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How Hard Can It Be To Make 3D NAND Flash Chips?

How Hard Can It Be To Make 3D NAND Flash Chips? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

I thinknThe NAND flash business is transitioning from the process that has been used for the past 20-odd years (let's call it "2D") and the new process that promises to carry the technology through the end of the decade: 3D NAND. Trouble is: 3D NAND is bearishly tough to manufacture.  This is [...]

Richard Platt's insight:

3-D NAND manufacturing needs a little help - try using some TRIZ to overcome those design and manufacturing process contradictions and constraints - you might be surprised with what you come up with-- just saying

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Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution

Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things transformation will have a big impact on the service and maintenance industries. Here are 4 ways service leaders must adapt.
Richard Platt's insight:

Porter, along with Jim Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC, summarized their findings from a November 2014 HBR article about how the Internet of Things (IoT) is disrupting various industries, field service included. The pair also spoke about ongoing research on the implications for company strategy and organization, which will be published in HBR later this year.

“Not only is the product changing, the product change is feeding back and changing how companies operate today,” Porter said. “How you run a company is going to change much more dramatically than in previous generations of IT.” 

1. Service businesses will shift from reactive to proactive:  There will be a transformation in the way service businesses are run and organized, as connected products allow technicians to diagnose the problem, or even perform service, remotely. Companies will be able to push updates to products in the field, and analyze product usage data to improve service efficiency and warranty management. As new IoT-enabled technologies take hold, service companies will move beyond the repair model to data-enabled advanced services that add value to customers. Ultimately, Porter said, this model will evolve to “product-as-a-service” as companies design new functionality and extend product life cycles. 

2. Big data will create an entirely new section of the value chain:    Companies will find ways to create value from the constant data stream from both internal and external factors. (Internal data could be product usage and equipment performance information, while external data could include weather conditions.)  Porter and Heppelmann said that, rather than having each division deal with its own data separately, companies need to create a “unified data group,” led by a chief data officer, that can store, aggregate and analyze the data — and work closely with other divisions to uncover insights that create customer value.

3. Product design will require a long-term, integrative approach:  Product design will become “evergreen,” said Porter, meaning products will be continuously re-designed and serviced via remote connections and services once they’re in the field. As a result, companies must find a new approach to product design that accounts for everything that happens after the sale is closed.  In addition, increased connectivity will require manufacturers to look at products within a larger, networked system. A “smart” tractor, for example, will have its own data analytics connections, but it must also interface with other smart machines on the farm.

4. Expect more consolidation and a war for talent: Porter frames the changes led by the IoT as an opportunity for companies to broaden their offerings and lead with innovative product functionality. There are two choices: cling to business as usual, or adapt. Companies that don’t react will have their products subsumed by companies that do. Porter predicts this will lead to further consolidation across industries, allowing companies to expand their market and products through data and IoT functionality. - But the biggest hurdle, Porter said, is likely to be the war for talent. There are currently too few people with the necessary mix of skills to tackle the new challenges presented by the IoT era.



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Ingo Scheidweiler's curator insight, June 19, 3:51 AM

Im Service 4.0 müssen sich auch die Service Bereiche anpassen. Viele liegen hier noch im Dämmerschlaf und kümmern sich um Minutenpreise im Call-Center oder Erstlösungsquoten. Vielen Chancen liegen in den neuen Industrie 4.0 und IoT Entwicklungen und ich empfehle, frühzeitig Projekte aufzusetzen, um sich hierfür zu wappnen. Design Thinking Workshops oder einfach nur simple Brainstorming-Meetings rund um mögliche Service Innovationen können ein erster Schritt sein. Erste Kunden von uns fangen bereits damit an ...

pohora's curator insight, June 19, 3:51 AM

Adapt or be subsumed by competitors with IoT shift.

Frank Boross's curator insight, June 24, 6:52 PM

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a scenario in which objects, animals or even people are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction. IoT has evolved from the convergence of wireless technologies, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and the Internet.

 

Evergreen design will change how we work in facilities management. After-sales or "service" data will become critical. A "smart" machine, for example a floor scrubber, will have its own data analytics connections for servicing, but it must also interface with other smart machines used in the building. This opens up all kinds of possibilities in facilities management. 

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The Artificial Intelligence AK-47 is coming

The Artificial Intelligence AK-47 is coming | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Despite Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking leading a creditable charge for a global autonomous weapons ban, a cheap, replicable AI weapon is inevitable.
Richard Platt's insight:

Actually not a new argument against AI becoming weaponized, think about the "Terminator" film series, with it's ubiquitous SkyNet.  Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking, Steve Wozniak, and many others all chiming in on the point that an weaponized AI race between nations is not in the best interests of humanity.  (duh)  - Nonetheless just because they and the rest of humanity do not want this to happen, doesn't mean it isn't going to happen. Self interested, power hungry nations and terrorist groups will in fact attempt to do this, do not be dissuaded from any of the political mouthpieces that say otherwise.  This is already a reality in the making, and I do know that for a fact (and no I won't go into how or why I know this).  Not to scare anyone, but to make them aware that this is already happening, and that an informed perspective is the first defense against the stupidity of those who would seek to threaten free human beings.  There will definitely need to be more debate required on this evolution of technology and it's use, as well as how to mitigate the threat of it.

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IBeacon helps visually impaired students find their way around Penn State campus

IBeacon helps visually impaired students find their way around Penn State campus | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Getting lost on campus is a grand tradition, a collegiate rite of passage to which even the best and the brightest in State College eventually succumb — with the possible exception of Madeline Garber.


Via Jesús Hernández
Richard Platt's insight:

Madeline Garber (blind student) at the Summer Academy for Students who are Blind or Visually held a demonstration of the iBeacon, a low-energy Bluetooth device that can provide students — blind and sighted alike — with a better sense of orientation indoors.  -  The demonstration began in Atherton Hall, where Garber — cane and iPhone in hand — traveled across several pathways and busy roads to the cafeteria at Pollock Commons.  Outdoors, she was guided by an app called Blind Square, which tells users where they are, where they are going or what is surrounding them — whether it be a potential obstacle or a Panera Bread.  Garber wore specially designed headphones that allowed her to clearly hear the instructions coming from her iOS device without completely stifling the sounds of the world around her.  “I feel that I can be a lot more independent while using it,” Garber said.  The GPS-driven Blind Square works best outdoors, but once inside it requires the enhancement of the iBeacon, a small Bluetooth device that can transform abstract space into navigable terrain.  Doug Williams, an educational consultant with PaTTAN, placed 13 iBeacons throughout campus, one outside of Atherton Hall and the other 12 inside the Pollock Dining Commons.

For the purpose of the demonstration, Williams and his team installed the iBeacons inside the dining hall after hours, placing units resembling ant traps under food stations, near the dishwasher and even in the kitchen.


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'Future Crimes': A sober warning about the IoT

'Future Crimes': A sober warning about the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
If you’re trying to decide whether to bring your e-reader or a hardback on vacation, Marc Goodman’s new tome “Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It” could help. By the middle of the first chapter you’ll be afraid to turn on your e-reader or laptop, and you’ll be looking with deep suspicion at your smartphone. Keep going, and you’ll be nervously eyeing your desktop, refrigerator and car. "FUTURE CRIMES: EVERYTHING IS CONNECTED, EVERYONE IS VULNERABLE AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT" By Marc Goodman Doubleday ($27.95). Why the anxiety? Because, as Mr. Goodman gets around to summarizing, “We no longer live life through our own innate primary human sensory abilities. Rather, we experience it mediated through screens,” and increasingly through
Richard Platt's insight:

“Future Crimes” is at its most foreboding when it catalogues the vulnerabilities in the blossoming Internet of Things. Everything north of your cat’s litter box will soon be connected to the web and controlled using smartphone apps. “So what could possibly go wrong?”author Mr. Goodman asks.   The focus of the book, though, is solidly on the darkweb / underworld.  -  Mr. Goodman’s background includes law enforcement and technology, starting with the Los Angeles Police Department and running through the FBI, and now as chair for policy, law and ethics at Silicon Valley’s Singularity University, a think tank and business incubator.  -  He’s prowled the online bazaars of the Deep Web, e-places with names such as Silk Road and the Dark Market. There everything from stolen identifications to drugs, guns and child pornography are hawked between anonymous parties who pay using cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.  


Mr. Goodman doesn’t stop with the IoT, but storms ahead into the criminal potential opened up by emerging robotics, nanotechnology and biotech. There he becomes most speculative and fascinating, as we are forced to contemplate a world in which the domestic terrorist or deranged outcast can ditch the gun in favor of made-to-order bacteria.  Mr. Goodman argues convincingly that we are addressing exponential growth in risky technologies with thinking that is, at best, incremental. His mantra is not that new stuff is bad, but that unexamined, unquestioning adoption of technology leads to a survival-of-the-sneakiest future.


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IoT will 'aggravate' data privacy compliance problems, Ofcom-commissioned study finds

IoT will 'aggravate' data privacy compliance problems, Ofcom-commissioned study finds | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

In its report on personal data and privacy (199-page / 1.26MB PDF), WIK-Consult said there is "no single solution" to address that "dissonance", and said the problem could get worse as more devices are connected with one another and data flows more freely in the so-called 'internet of things' (IoT).  "Although data flows in the IoT do not differ fundamentally from the data flows observed in any connected environment, the sheer increase in the number of connected devices multiplies the data that becomes accessible and analysable," WIK-Consult said. "If expectations about the take-up of such connected devices are correct, online tracking of personal data is likely to become seamless across all areas of people’s lives."  -  "Besides the increase in the amount of data, one may also expect that data gathering, aggregation and analysis will become even more subtle as machines talk to machines without (almost) any human intervention. Thus, consumers have even less opportunity to learn about data-gathering practices. In some cases, they may not even be aware that the device they are currently using is actually connected to the internet," it said. "Consequently, it is likely that the evolution towards the IoT will aggravate the issues outlined … for the status quo of connectivity."   -  WIK-Consult said that an increasing number of, and more complex, "contractual relationships" are likely to emerge as the IoT develops, which will reflect the increasing connectivity of devices and data flows. This is likely to mean that privacy policies will "become even longer and more difficult to understand"

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Big Data and Predictive Analytics: Hope or Hype?

Big Data and Predictive Analytics: Hope or Hype? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Predictive analytics is not a new phenomenon. It has been in existence for decades and finally coming of age. Businesses across the globe are looking to use

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Richard Platt's insight:

Types of Business Analytics  

(1) Descriptive Models:  Descriptive models look into customer’s history to often classify prospects into groups and categorize customers by preferences and life stage. Descriptive models can help you uncover reasons for success and failures in the past, ultimately helping you make informed decisions in the present.   

(2) Predictive Models:  Predictive model uses rules and algorithms to help predict a given outcome from specified units. The objective is to assess the likelihood whether a similar unit in a different sample will exhibit exactly same performance. Predictive models often perform calculations during live transactions to evaluate risk or opportunity in order to guide a decision.  

(3) Decision Models:  Decision models describe the relationship between all the elements of a decision to predict the results. This model drives set of business rules to produce preferred action for every customer or circumstance.

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Only 10% of People Possess the Talent to Manage or Lead Effectively

Only 10% of People Possess the Talent to Manage or Lead Effectively | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Many have some of the necessary traits to manage, but few possess the combination of talent that helps teams achieve excellence.
Richard Platt's insight:
  • Managers with high talent are twice as likely to be engaged. In a study of 2,551 managers, Gallup found that 54% of managers with high talent are engaged at work -- twice the percentage of managers with limited talent. This finding has significant implications for organizations that find themselves struggling to break out of mediocrity. Gallup has studied engagement since the 1990s and repeatedly discovered that companies with high levels of engagement outperform others onbusiness outcomes. If organizations can find and hire more managers with high talent, they can likely raise their overall levels of engagement and performance.
  • Managers with high talent are better brand ambassadors. Typically, organizations hold managers responsible for helping employees understand the brand promise and know how to deliver it. But if managers don't know what sets their company apart, there is little chance their employees do. Organizations that hire managers based on talent are more likely to have a strong and effective army of brand ambassadors who understand and live the brand, and who can more successfully engage customers.
  • Managers with high talent are more likely to focus on strengths. Managers with high talent think differently about their jobs and organizations, and they think differently about how to develop their employees. When Gallup asked managers to choose the option that best represented their management approach, 61% of managers with high talent say they take astrengths-based approach, while fewer percentages of managers with functioning or limited talent say the same. Managers with limited talent are more likely than those with high and functioning talent to say they focus equally on employees' strengths and weaknesses.
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How video games are helping Vets with life after the war

How video games are helping Vets with life after the war | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With 22 U.S. war veterans committing suicide every day, Operation Supply Drop is using games to support young vets returning home.
Richard Platt's insight:

Great story / interview with vets using gaming technology.  "Operation Supply Drop": Gaming companies step up and offer those troops far from home battle boredom and fatigue by sending all sorts of games for troops in the field.  


From my professional innovation management pov I believe games are very useful for cognitive behavioral (modification) training - something that deserves more investigation and research to help humans overcome issues and challenges, there is more to this gaming technology that is of benefit for many in our society.

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Why the IoT favors dominance

Why the IoT favors dominance | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Tech developers face huge complexity building applications for connected environments – leading to the reinforcement of power hierarchies
Richard Platt's insight:

One of the factors contributing to the reinforcement of dominant firms and silos is the difficulty of developing and integrating internet of things applications. Functionality in highly distributed, ubiquitous computing environments involves many moving parts coming together in a coordinated, but on-the-fly way.   

Complexity:   Part of this is due to the focus on customisation: accommodating the infinite diversity in what people like, how they interact, and how they use things. In the same way that each of our homes, things and choices are different, we all have different preferences for connectivity, and what we want out of it.

This complexity is compounded by the variety of deployment environments. Take a motion sensor, for example. It might be used in a car, phone, house or any number of other places. As well as the individual user’s preferences about its use, each scenario has different data access concerns, resource requirements (power, connectivity), functional constraints, and other integration needs. Things can be mobile or fixed; always on, or sometimes on. And there’s data – lots of data. All of this needs management.   

Uncertainty and Unpredictability:  To deal with this unpredictability, today’s developers tend towards one of three approaches. The first is to build “closed” systems: X’s sensing home, or Y’s health monitoring system. This is a somewhat old-fashioned, limiting view of the internet of things – where components are built for very specific purposes, and any customisation or management must be designed into the system by the developers themselves. This impacts scalability, limiting the integration of other components.

The second alternative is building things to be part of a particular technical ecosystem, such as a platform like Apple’s HomeKitGoogle’s Nest and Brillo, or AllJoyn by the AllSeen Alliance. These offer developers tools, services and other components – most of which are offered by those who control the ecosystem – to assist in the development and management of the components they build. The downside is that the interoperability regime itself can create network effects and potential lock-in with the big players.

The Path Forward:    So, is there a way out? Perhaps, given the internet of things is still evolving. But the path to countering the strong forces favouring dominance is far from easy.  From a technical standpoint, it is possible to leverage and build upon existing mechanisms for interoperability to achieve a more decentralised internet of things. To incentivise this, what is needed is robust legalethical and commercial recognition that the success of the internet of things depends on users having much greater and more meaningful control over data flows than they have had before, especially when they concern fundamental rights.

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Solidworks for Entrepreneurs Program assists startups with affordable 3D design software

Solidworks for Entrepreneurs Program assists startups with affordable 3D design software | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Dassault Systèmes, specialists in 3D CAD software, has launched the Solidworks for Entrepreneurs Program, giving early-stage businesses low-cost licenses for 3D design apps to aid in industrial design from prototyping through 3D printing. Solidworks apps are…
Richard Platt's insight:

Solidworks apps are used for product design, simulation, publishing, data management and environmental impact assessment. The program is designed to ease the way for cash-strapped hardware startups and incubators worldwide to more quickly complete their designs and bring their products to market.  Now, the program will enable entrepreneurs from around the world to apply for the software.

Applications are available from the company’s program site. The fee is $200, of which 80 percent goes to support the Rwanda High School Girls Scholarship Program that funds education for female students at the ETO Gitarama/Nyanza Technical School.  In addition to providing access to Solidworks software, the program may also offer co-marketing opportunities.

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Will datacentre economics paralyse the IoT?

The statistics predicting what the Internet of Things (IoT) will look like and when it will take shape vary widely. Whether you believe there will be 25 billion or 50 billion Internet-enabled devices by 2050, there will certainly be far more devices than there are today. Forrester has predicted 82% of companies will be using Internet of Things (IoT) applications by 2017. But unless CIOs pay close attention to the economics of the datacentre, they will struggle to be successful. The sheer volume of data we expect to manage across these IoT infrastructures could paralyse companies and their investments in technology.
Richard Platt's insight:

The Value of Information is Relative:  ABI Research has calculated that there will be 16 Zettabytes of data by 2020. Consider this next to another industry estimate that there will be 44 Zettabytes by 2020. While others have said that humanity only produced 2.7 Zettabytes up to 2013. Bottom line: the exponential growth in data is huge.

The natural first instinct for any datacentre manager or CIO is to consider where he or she will put that data. Depending on the industry sector there are regulatory and legal requirements, which mean companies will have to be able to collect, process and analyse runaway amounts of data. By 2019 another estimate suggests that means processing 2 Zettabytes a month!  -  One way to react is to simply buy more hardware. From a database perspective the traditional approach would be to create more clusters in order to manage such huge stores of data. However, a critical element of IoT is that it’s based on low-cost technology, and although the individual pieces of data have a value, there is a limit to that value. For example, you do not need to be told every hour by your talking fridge that you need more milk or be informed by your smart heating system what the temperature is at home. While IoT will lead to smart devices everywhere, its value is relative to the actionable insight it offers.

A key element of the cost benefit equation that needs more consideration is the impact of investment requirements at the backend of an IoT data infrastructure. As the IoT is creating a world of smart devices distributed across networks CIOs have to make a decision about whether the collection, storage and analytics happens locally near the device or is driven to a centralised management system. There could be some logic to keeping the intelligence locally, depending on the application, because it could speed up the process of providing actionable insight. The company could use low-cost, commoditised devices to collect information but it will still become prohibitively expensive if the company has to buy vast numbers of costly database licenses to ensure the system performs efficiently – never mind the cost of integrating data from such a distributed architecture.

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Japanese hotel boasts robotic staff

Japanese hotel boasts robotic staff | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Henn'na Hotel in Japan is garnering worldwide attention for the use of robots as its staff. CBS News correspondent Seth Doane visited the hotel to see what it's like to be greeted and helped by robots.
Richard Platt's insight:

Video - kinda interesting where technology can go, but my take is this kind of approach with robots in the retail world still has a lot more tech. dev to take place before it becomes more common place.

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Apple supplier LG Display to spend nearly $1B on 4th OLED display plant

Apple supplier LG Display to spend nearly $1B on 4th OLED display plant | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
LG Display on Thursday announced plans to devote almost $1 billion towards building a fourth OLED factory, one that could potentially be instrumental in keeping up with demand for products like the Apple Watch.
Richard Platt's insight:

When it is fully operational, (expected to be online 1H of 2017) the facility should have double the capacity of the company's present small- to mid-sized OLED line. In the meantime, some large LCD production capacity will be converted to OLED for the sake of cost competitiveness.  -  LG Display is one of Apple's primary LCD panel manufacturers alongside Samsung and Japan Display. Although Apple doesn't officially disclose its supplier connections, LG is believed to be responsible for a number of Mac, iPhone, and iPad displays, and the flexible AMOLED panel on the Apple Watch. - Why is this important to you?  Because LCD technology (OLED and AMOLED) are what those smartphone and smartwatch faces are made out of, it's a key enabling technology of the graphical user interface that everyone takes for granted.

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Qualcomm says it can now wirelessly charge metal phones

The best phones around are increasingly being made with metal bodies and frames, which has posed an issue for wireless charging. Metal phones have had to rely on supplementary cases if they want to...
Richard Platt's insight:

Qualcomm's description of how wireless charging will work for metal phones is lacking in detail. But for the most part, it sounds like the process will be about the same. As long as a device is within range of a wireless charging pad, it'll charge.  -  The new tech is being made available today to the companies that want it. Of course, there's still a battle going on between wireless charging standards, making it hard to tell how many companies will actually be interested in choosing Rezence. At the very least, Qualcomm seems to be giving phone makers one solid reason.

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IoT Connected Devices To Almost Triple To Over 38 Billion Units by 2020

IoT Connected Devices To Almost Triple To Over 38 Billion Units by 2020 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Total Device Base Driven by Surge in Connected Industrial Applications. New data from Juniper Research has revealed that the number of IoT (Internet of Things) connected devices will number 38.5 billion in 2020, up from 13.4 billion in 2015: a rise of over 285%. While IoT ‘smart home’ based applications grab media headlines, it is ...

Via M2M World News
Richard Platt's insight:

IoT Still in a Nascent State:  The new research, The Internet of Things: Consumer, Industrial & Public Services 2015-2020, found that while the number of connected devices already exceeds the number of humans on the planet by over 2 times, for most enterprises, simply connecting their systems and devices remains the first priority.

Additional Findings

  • The consumer segment (composed of the smart home, connected vehicles and digital healthcare), represents a high ARPU (average revenue per user) market segment.
  • Meanwhile, the industrial sector (composed of retail, connected buildings and agriculture) will enable high ROI (return on investment) through IoT projects, owing to more efficient business processes.


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The Intelligent Soldier System: Military Wearables

The Intelligent Soldier System: Military Wearables | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
When it comes to wearable technology for military applications, the needs of the users equate to life-or-death situations.
Richard Platt's insight:

Being ex-military myself and having had a hand in many technologies (high and low tech) that soldiers use this was an interesting article discussing the applications and challenges that this demographic has to deal with.  


"Military development programs revolve around improving the capabilities of the soldier. Technology platforms, whether they are wearable or not, and regardless of technical sophistication, will only ever be a part of the solution in this development process.  All of the military personnel at the HMS Belfast event agreed that too much of the development so far has been technology focused, without properly addressing the needs of the soldier. This is an expected problem for a small company looking to exploit new markets for their technology. At the other end of the spectrum, the likes of BAE Systems, Lockheed Martin, and others are involving military personnel earlier in the development process, but the challenge is significant because the stakes are at their highest."

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How retailers are selling the power of IoT

How retailers are selling the power of IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A dive into Sears' Connected Solutions hub and Target’s Open House reveals that a lot of connected devices have functions and price points that can appeal to the practical homeowner. 
Richard Platt's insight:

IoT could 'pay for itself':  

What is striking, even at Target where some of the items were on the out-there side (a smart baby onesie?) is that many of the things in its showroom are priced within reach. Again, the items may have been more than their non-smart (dumb?) counterparts, but nothing that would incite a gasp.  -  In fact, the difference in price seems in line with the added capabilities. (With larger appliances, like many of those bigger appliances available at Sears, the setup requires the purchase of an additional hub to connect it to the existing router. Many Sonos fans have also learned this the hard way).

“I think the price points are probably where they should be. What you have to consider is what it can do for you,” Ciovacco told Retail Dive. “A $250 wi-fi thermostat may not be worth it. That is, if you’re just using it because you can control it with your phone, it’s overpriced. But if you use it and take advantage of its ability to save energy, you can unlock a lot of savings that more than pays for itself.”

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Samsung's new monitor will wirelessly charge your smartphone

Samsung's new monitor will wirelessly charge your smartphone | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A new monitor from Samsung has an added feature -- integrated wireless charging for mobile devices.
Richard Platt's insight:

New monitor from Samsung has an added feature which we wouldn't mind seeing in more monitors from now on — integrated wireless charging for mobile devices.  If your mobile device supports Qi wireless charging — as Samsung's Galaxy S6, Google's Nexus 6 or LG's G3 do — you can simply place it on the monitor's stand, and it will be automatically charged.


Besides wireless charging, the Samsung SE370 brings a 1,920x1,080 pixel resolution, a response time of 4ms, 250 cd/m2 brightness, 1000:1 contrast ratio and a horizontal and vertical viewing angle of 178 degrees. It has a PLS type panel and has HDMI, DP and D-Sub ports.  The monitor will come in two sizes: 23.6 and 27 inches — the specifications are the same save for one detail; the 27-inch model is a little brighter at 300 cd/m2.  -  Pricing and availability have not been announced.


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How The Wrong People Get Promoted And How To Change It

How The Wrong People Get Promoted And How To Change It | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Research reveals that companies consistently choose the wrong people for management roles. Here's what you can do to avoid the same mistake.
Richard Platt's insight:

More on the Gallup Research about Talented Managers:

Gallup studied individual managers at numerous organizations, and discovered those managers who most consistently drove high engagement, loyalty, productivity, profit, and service levels all shared five uncommon talents:

  • They motivate their employees.
  • They assert themselves to overcome obstacles.
  • They create a culture of accountability.
  • They build trusting relationships.
  • They make informed, unbiased decisions for the good of their team and organization.

Gallup confirmed this combination of innate talent is so rare that it exists in about only one out of 10 people. They also believe another two out of 10 people have some of these five talents, and can become great managers with the right coaching and development.

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Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It

Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
I was driving 70 mph on the edge of downtown St. Louis when the exploit began to take hold.
Richard Platt's insight:

In depth analysis of the hack on the recent Jeep hack, video also included. Scary to say the least on what hacking a vehicle can do.  Makes sense that Chrysler committed to a full recall to address the issues, but I do think that this recall will only be the tip of the iceberg for all of the car manufacturers when it comes to this issue of car hacking.  The necessity of securing your IoT vehicle just got moved to the top of the list of priorities.  the threat of large class action lawsuits and Federal fines have a way of moving people to action.

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5 reasons IoT development will take longer than expected

5 reasons IoT development will take longer than expected | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New McKinsey report pours a dose of cold reality on the Internet of Things vision, noting that an intense re-alignment of IT systems and people will be needed.
Richard Platt's insight:

The report, authored by a team of McKinsey consultants says embarking on the path to IoT value requires progress in multiple areas: (1) improvements in basic infrastructure elements (2) lower-cost, more capable hardware components and (3) ubiquitous connectivity, (4) improvements in software and data analytics, and the development of (5) technical standards and the (6) technological solutions for interoperability.  

Above all, interoperability is key. McKinsey prognosis: not there yet.

Low-cost, low-power hardware is required. McKinsey prognosis: some progress made.

Ubiquitous connectivity will make the world go 'round. McKinsey prognosis: not there yet.

Analytics software -- and analytic people -- are needed to help have it all make sense. McKinsey prognosis: some are working on it, but's  tough when you don't have the talent in house to actually do it.

More attention needs to be paid to privacy, confidentiality, and security. McKinsey prognosis: this will be a lawyer's banquet

 

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Apple wants to personalize your TV experience

Apple wants to personalize your TV experience | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The maker of Apple TV envisions logging into the system with your fingerprint
Richard Platt's insight:

Another patent pending from Apple to control your TV experience with your finger

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Apple yanks Google's Nest smart thermostat from website and retail stores

Apple yanks Google's Nest smart thermostat from website and retail stores | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
You can no longer purchase Google's popular smart thermostat on Apple's online store or at its retail locations.
Richard Platt's insight:

Although the thermostat was only recently discovered as missing from Apple's product offerings, it was removed earlier this month. Apple was amongst the first retailers to carry the Nest when it debuted in 2011. Not surprisingly, it has already been replaced with the first HomeKit-enabled thermostat, the Ecobee 3 ($249).  Considering Google recently announced a competing platform called Brillo, it's unlikely Nest will become HomeKit compatible anytime soon or ever. The chances are high, however, it will serve as the centerpiece to Google's smart home system.  The company announced HomeKit in 2014 as a smart home framework that streamlines communication between iPhones and a home device. While the first batch of products only recently hit the market, more are expected to debut in the coming weeks.

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Running on Data

Running on Data | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With many millions of global consumers stepping, sleep monitoring, and syncing to the Internet of Things, activity trackers offer a unique window into the complex nature of the Internet of Things ecosystem.

Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

According to Deloitte there are several layers of activity mixed up in conversations about the Internet of Things (see figure). The most visible layer, at the bottom—the connected sensors that dominate the discussion among technologists—involves some complex and important decisions by the organizations implementing it. However, that complexity pales in comparison to the upper layers. It is these upper layers of IoT activity that, if not done well, can cause most IoT initiatives or products to struggle or ultimately fail. The true value lies in what is done with IoT information and, as with most business challenges, execution is everything.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, May 31, 10:57 PM

Best description so far on the point that "cognitive action" being helped is what people are really looking for, meaning the reducing of it, albeit not for engineers, who have to do it for what they do in their work which is designing products / technologies to off-load it.

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9 Tips for how Big Companies can Compete Against Startups | Big Tip: Innovate or Die

9 Tips for how Big Companies can Compete Against Startups | Big Tip: Innovate or Die | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The startup landscape can be a double-edged sword in the business world: either the company is going to disrupt the entire landscape or it's going to inspire. But what seems to have corporations terrified is how to wrap their heads around the impact startups are having on the traditional model. Is internal research and development enough? Or is outside assistance needed? And just where should these corporations start?
Richard Platt's insight:

I once had a friend and corporate colleague once complain to me about why there is this necessity of "Innovate or Die", a p.o.v. that I advocate (since my team and I had successfully deployed a systematic innovation program in a Fortune 10 company). And while I knew he was whining, I didn't have a better answer other than the necessity of competition creates that response from all of us.  But his question deserved a better answer and this article spells it out in more detail when it comes to setting up innovation labs as a part of a larger competency in the firm.  The harsh reality is that in innovation, it is easy to fail, and tough to succeed.  -  


The high-tech manufacturing segment is making the biggest bet on innovation, according to the report. This is notable as it’s related to advancements in the Internet of Things, the Maker movement, and 3D printing.  -  Telecommunications has the second highest penetration rate, which shouldn’t be surprising, as companies like AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Orange, Deutsche Telekom, and others are all looking to better understand the dominance of applications like Facebook (and its WhatsApp messaging app), Google’s Android operating system, everything Apple is doing, the latest in advertising, and anything else that people do with their mobile devices and Internet access.  In some cases, corporations are probably not interested in doing more than interacting with startups and fostering relationships, perhaps opening the doors to strategic investments or acquisition. Examples of this include the Walt Disney Company and Nike’s partnership with the Techstars accelerator and also Orange’s “Fab Force” program.

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Uber to deliver Xiaomi smartphones in Singapore and Malaysia

Uber to deliver Xiaomi smartphones in Singapore and Malaysia | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Uber Technologies Inc said on Thursday it would deliver Xiaomi Inc's new flagshiphandset, the Mi Note, to buyers in Singapore and Kuala Lumpur ina tie-up that showcases its ambitious expansion into
Richard Platt's insight:

Uber Technologies said on Thursday it would deliver Xiaomi's new flagship handset, the Mi Note, to buyers in Singapore and Kuala Lumpur in a tie-up that showcases its ambitious expansion into the same-day delivery business.  (Harder to do in the US against the likes of Amazon and Postmates)  -  As part of the Southeast Asian partnership, Uber users will be able to buy the new Mi Note using the Uber app on July 27, one day before it goes on sale on Xiaomi's website. The purchase will be charged on the user's Uber account and the handset will be delivered shortly thereafter to his or her physical location.  For Xiaomi, a company renowned for its marketing savvy, the partnership could generate more buzz for a product launch at a time when it is looking to expand rapidly into markets like Southeast Asia and India.

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