.  -  The city is expected to invest $3.7 million and Cisco and partners another $12 million over the next 10 years, according to the approved city ordinance and other documents.

Meanwhile, after weeks of rumors and speculation, Sprint said Friday that it is looking into working with the city on the project and is "excited about the possibility." Sprint's possible role could be as part of the planned Wi-Fi network, but it isn't yet publicly defined.

Some analysts have speculated that Sprint will use its connection with Google's Project Fi to enhance connections between Wi-Fi and cellular networks along the streetcar line.

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Turing Phone's Alloys and Encryption Make it Extra Strong, Extra Secure

Turing Phone's Alloys and Encryption Make it Extra Strong, Extra Secure | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Turing Robotic IndustriesThere's a new phone on the market, but it isn't from Apple, Samsung, Sony or any of the usual suspects. The Turing Phone is a one-of...
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The Turing Phone is made from liquidmetal, an easily molded yet strong alloy of five metals that's often used for smaller parts, but never yet for a whole device. This should make the phone fairly tough — it's not waterproof, but the company said that could change.  On the side you'll find a fingerprint sensor for unlocking the phone, and on the bottom is a magnetic charger like Apple's Magsafe. Inside, it's fairly standard high-end smartphone fare: a 5.5-inch 1080p screen, 3 GB of RAM and a 2.5 GHz quad-core processor inside, a 13-megapixel rear camera and 8-megapixel one on the front for selfies.  -  At $740 for the 64GB version, the Turing Phone sure isn't cheap, so unless any carriers take a risk and offer it for a discount, buying the device outright and unlocked is likely your only option when it ships in August.

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The Internet of things doesn't -- and shouldn't -- exist

The Internet of things doesn't -- and shouldn't -- exist | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
An open, fully connected environment is impossible and dangerous, which is why IoT is really a collection of separate networks
Richard Platt's insight:

Interesting article and pov.  "It's increasingly clear that much of what is called the Internet of things is the same old automation and machine-to-machine (M2M) technologies that have been around for a decade or more. Most of the rest is a set of proprietary home-automation technologies that address trivial needs and actually endanger many residences through poor security.

Why we don't want everything connected to each other - As more items communicate with each other and, most important, affect each other's behavior, we risk a nightmare as bad actors take advantage of the unseen access. Look at the damage that hackers and phishers do using the Internet on computers.

But wait until they can access building boilers and turn them into bombs, disable our door locks, open our garage doors, turn on sprinkler systems in data centers, and set self-driving cars to crash or simply stay put.  - I'm rarely a security alarmist, and security is in fact not the biggest challenge of the Internet of things. However, it shows why a truly open Internet of things is a questionable idea. (The bigger challenges involve the complexity of n-to-n workflow and technology integration. Not to mention user experience.)"

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Omnicomm releases fleet tracking mobile applications for iOS and Android

Omnicomm releases fleet tracking mobile applications for iOS and Android | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Omnicomm, one of the world leading developers and manufacturers of fuel consumption monitoring equipment and telematics solutions for various fleet management needs, released a mobile application for its cloud service Omnicomm Online. The application runs on iOS and Android platforms, and it is now available on App Store and Google Play. Following the intention to ...

Via M2M World News
Richard Platt's insight:

For convenience of mobile usage, the reports of the new application included the ones that are most popular among Omnicomm Online clients:

(1) Report on the location of transport - This report allows users to display information both concerning one vehicle and handle multicast requests, determining the location of several vehicles or the entire fleet at the same time.

(2) Report on the movement of a vehicle over a given time period  - Like in the web version Omnicomm Online, in this report it is possible to monitor the movement of transport in a given period of time. The track shows the events that occur on the way of the vehicle: refills, drains, stops, etc.

(3) Report on the volume of fuel - This report displays graphs on fuel consumption of vehicles, as well as the periods of running engine (on / off).

(4) Report on refills and drains - The report on refills and drains provides information on the changes in the level of fuel in vehicles, highlighting drains with red color.

(5) Statistics report - This report provides general data on the distance covered, the amount of fuel consumed, average speed and other parameters.

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Philips, Home Depot Launch $5 LED Bulb

Philips, Home Depot Launch $5 LED Bulb | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Similar 60W LED bulbs range in price from $8 to $13.
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In the long run, Philips' 60-watt LED will cost about $1.02 per year to run, saving more $62 more over the life of the bulb compared with traditional incandescents, the company said.

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Why Healthcare Big Data Analytics Needs the IoT

Why Healthcare Big Data Analytics Needs the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Healthcare big data analytics will rely on providers embracing the idea of the Internet of Things along with a patient-centered view of quality care.
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Many healthcare providers have had a rough time accepting that the EHR (electronic health record) is a critical, central tool for collecting and viewing patient data, but healthcare big data analytics requires organizations to take one step beyond thinking the EHR is important for patient care. In the Internet of Things, the EHR is just one small piece of a broader vision of data as a strategic asset: just one point of attachment in a spider’s web of information.  -  Embracing the centrality of the Internet of Things means relinquishing the idea that the provider is the only pillar around which healthcare revolves. While hospitals and physicians will always feature prominently in a patient’s quest for wellness, the decisions she makes in her daily life have just as much, if not more, impact on her likelihood of developing diabetes, heart disease, or lung cancer. These decisions are supported by and conducted through her connected devices, and healthcare providers must recognize the influence of these new technologies on the way patients view their health and the role of their providers.

Healthcare organizations that wish to succeed in an era where healthcare big data analytics is a necessity instead of a luxury must be able to acknowledge that the Internet of Things knows more about their patients than their basic EHRs ever will. Providers must put in the effort to utilize this information as a vital tool for strategic achievements instead of a burden on workflows and an annoyance to overwhelmed physicians.

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Intel's software evangelist talks cloud architectures and the IoT

Intel's software evangelist talks cloud architectures and the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Cloud architectures are moving to where Intel has been for ages, according to Chief Software Evangelist James Reinders.
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Building software, of course, is not a new development for Intel. It has a long track record in the specialised field of highly parallelised development tools for High Performance Computers (HPC) and all-out supercomputers using tens of thousands of processor cores to provide TeraFLOP performance levels.  -  That track record with highly parallelised operations is now no longer the exclusive domain of the pointy heads, however. With the coming of hyperconverged, microserver architectures running continuously delivered short lifecycle applications, experience in producing highly parallelised applications management becomes a skill that moves centre stage.   -  According to James Reinders, Chief Evangelist with Intel’s Software Products Division, the whole hyperconverged development is playing straight to the company’s strengths.

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Why Moore's Law Matters

Why Moore's Law Matters | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Infographics: “Making Small Things Makes Big Things Possible” — free to share! Help spread the word about how “Making Small Things Makes Big Things Possible”…  Please feel free to link to (links below), post, tweet, and share to your networks. Printed copies are also available.
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A better graphic for explaining the challenges of Moore's Law

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How Moore's Law Changed History (and Your Smartphone)

How Moore's Law Changed History (and Your Smartphone) | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
After 50 years, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore's prediction about semiconductor miniaturization still holds up.
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Making Moore's Law Happen:  Of course, the continued relevance of Moore's Law hasn't just happened by magic. Moore's prediction, while remaining accurate for 50 years, isn't actually a natural "law" like the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Shrinking the size of elements on computer chips so consistently and for so many decades has required incredible innovations like CMOS, silicon straining, VLSI, immersion lithography, high-k dielectrics, and most recently, FinFET or tri-gate "3D" transistor process technology. Those advances didn't just appear out of thin air because Moore's Law demanded they happen—brilliant, doggedly persistent people working in labs at universities and companies like Bell, Shockley Semiconductor, Fairchild, Intel, Toshiba, IBM, Advanced Micro Devices, TSMC, Samsung, and elsewhere invented them and thushelped extend Moore's Law, not the other way around.  -  Moore made his original prediction about the pace of miniaturization in computer chip components as a way to highlight the attractive economics in semiconductor manufacturing. By his own admission, he wasn't terribly confident that it would hold up over time. But in the ensuing decades, Moore's Law has become as much a challenge to the industry to keep it alive as an axiom for how chipmaking works.

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Breethe Aims for First Wearable Artificial Lung

Breethe Aims for First Wearable Artificial Lung | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) is the state’s public health, law, and human services university devoted to excellence in professional and graduate education, research, patient care, and public service.
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University of Maryland (UM) Ventures  and Breethe, Inc. announced April 13 that Breethe, an early-stage, Baltimore-based medical device company, has obtained exclusive rights to University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) intellectual property (IP) for the development of a wearable, portable blood pump oxygenator that will function as an artificial lung system for patients suffering from respiratory failure and cardiopulmonary collapse.

According to the American Lung Association , lung disease is the No. 3 killer (behind heart disease and cancer) in the United States, and is responsible for one in six deaths. Nearly 400,000 Americans die from lung disease each year. Breethe’s technologies will address unmet need for patients living with lung disease.

“There is growing demand for a new technology to take over the function of the human lung while allowing patients mobility,” said Griffith. “Our respiratory assist and cardiopulmonary support technology has the potential to dramatically improve patient care and quality of life by enabling otherwise hospital-bound patients to leave the hospital and resume more of their daily activities.”

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Beyond M2M to Enterprise IoT

Beyond M2M to Enterprise IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New IIoT software platforms are needed to connect and leverage applications running on edge-devices, gateways, enterprise servers, cloud services and mobiles to maximize the business value-add of Enterprise IoT.

Via jean-luc scherer, maher megadmini
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There are many potential ways (control, analytics, dashboards, event processing, mobile apps, etc.) to exploit all this newly accessible IoT data, but it needs to be delivered to the appropriate application in a timely manner wherever in the system that application may reside (on an edge device, gateway, enterprise server, tablet, or in the cloud).  Only then can the data be converted into new ‘actionable insights’ and thus new business value.

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Informed POV of former commissioner of o FCC - It Should Fight for Our Right to TV White Space

Informed POV of former commissioner of o FCC - It Should Fight for Our Right to TV White Space | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
“White spaces,” or unused radio frequencies in between TV channels, have long been eyed by technologists as perfect for connecting a sea of devices to the internet.
Richard Platt's insight:

Robert M. McDowell served as a Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission from 2006 to 2013 and was an ardent supporter of unlicensed uses of television “white spaces” for new technologies. "During my seven years as an FCC commissioner, I was a strong proponent of allowing innovators to use white spaces without having to get an FCC license. The TV frequencies are highly coveted because they can carry large amounts of data over long distances while penetrating buildings. Enabling consumers and technologists to take advantage of these radio bands in an unlicensed manner is seen as the epitome of the “permissionless” internet. Innovation could spread quickly without having to wait for government approvals.  Our template for success was the first generation of Wi-Fi: it seemed almost as though no one had heard of it on Friday, but by Monday everyone was using it."

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