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A Feature on todays world full of Surveillance Technology

A Feature on todays world full of Surveillance Technology | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Todays Surveillance Technology
A great video with a feature on Surveillance Technology
and how it exists in various forms around us today,
everything from CCTV Surveillance, cellphone tracking to

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Long video, but if you can spare the time, decent enough

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Zahid Yakoob's curator insight, January 20, 2014 2:01 AM

Civil liberties and general privacy.

Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution

Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things transformation will have a big impact on the service and maintenance industries. Here are 4 ways service leaders must adapt.
Richard Platt's insight:

Porter, along with Jim Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC, summarized their findings from a November 2014 HBR article about how the Internet of Things (IoT) is disrupting various industries, field service included. The pair also spoke about ongoing research on the implications for company strategy and organization, which will be published in HBR later this year.

“Not only is the product changing, the product change is feeding back and changing how companies operate today,” Porter said. “How you run a company is going to change much more dramatically than in previous generations of IT.” 

1. Service businesses will shift from reactive to proactive:  There will be a transformation in the way service businesses are run and organized, as connected products allow technicians to diagnose the problem, or even perform service, remotely. Companies will be able to push updates to products in the field, and analyze product usage data to improve service efficiency and warranty management. As new IoT-enabled technologies take hold, service companies will move beyond the repair model to data-enabled advanced services that add value to customers. Ultimately, Porter said, this model will evolve to “product-as-a-service” as companies design new functionality and extend product life cycles. 

2. Big data will create an entirely new section of the value chain:    Companies will find ways to create value from the constant data stream from both internal and external factors. (Internal data could be product usage and equipment performance information, while external data could include weather conditions.)  Porter and Heppelmann said that, rather than having each division deal with its own data separately, companies need to create a “unified data group,” led by a chief data officer, that can store, aggregate and analyze the data — and work closely with other divisions to uncover insights that create customer value.

3. Product design will require a long-term, integrative approach:  Product design will become “evergreen,” said Porter, meaning products will be continuously re-designed and serviced via remote connections and services once they’re in the field. As a result, companies must find a new approach to product design that accounts for everything that happens after the sale is closed.  In addition, increased connectivity will require manufacturers to look at products within a larger, networked system. A “smart” tractor, for example, will have its own data analytics connections, but it must also interface with other smart machines on the farm.

4. Expect more consolidation and a war for talent: Porter frames the changes led by the IoT as an opportunity for companies to broaden their offerings and lead with innovative product functionality. There are two choices: cling to business as usual, or adapt. Companies that don’t react will have their products subsumed by companies that do. Porter predicts this will lead to further consolidation across industries, allowing companies to expand their market and products through data and IoT functionality. - But the biggest hurdle, Porter said, is likely to be the war for talent. There are currently too few people with the necessary mix of skills to tackle the new challenges presented by the IoT era.



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Ingo Scheidweiler's curator insight, June 19, 3:51 AM

Im Service 4.0 müssen sich auch die Service Bereiche anpassen. Viele liegen hier noch im Dämmerschlaf und kümmern sich um Minutenpreise im Call-Center oder Erstlösungsquoten. Vielen Chancen liegen in den neuen Industrie 4.0 und IoT Entwicklungen und ich empfehle, frühzeitig Projekte aufzusetzen, um sich hierfür zu wappnen. Design Thinking Workshops oder einfach nur simple Brainstorming-Meetings rund um mögliche Service Innovationen können ein erster Schritt sein. Erste Kunden von uns fangen bereits damit an ...

pohora's curator insight, June 19, 3:51 AM

Adapt or be subsumed by competitors with IoT shift.

Frank Boross's curator insight, June 24, 6:52 PM

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a scenario in which objects, animals or even people are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction. IoT has evolved from the convergence of wireless technologies, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and the Internet.

 

Evergreen design will change how we work in facilities management. After-sales or "service" data will become critical. A "smart" machine, for example a floor scrubber, will have its own data analytics connections for servicing, but it must also interface with other smart machines used in the building. This opens up all kinds of possibilities in facilities management. 

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How The Wrong People Get Promoted And How To Change It

How The Wrong People Get Promoted And How To Change It | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Research reveals that companies consistently choose the wrong people for management roles. Here's what you can do to avoid the same mistake.
Richard Platt's insight:

More on the Gallup Research about Talented Managers:

Gallup studied individual managers at numerous organizations, and discovered those managers who most consistently drove high engagement, loyalty, productivity, profit, and service levels all shared five uncommon talents:

  • They motivate their employees.
  • They assert themselves to overcome obstacles.
  • They create a culture of accountability.
  • They build trusting relationships.
  • They make informed, unbiased decisions for the good of their team and organization.

Gallup confirmed this combination of innate talent is so rare that it exists in about only one out of 10 people. They also believe another two out of 10 people have some of these five talents, and can become great managers with the right coaching and development.

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Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It

Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
I was driving 70 mph on the edge of downtown St. Louis when the exploit began to take hold.
Richard Platt's insight:

In depth analysis of the hack on the recent Jeep hack, video also included. Scary to say the least on what hacking a vehicle can do.  Makes sense that Chrysler committed to a full recall to address the issues, but I do think that this recall will only be the tip of the iceberg for all of the car manufacturers when it comes to this issue of car hacking.  The necessity of securing your IoT vehicle just got moved to the top of the list of priorities.  the threat of large class action lawsuits and Federal fines have a way of moving people to action.

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5 reasons IoT development will take longer than expected

5 reasons IoT development will take longer than expected | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New McKinsey report pours a dose of cold reality on the Internet of Things vision, noting that an intense re-alignment of IT systems and people will be needed.
Richard Platt's insight:

The report, authored by a team of McKinsey consultants says embarking on the path to IoT value requires progress in multiple areas: (1) improvements in basic infrastructure elements (2) lower-cost, more capable hardware components and (3) ubiquitous connectivity, (4) improvements in software and data analytics, and the development of (5) technical standards and the (6) technological solutions for interoperability.  

Above all, interoperability is key. McKinsey prognosis: not there yet.

Low-cost, low-power hardware is required. McKinsey prognosis: some progress made.

Ubiquitous connectivity will make the world go 'round. McKinsey prognosis: not there yet.

Analytics software -- and analytic people -- are needed to help have it all make sense. McKinsey prognosis: some are working on it, but's  tough when you don't have the talent in house to actually do it.

More attention needs to be paid to privacy, confidentiality, and security. McKinsey prognosis: this will be a lawyer's banquet

 

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Apple wants to personalize your TV experience

Apple wants to personalize your TV experience | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The maker of Apple TV envisions logging into the system with your fingerprint
Richard Platt's insight:

Another patent pending from Apple to control your TV experience with your finger

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Apple yanks Google's Nest smart thermostat from website and retail stores

Apple yanks Google's Nest smart thermostat from website and retail stores | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
You can no longer purchase Google's popular smart thermostat on Apple's online store or at its retail locations.
Richard Platt's insight:

Although the thermostat was only recently discovered as missing from Apple's product offerings, it was removed earlier this month. Apple was amongst the first retailers to carry the Nest when it debuted in 2011. Not surprisingly, it has already been replaced with the first HomeKit-enabled thermostat, the Ecobee 3 ($249).  Considering Google recently announced a competing platform called Brillo, it's unlikely Nest will become HomeKit compatible anytime soon or ever. The chances are high, however, it will serve as the centerpiece to Google's smart home system.  The company announced HomeKit in 2014 as a smart home framework that streamlines communication between iPhones and a home device. While the first batch of products only recently hit the market, more are expected to debut in the coming weeks.

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Running on Data

Running on Data | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With many millions of global consumers stepping, sleep monitoring, and syncing to the Internet of Things, activity trackers offer a unique window into the complex nature of the Internet of Things ecosystem.

Via Olivier Janin
Richard Platt's insight:

According to Deloitte there are several layers of activity mixed up in conversations about the Internet of Things (see figure). The most visible layer, at the bottom—the connected sensors that dominate the discussion among technologists—involves some complex and important decisions by the organizations implementing it. However, that complexity pales in comparison to the upper layers. It is these upper layers of IoT activity that, if not done well, can cause most IoT initiatives or products to struggle or ultimately fail. The true value lies in what is done with IoT information and, as with most business challenges, execution is everything.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, May 31, 10:57 PM

Best description so far on the point that "cognitive action" being helped is what people are really looking for, meaning the reducing of it, albeit not for engineers, who have to do it for what they do in their work which is designing products / technologies to off-load it.

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9 Tips for how Big Companies can Compete Against Startups | Big Tip: Innovate or Die

9 Tips for how Big Companies can Compete Against Startups | Big Tip: Innovate or Die | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The startup landscape can be a double-edged sword in the business world: either the company is going to disrupt the entire landscape or it's going to inspire. But what seems to have corporations terrified is how to wrap their heads around the impact startups are having on the traditional model. Is internal research and development enough? Or is outside assistance needed? And just where should these corporations start?
Richard Platt's insight:

I once had a friend and corporate colleague once complain to me about why there is this necessity of "Innovate or Die", a p.o.v. that I advocate (since my team and I had successfully deployed a systematic innovation program in a Fortune 10 company). And while I knew he was whining, I didn't have a better answer other than the necessity of competition creates that response from all of us.  But his question deserved a better answer and this article spells it out in more detail when it comes to setting up innovation labs as a part of a larger competency in the firm.  The harsh reality is that in innovation, it is easy to fail, and tough to succeed.  -  


The high-tech manufacturing segment is making the biggest bet on innovation, according to the report. This is notable as it’s related to advancements in the Internet of Things, the Maker movement, and 3D printing.  -  Telecommunications has the second highest penetration rate, which shouldn’t be surprising, as companies like AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Orange, Deutsche Telekom, and others are all looking to better understand the dominance of applications like Facebook (and its WhatsApp messaging app), Google’s Android operating system, everything Apple is doing, the latest in advertising, and anything else that people do with their mobile devices and Internet access.  In some cases, corporations are probably not interested in doing more than interacting with startups and fostering relationships, perhaps opening the doors to strategic investments or acquisition. Examples of this include the Walt Disney Company and Nike’s partnership with the Techstars accelerator and also Orange’s “Fab Force” program.

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Uber to deliver Xiaomi smartphones in Singapore and Malaysia

Uber to deliver Xiaomi smartphones in Singapore and Malaysia | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Uber Technologies Inc said on Thursday it would deliver Xiaomi Inc's new flagshiphandset, the Mi Note, to buyers in Singapore and Kuala Lumpur ina tie-up that showcases its ambitious expansion into
Richard Platt's insight:

Uber Technologies said on Thursday it would deliver Xiaomi's new flagship handset, the Mi Note, to buyers in Singapore and Kuala Lumpur in a tie-up that showcases its ambitious expansion into the same-day delivery business.  (Harder to do in the US against the likes of Amazon and Postmates)  -  As part of the Southeast Asian partnership, Uber users will be able to buy the new Mi Note using the Uber app on July 27, one day before it goes on sale on Xiaomi's website. The purchase will be charged on the user's Uber account and the handset will be delivered shortly thereafter to his or her physical location.  For Xiaomi, a company renowned for its marketing savvy, the partnership could generate more buzz for a product launch at a time when it is looking to expand rapidly into markets like Southeast Asia and India.

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Operationalizing The IoT: 4 Things You May Be Missing In Your Strategy

Operationalizing The IoT: 4 Things You May Be Missing In Your Strategy | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things (IoT) and its supporting sensors, actuators, and analytics systems have received extraordinary attention recently. At the same time, it has the reignited the age-old debate bet…
Richard Platt's insight:

Here are four critical advantages of having your IT and OT organizations unite forces to realize the full potential of the IoT:
(1) Well-rounded decision making. Every one of your competitors is most likely collecting real-time, heterogeneous information to analyze and support predictions and decision making. However, many of them may not have merged their OT and IT data, leaving them to realize certain insights when it is too late. Connecting operational and business data enables you to gain insight that takes into account costs, resources, and logistics when analyzing the latest market trends and consumer demand. For example, you can see the financial business impact of a decision to delay a maintenance activity.
(2) Secure control systems and all data. The last thing any OT organization needs is a hole in the system infrastructure that allows a hacker or third party to control production equipment. Although not all data generated from the billions of devices available today need to be protected from unauthorized access, IT and OT organizations still need to deal with this new level of risk introduced by the IoT. Extending information to new devices and external systems presents more opportunities for potential breaches that can spell disaster for your bottom line, reputation, and customers. Inserting a process integrator system between OT and IT networks provides an abstraction layer that is read-only and not accessible for write and control rights. This addition safeguards your control and process systems –critical for safe and reliable operations – from a cyberattack.
(3) Reliable governance. To integrate all information consistently and reliably across silos, IT and OT information needs to be consistent. Central governance of data that includes business rules and subject-matter domain expertise can help your business realize the full value of the IoT and the data it generates. Plus, the resulting simplification of the IT landscape can dramatically reduce total cost of ownership.
(4) Protection of existing technology investments. The big payoff when uniting IT and OT systems is that both groups can use what they own while enabling new capabilities. By combining people and tools within IT and OT to deliver decisions and actions with real impact, you can improve the value of your existing technology investments.

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ZTE Launches Axon Lux Smartphone and Axon Watch

ZTE Launches Axon Lux Smartphone and Axon Watch | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A fingerprint scanner is also included in the ZTE Axon Lux alongside an eye-scanner.
Richard Platt's insight:

While this article primarily emphasizes ZTE's new smartphone and smartwatches, it's the  ZTE Spro 2 Smart Projector, which is available in the US via AT&T and Verizon. The device includes "mobile hotspot features" along with an inbuilt 5-inch touchscreen that interests me the most.  We see this as a very interesting and unique device that has the potential to address a lot of the shortfalls in the Home IoT.  Stay tuned on the direction of ZTE they are surprising in their product development.

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New Cisco IoT Certification Fills Employers, Employees Needs

New Cisco IoT Certification Fills Employers, Employees Needs | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The new IoT-focused CCNA Industrial certification is a lab-based training and certification, and is part of the CCNA Industrial Education curriculum.
Richard Platt's insight:

Sudarshan Krishnamurthi, senior manager, product management and marketing at Cisco, says about the creation of the new certification:

“The interest and requests came from employers and individuals working in industrial plants. Technology disruptions in manufacturing and industrial plants have created talent and skill gaps. This gap was at manageable levels when the number of connected devices was few. Now with every single device being connected, the skills gaps have increased and compounded the problem. Employers and individuals working in the plants came to us saying, we need to address this as an industry, and that was the genesis of the curriculum. Since Cisco has a very established program in traditional networking areas, the employers were looking to us to create a similar program for IoT. The main criteria that led to the conclusion that it was time for this cert is the business problem that the customers were facing due to lack of an education curriculum in this area. The job role had evolved, but the skills hadn’t.”

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How ingestible sensors and smart pills will revolutionize healthcare

How ingestible sensors and smart pills will revolutionize healthcare | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Move over wearables, ingestible sensors and smart pills from companies like Proteus Digital Health are changing digital healthcare and patient monitoring.

Via Olivier Gryson, Celine Sportisse, eMedToday, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

Move over wearables and embeddables, because the mobile wireless health revolution is well underway thanks to smart pill technology, also known as “ingestibles.” According to the report “Smart Pills Technologies Market (2012-2017),” the global smart pills market is expected to reach $965 million by the year 2017. The technology development is currently focused on two primary functions: wireless patient monitoring and diagnostic imaging.

Taking snapshots of our systems:   A non-invasive test can be used to remotely visualize the gastrointestinal tract and colon to detect polyps and identify the first signs of colorectal cancer.  Instead of having an invasive colonoscopy procedure. Given Imaging, an Israeli company, has made this possible. The company has developed a battery-powered camera pill that can take high-speed photos of the intestinal tract. The device then sends the images to a second device worn around the patient’s waist and then to a computer or tablet to be reviewed by a doctor.  If swallowing a camera makes you feel squeamish, you might be relieved to learn that it has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The PillCam COLON is intended for patients who have difficulties undergoing standard colonoscopies due to anatomy issues, previous surgery or various colon diseases.  

Disrupting medical monitoring:   Scientists and researchers are working on even more impressive applications of ingestibles. For example, Scripps Health is currently developing nano-sensors that can travel the bloodstream and send messages to a smartphone, alerting the user of signs of infection, an impending heart attack or other cardiovascular issues. It’s clear that these nano-sensors and other smart pill technologies could absolutely change the game when it comes to wireless health.


Expect to see more in this ingestible space, this is only get bigger and better.



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Big Data and Predictive Analytics: Hope or Hype?

Big Data and Predictive Analytics: Hope or Hype? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Predictive analytics is not a new phenomenon. It has been in existence for decades and finally coming of age. Businesses across the globe are looking to use

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Richard Platt's insight:

Types of Business Analytics  

(1) Descriptive Models:  Descriptive models look into customer’s history to often classify prospects into groups and categorize customers by preferences and life stage. Descriptive models can help you uncover reasons for success and failures in the past, ultimately helping you make informed decisions in the present.   

(2) Predictive Models:  Predictive model uses rules and algorithms to help predict a given outcome from specified units. The objective is to assess the likelihood whether a similar unit in a different sample will exhibit exactly same performance. Predictive models often perform calculations during live transactions to evaluate risk or opportunity in order to guide a decision.  

(3) Decision Models:  Decision models describe the relationship between all the elements of a decision to predict the results. This model drives set of business rules to produce preferred action for every customer or circumstance.

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Only 10% of People Possess the Talent to Manage or Lead Effectively

Only 10% of People Possess the Talent to Manage or Lead Effectively | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Many have some of the necessary traits to manage, but few possess the combination of talent that helps teams achieve excellence.
Richard Platt's insight:
  • Managers with high talent are twice as likely to be engaged. In a study of 2,551 managers, Gallup found that 54% of managers with high talent are engaged at work -- twice the percentage of managers with limited talent. This finding has significant implications for organizations that find themselves struggling to break out of mediocrity. Gallup has studied engagement since the 1990s and repeatedly discovered that companies with high levels of engagement outperform others onbusiness outcomes. If organizations can find and hire more managers with high talent, they can likely raise their overall levels of engagement and performance.
  • Managers with high talent are better brand ambassadors. Typically, organizations hold managers responsible for helping employees understand the brand promise and know how to deliver it. But if managers don't know what sets their company apart, there is little chance their employees do. Organizations that hire managers based on talent are more likely to have a strong and effective army of brand ambassadors who understand and live the brand, and who can more successfully engage customers.
  • Managers with high talent are more likely to focus on strengths. Managers with high talent think differently about their jobs and organizations, and they think differently about how to develop their employees. When Gallup asked managers to choose the option that best represented their management approach, 61% of managers with high talent say they take astrengths-based approach, while fewer percentages of managers with functioning or limited talent say the same. Managers with limited talent are more likely than those with high and functioning talent to say they focus equally on employees' strengths and weaknesses.
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How video games are helping Vets with life after the war

How video games are helping Vets with life after the war | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With 22 U.S. war veterans committing suicide every day, Operation Supply Drop is using games to support young vets returning home.
Richard Platt's insight:

Great story / interview with vets using gaming technology.  "Operation Supply Drop": Gaming companies step up and offer those troops far from home battle boredom and fatigue by sending all sorts of games for troops in the field.  


From my professional innovation management pov I believe games are very useful for cognitive behavioral (modification) training - something that deserves more investigation and research to help humans overcome issues and challenges, there is more to this gaming technology that is of benefit for many in our society.

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Why the IoT favors dominance

Why the IoT favors dominance | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Tech developers face huge complexity building applications for connected environments – leading to the reinforcement of power hierarchies
Richard Platt's insight:

One of the factors contributing to the reinforcement of dominant firms and silos is the difficulty of developing and integrating internet of things applications. Functionality in highly distributed, ubiquitous computing environments involves many moving parts coming together in a coordinated, but on-the-fly way.   

Complexity:   Part of this is due to the focus on customisation: accommodating the infinite diversity in what people like, how they interact, and how they use things. In the same way that each of our homes, things and choices are different, we all have different preferences for connectivity, and what we want out of it.

This complexity is compounded by the variety of deployment environments. Take a motion sensor, for example. It might be used in a car, phone, house or any number of other places. As well as the individual user’s preferences about its use, each scenario has different data access concerns, resource requirements (power, connectivity), functional constraints, and other integration needs. Things can be mobile or fixed; always on, or sometimes on. And there’s data – lots of data. All of this needs management.   

Uncertainty and Unpredictability:  To deal with this unpredictability, today’s developers tend towards one of three approaches. The first is to build “closed” systems: X’s sensing home, or Y’s health monitoring system. This is a somewhat old-fashioned, limiting view of the internet of things – where components are built for very specific purposes, and any customisation or management must be designed into the system by the developers themselves. This impacts scalability, limiting the integration of other components.

The second alternative is building things to be part of a particular technical ecosystem, such as a platform like Apple’s HomeKitGoogle’s Nest and Brillo, or AllJoyn by the AllSeen Alliance. These offer developers tools, services and other components – most of which are offered by those who control the ecosystem – to assist in the development and management of the components they build. The downside is that the interoperability regime itself can create network effects and potential lock-in with the big players.

The Path Forward:    So, is there a way out? Perhaps, given the internet of things is still evolving. But the path to countering the strong forces favouring dominance is far from easy.  From a technical standpoint, it is possible to leverage and build upon existing mechanisms for interoperability to achieve a more decentralised internet of things. To incentivise this, what is needed is robust legalethical and commercial recognition that the success of the internet of things depends on users having much greater and more meaningful control over data flows than they have had before, especially when they concern fundamental rights.

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Solidworks for Entrepreneurs Program assists startups with affordable 3D design software

Solidworks for Entrepreneurs Program assists startups with affordable 3D design software | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Dassault Systèmes, specialists in 3D CAD software, has launched the Solidworks for Entrepreneurs Program, giving early-stage businesses low-cost licenses for 3D design apps to aid in industrial design from prototyping through 3D printing. Solidworks apps are…
Richard Platt's insight:

Solidworks apps are used for product design, simulation, publishing, data management and environmental impact assessment. The program is designed to ease the way for cash-strapped hardware startups and incubators worldwide to more quickly complete their designs and bring their products to market.  Now, the program will enable entrepreneurs from around the world to apply for the software.

Applications are available from the company’s program site. The fee is $200, of which 80 percent goes to support the Rwanda High School Girls Scholarship Program that funds education for female students at the ETO Gitarama/Nyanza Technical School.  In addition to providing access to Solidworks software, the program may also offer co-marketing opportunities.

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Will datacentre economics paralyse the IoT?

The statistics predicting what the Internet of Things (IoT) will look like and when it will take shape vary widely. Whether you believe there will be 25 billion or 50 billion Internet-enabled devices by 2050, there will certainly be far more devices than there are today. Forrester has predicted 82% of companies will be using Internet of Things (IoT) applications by 2017. But unless CIOs pay close attention to the economics of the datacentre, they will struggle to be successful. The sheer volume of data we expect to manage across these IoT infrastructures could paralyse companies and their investments in technology.
Richard Platt's insight:

The Value of Information is Relative:  ABI Research has calculated that there will be 16 Zettabytes of data by 2020. Consider this next to another industry estimate that there will be 44 Zettabytes by 2020. While others have said that humanity only produced 2.7 Zettabytes up to 2013. Bottom line: the exponential growth in data is huge.

The natural first instinct for any datacentre manager or CIO is to consider where he or she will put that data. Depending on the industry sector there are regulatory and legal requirements, which mean companies will have to be able to collect, process and analyse runaway amounts of data. By 2019 another estimate suggests that means processing 2 Zettabytes a month!  -  One way to react is to simply buy more hardware. From a database perspective the traditional approach would be to create more clusters in order to manage such huge stores of data. However, a critical element of IoT is that it’s based on low-cost technology, and although the individual pieces of data have a value, there is a limit to that value. For example, you do not need to be told every hour by your talking fridge that you need more milk or be informed by your smart heating system what the temperature is at home. While IoT will lead to smart devices everywhere, its value is relative to the actionable insight it offers.

A key element of the cost benefit equation that needs more consideration is the impact of investment requirements at the backend of an IoT data infrastructure. As the IoT is creating a world of smart devices distributed across networks CIOs have to make a decision about whether the collection, storage and analytics happens locally near the device or is driven to a centralised management system. There could be some logic to keeping the intelligence locally, depending on the application, because it could speed up the process of providing actionable insight. The company could use low-cost, commoditised devices to collect information but it will still become prohibitively expensive if the company has to buy vast numbers of costly database licenses to ensure the system performs efficiently – never mind the cost of integrating data from such a distributed architecture.

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Japanese hotel boasts robotic staff

Japanese hotel boasts robotic staff | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Henn'na Hotel in Japan is garnering worldwide attention for the use of robots as its staff. CBS News correspondent Seth Doane visited the hotel to see what it's like to be greeted and helped by robots.
Richard Platt's insight:

Video - kinda interesting where technology can go, but my take is this kind of approach with robots in the retail world still has a lot more tech. dev to take place before it becomes more common place.

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Apple supplier LG Display to spend nearly $1B on 4th OLED display plant

Apple supplier LG Display to spend nearly $1B on 4th OLED display plant | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
LG Display on Thursday announced plans to devote almost $1 billion towards building a fourth OLED factory, one that could potentially be instrumental in keeping up with demand for products like the Apple Watch.
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When it is fully operational, (expected to be online 1H of 2017) the facility should have double the capacity of the company's present small- to mid-sized OLED line. In the meantime, some large LCD production capacity will be converted to OLED for the sake of cost competitiveness.  -  LG Display is one of Apple's primary LCD panel manufacturers alongside Samsung and Japan Display. Although Apple doesn't officially disclose its supplier connections, LG is believed to be responsible for a number of Mac, iPhone, and iPad displays, and the flexible AMOLED panel on the Apple Watch. - Why is this important to you?  Because LCD technology (OLED and AMOLED) are what those smartphone and smartwatch faces are made out of, it's a key enabling technology of the graphical user interface that everyone takes for granted.

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Car Hacking: What Every Driver Needs to Know

Car Hacking: What Every Driver Needs to Know | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Many new cars are equipped with wireless technology that can make a driver's time on the road more stress-free, but the technology also comes with a dark side.
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Miller works as a security researcher at Twitter, while Valasek is the Director of Security Intelligence at IOActive, an industry leader in comprehensive computer security services.  -  While it may seem like an extreme case, experts say connected car drivers need to be proactive in order to ensure they don't potentially fall victim to a sophisticated hacking attack that could have the potential to cause serious human and physical damage on the road.  -  "In this particular case, [the hackers] have created a zero day exploit that has been undiscovered," Robert Siciliano, an online safety expert to Intel security, told ABC News. "Now, because the researchers are good guys, they have made the car makers aware of it and a patch is in the process of being deployed, but in many cases that will require effort on the part of the consumer."  -  "Rushing to roll out the next big thing, automakers have left cars unlocked to hackers and data-trackers," Blumenthal said in a statement. "This common-sense legislation protects the public against cyber criminals who exploit exciting advances in technology like self-driving and wireless connected cars."

Fiat Chrysler, which manufactures Jeep Cherokees and other cars using the UConnect system, said in a statement the team behind the Cherokee hack had been in communication with the automaker about their work.  -  To the company's knowledge "there has not been a single real world incident of an unlawful or unauthorized remote hack," into any of their vehicles, the statement said.  -  Car owners can enter their vehicle identification number on UConnect's website to find out if they need to download an update.  If an update is needed, car owners can download the update to a USB drive and install it in a vehicle,

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Glenn Wallace's curator insight, July 23, 10:12 AM

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IoT Foundation Critical to Enable Connected Products, Assets, and Supply Chains

IoT Foundation Critical to Enable Connected Products, Assets, and Supply Chains | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
News, Society, Jobs, CityLife
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"Developing a roadmap for IoT and an IoT foundation will ensure that the investments satisfy manufacturers IT and business expectations. IT organizations can and should play an important role in an efficient and agile rollout of IoT across the various use cases in manufacturing." We would argue that understanding the IoT and having an IoT foundation is much bigger than just manufacturing, albeit it is as good as any other industry to focus on.  

The Consulting firm IDC proposes that their PlanScape offers practical guidance to manufacturers on how to move forward with an IoT foundation, and answers the following key questions:

  • Why is IoT and an IoT foundation an important investment for manufacturers?
  • What are the key elements of an IoT foundation?
  • Who are the key stakeholders that should be involved in an IoT foundation and IoT initiatives? What are their roles and responsibilities for promoting successful IoT projects?
  • How can IT and non-IT leaders help accelerate investment in IoT for business value throughout their organization?
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Dell Latitude 12 Rugged Tablet Launches Into 'Big Niche' Among Police, Factories, 'Adventurers'

Dell Latitude 12 Rugged Tablet Launches Into 'Big Niche' Among Police, Factories, 'Adventurers' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
CRN has news for resellers providing businesses with different options in mobility. Stay current with smartphone reviews and the latest on business notebooks, business desktops, thin client devices, tablet computers and more.
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Dell on Tuesday launched its first fully rugged tablet designed for field workers, first responders, the military and other users who take their technology into situations where it may fall, be dropped or get wet and dirty.  -  In the past, rugged products have been cumbersome and hard to work with, Monteros said. But they've come a long way and Monteros sees increased demand on the horizon, especially for technology integrators that work with the public sector, specifically police departments and other first responders.  -  "It's a niche product, but it's a big niche," Stephen Monteros, vice president of business development and strategy at Ontario, Calif.-based Sigmanet, a Dell partner, told CRN. Police departments, especially, "are looking to put more of this stuff out there, and this makes it easier to do that," 

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Motorola says its new Moto Hint Bluetooth earpiece lasts longer and sounds better

The Moto Hint Bluetooth headset, introduced last year alongside the new Moto X, was a tiny and comfortable way to take calls without using your hands. Unfortunately, it failed in one of the most...
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The Moto Hint Bluetooth headset, introduced last year alongside the new Moto X, was a tiny and comfortable way to take calls without using your hands. Unfortunately, it failed in one of the most basic ways possible: it sounded lousy. Now, it seems like Motorola's correcting the missteps it made last year with a new Moto Hint, currently only available at Best Buy. The $129.99 earpiece (down from $149.99 for last year's model) promises improved sound quality as its headlining feature, but it also manages to pack in significantly more battery life — the new Hint is rated for 17 hours of usage as opposed to 10 for the original.

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The Turing Phone is one of the Coolest Android devices you'll see

"We’re walking into the cipher phone age." That's the way Turing Robotics Industries CEO SYL Chao introduces the Turing Phone, an Android smartphone that aims to put security, durability, and...
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“We’re walking into the cipher phone age." That "era" is one in which companies make security, encryption, and safeguarding your data their top priority. "Consumers shouldn't have to worry,"  -  The Turing Phone, an Android smartphone that aims to put security, durability, and fashion above all else. In a myriad of ways, the Turing is anything but your typical phone. There's no headphone jack, and the thing doesn't even have a USB connector. Instead, you charge it with a plug that looks like a clone of Apple's MagSafe.  First off, the device's frame and exterior chrome are made of "liquidmorphium," or liquid metal, which is claimed to be stronger than steel and titanium — and impervious to bending and are unique.  -  The standout feature - Rather than rely on third-parties for authentication and encryption duties, the Turing has it's own built in end-to-end, decentralized authentication scheme that is fully functional offline since it relies on your phone's private key. It is also fully waterproof thanks to a nanocoating that shields its internal components. It can survive dunks in the pool and most submersions without issue. Those internals aren't top of the line, however; the Turing is powered by an aging 2.5GHz Snapdragon 801 chip and features a 5.5-inch, 1080p display that falls short of today's big-brand flagships in terms of sharpness. But Turing Robotics isn't Samsung, and in fairness the screen looked fine.  -  There's no shortage of reasons why this product may fall on its face. Google already has an enormous security team working every day to keep Android safe, and here you're trusting a lesser-known company with protecting some of that data. And then there's the missing headphone jack and weird charging port, two hardware decisions that will almost definitely prove too inconvenient for users.

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