Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Touchscreen WiFi-Enabled Camera for About $150

Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Touchscreen WiFi-Enabled Camera for About $150 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Building your own touchscreen, WiFi-enabled digital camera might seem like the most expensive of photo-related DIY projects, but it doesn't have to be.

Via F. Thunus, Pekka Puhakka
Richard Platt's insight:

Nice to do this for a lot less than the huge amount of $ we used to have to pay for cameras.  Now if they could only get it with better resolution.  I suspect more development work would make this disruptive to all camera tech.  

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Harvard's Michael Porter and PTC CEO Summarize the Impact of IoT on Companies

Harvard's Michael Porter and PTC CEO Summarize the Impact of IoT on Companies | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is changing more than products, it's changing companies' operations and organizational structure too.

Via ManufacturingStories
Richard Platt's insight:

5 Videos explain the different elements that Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter and PTC CEO Jim Heppelmann see with regards to the IoT and it's impact on firms.  Important stuff to comprehend.  For instance: 

Making the Transition: “For many companies, the change from the traditional manufacturing model, to this new world of smart, connected products is a daunting organizational transformation,” says Heppelmann in his fifth video.  Yet there are techniques companies can use to make the transition, he advises. One is to form a cross functional steering committee that oversees a smart, connected products program, or initiative. Another is to form a center of excellence by drafting talent from different parts of the business to develop best practices for the broader organization. Another is the formation of a new business unit so that other business units that can then retain a strong focus on the traditional aspects of the business.

“These are all transition techniques, probably all temporary techniques, on the path to some new normal that could be years down the road by the time a company really masters where they’re going,” concludes Heppelmann 


Definitely review all of the videos

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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 21, 2015 2:04 PM

#IoT #Connected #Devices #SmartDevices

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The U.S. government should be making better use of the internet of things

The U.S. government should be making better use of the internet of things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The U.S. government acknowledges that the Internet of things (IoT) has advanced past the research and development stage. However, even with this acknowledgement, there is still a gap in how the public sector is connecting to the IoT and how it should be connecting.
Richard Platt's insight:

Policy makers, for their part, should be taking steps to update security, data governance, and regulations that enable the swift, full adoption of IoT and associated technology.  However, while some agencies, like NIST, already have established programs in place, IoT adoption among public sector agencies is in the very early stages due to extreme shortages in security, talent and logistics.

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Google Internet of Things Platform Gains Android O Support

Google Internet of Things Platform Gains Android O Support | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Android Things is designed to let developers quickly build IoT products with little of the cost and design work that is otherwise required.
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Google has released the latest developer preview of its Android Things platform for the Internet of Things.  Developer Preview 5 of Android Things is the first version of the platform to use Google's upcoming Android O operating system's code base. It includes new Application Programming Interface (API) features from Android O as well as specific new features for Android Things.  The latest preview version of Android Things also gives developers a look at the new support for technologies such as OpenGL and WebView for the Raspberry Pi 3 that has been integrated into Android Things.  "With Android Things being updated to Android O, significant changes have been made to the platform," Google's developer advocate for IoT Wayne Piekarski said on the company's Android Developer blog.

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Debunking the myth that IoT is only a consumer risk - IoT Agenda

Debunking the myth that IoT is only a consumer risk - IoT Agenda | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
IoT isn't a consumer fad; enterprises also enjoy its benefits. But, ForeScout's Pedro Abreu adds, along with benefits, enterprises must be aware of its risks.
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How to reduce your IoT risk:  Security begins with knowing what’s on your network. In the age of IoT, visibility and control of devices is a must-have, not a nice-to-have. Businesses need a technology that can discover network infrastructure, physical and virtual systems, managed and unmanaged endpoints as well as IoT and rogue devices.  Once businesses have full visibility of what’s on their network, the next step is to control the devices. A viable security product must provide continuous monitoring, be able to immediately determine device behavior, automatically set policies, and understand the context of the network environment and device posture. What’s equally as important is a scalable technology that can work across heterogeneous platforms (on-premises, cloud, data center, etc.) without compromising security as the number of connected devices continues to grow. Only then can an organization achieve a truly comprehensive security stance and keep stealthy hackers at bay.

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IoT hype cycle antidote: Sitting with the engineers

IoT hype cycle antidote: Sitting with the engineers | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Internet of Things CTO Joe Biron explains how to engineer IoT for innovative customers now and in the future.
Richard Platt's insight:

Another piece of intelligent PR, this time by ThingWorx, don't get me wrong, I like what ThingWorx is doing however it is pretty transparent marketing.  IoT is in the Silicon Valley hype cycle vortex. In the vortex, to those who have suspended their disbelief, IoT and its benefits can be bought today with a credit card at Fry’s or the Microcenter. IoT is a development stage technology. People like Biron take account of the problems that have been solved to deliver solutions for innovators now, as well as the hundreds of open problems that will be distilled into a dozen scientific questions that, once answered, will bring IoT to maturity. This is the path of every new technology from research through development and finally maturity.

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Russia unveils new 'invisible' supersonic fighter jets

Russia unveils new 'invisible' supersonic fighter jets | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Russia's £120million Sukhoi-57, which will have a top speed of 1,615 mph, is said to rival America's F-22 and China's Chengdu J-20.
Richard Platt's insight:

Russia has unveiled its new fleet of 'invisible' supersonic fighter jets, boasting that they are already the envy of air forces around the world.  The £120million Sukhoi-57, which will have a top speed of 1,615 mph, is said to rival America's F-22 and China's Chengdu J-20,  Kremlin officials say the fifth-generation stealth jet has been 'christened like a baby after its birth' as Su-57 and will undergo another year of testing before it enters military service in 2019.  In 2015, it was reported that it will be able to fly at a maximum altitude of 20 kilometers with top speeds of 2,600 kilometers per hour.  Russia's state military aviation manufacturer has previously claimed the jet will be cheaper to produce than its US equivalent with units costing less than £120million.  The country's armed forces will receive an initial batch of 12 of the aircraft, Tass reports. 

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3D printing will revolutionize how the Marine Corps fights

3D printing will revolutionize how the Marine Corps fights | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
"The people closest to the problem are also the people closest to the solution," Capt. Chris Wood, co-lead for Additive Manufacturing with the US Marin
Richard Platt's insight:

"The people closest to the problem are also the people closest to the solution," Capt. Chris Wood, co-lead for Additive Manufacturing with the US Marine Corps, told Engadget. In 2016, the USMC put that adage to the test as it launched the Logistics Innovation Challenge, a program "to solicit ideas from Marines, sailors and civilians from across the Marine Corps" that would address challenges that they face in their daily duties. And this is only the start to the US Military's additive-manufacturing aspirations. Pretty soon, everything from ammunition to autonomous vehicles could come from the Corps' cadre of 3D printers.  Of the hundreds of submissions, only a handful managed to make the final cut and enter prototype development. Among them, 26-year-old Corp. Rhet McNeal's Scout, a fixed-wing UAS (unmanned aerial system) constructed almost entirely from 3D-printed components. Conventional Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) drones can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to construct and operate, making commanders more reticent to use these devices in the field out of fear of breaking them.  Scout, on the other hand, costs only around $600 to build. It also fits in a standard-issue pack, can be broken down in a little over two minutes, and assembled and in the air within five minutes, McNeal told Engadget. And because its body and wings are 3D-printed, if the drone does take damage, troops can print a replacement part in a couple hours using in-field 3D printers rather than waiting days, weeks or even months for replacements to worm their way through the Marine Corps' supply lines.

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3 Ways Entrepreneurs Are Making IoT More User-Friendly

3 Ways Entrepreneurs Are Making IoT More User-Friendly | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A growing number of entrepreneurs are creating solutions that make it easier for devices to talk to one another.
Richard Platt's insight:

Many of the current IoT creations are exciting, but their incompatibility with larger platforms means they tend to be seen as gimmicks. Consider smart light-bulbs, a fun technology for the home. To control output based on energy usage, they must connect to a device that monitors function and adapts settings. Otherwise, these light-bulbs become more of conversation pieces than true tools. Creating integrated platforms increases devices' usefulness.  "As demand for IoT technologies grows, entrepreneurs considering IoT solutions should look for ones that might help them achieve a competitive advantage,” Nassar says. “They should also assess their own competencies when rolling out IoT devices and find partners who help fill in the gaps in experience to prevent any bottlenecks or project delays.”

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The ‘Internet of Things’ comes to rural America

The ‘Internet of Things’ comes to rural America | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
I’m sure you’ve heard the term: I - o - T.
Richard Platt's insight:

 if your farm is what we used to call a “rainbow operation” — that is, you have more than one color of equipment on your place — machine-to-machine communications (M2M) is now easier, simpler and faster.  All this IoT stuff is important and game-changing for agriculture.  Tim Marquis is lead of product portfolio for agriculture at Uptake Technologies, a software and analytics company. He says that many groups have started storing and quantifying machine data with the hopes of better understanding ag equipment.  However, he notes, the value of that data has yet to be realized.  “In the end, predictive maintenance, operator and machine scorecards, full vehicle history, retailer maintenance and warranty programs are changing the ag machinery market and driving value back to growers worldwide,” he says.  Here’s the issue for many in rural areas: internet connectivity. In some cases, options are limited and/or quite costly. Sometimes, there are no opportunities to receive broadband service at all.   In 2016, the Federal Communications Commission, reported that nearly 40 percent of rural America lacked access to advanced broadband. By comparison, only 10 percent of the country as a whole lacked access to advanced broadband.Help may be on the way, though.  

This past February, Congressmen Jared Huffman, D-Calif., Mark Pocan, D-Wis., and Rick Nolan, D-Minn., introduced the New Deal Rural Broadband Act of 2017. Based on Roosevelt’s New Deal rural electrification model, the legislation would expand access through increased investments in broadband infrastructure and establish a new Office of Rural Broadband Initiatives to better coordinate all Federal rural broadband deployment programs.  In August 2016, the Connect America Fund, an ongoing program administered by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), offered nearly 700 small, rural local telephone companies throughout the U.S. more than $10 billion in subsidies over 10 years to upgrade their broadband networks. This program targeted more than 821,000 home and business locations in areas served by these rural companies that do not have 10 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload broadband service available currently.

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3D Printing in Aviation at Paris Air Show: Stratasys Among Companies Looking Up in Additive Manufacturing

3D Printing in Aviation at Paris Air Show: Stratasys Among Companies Looking Up in Additive Manufacturing | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
From June 19 to 25, visitors and exhibitors from the aviation industry will gather in Paris for the International Paris Air Show. Among those exhibitors will be Stratasys, which knows a thing or two about aviation.
Richard Platt's insight:

At the air show, Stratasys will present additive manufacturing solutions for the production of FAA- and EASA-certified parts. It’s not the first time the company has taken a spotlight role at the conference; they’ve been involved in 3D printing for aviation for quite some time. Lately, their involvement has gotten even more comprehensive, and they’ll be talking about some of the partnerships that have furthered their presence in the industry, such as that with SIAEC, or SIA Engineering Company. The partnership was recently announced as a means of establishing an Additive Manufacturing Center in Singapore, as well as accelerating the adoption of 3D printing by the aviation industry.

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3D Printing for Airplanes

3D Printing for Airplanes | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Additive manufacturing enters the aviation industry. Siemens is printing its first cabin components for Etihad Airways.
Richard Platt's insight:

Siemens Middle East is now supporting the aircraft parts manufacturer Strata with technological know-how and consulting for the production of monitor shrouds using 3D printing technology. In this process, which is also known as additive manufacturing, components are built up layer by layer (additively) on the basis of 3D design data, using plastics, metals, and other materials.  Strata and Siemens’ collaboration on monitor shrouds is only the beginning. In addition to working together in this area, the two companies are planning to print a metallic outer part for planes. Siemens’ goal is a successful “customer co-creation” process. In other words, by working together, Siemens and Strata intend to become more competitive by gaining a foothold in this innovative market.  In the future, the United Arab Emirates plan to focus more intensely on digital solutions as a third economic pillar alongside oil production and tourism. The state-owned investment fund Mubadala Development Company and Siemens have already signed a memorandum of understanding to work together toward this goal. 

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The Future of Airplanes Is Here, and It's 3D-Printed

The Future of Airplanes Is Here, and It's 3D-Printed | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
3D printing could one day bring down the cost and up the performance of commercial aircraft. It couldn’t happen at a better time.
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Next year, GE Aviation will debut a new propeller plane engine that behaves more like a jet engine — burning significantly less fuel than other models in its class while providing more power. The engine will be doing its thing in an aircraft that carries an entry-level price tag ($4.8 million — a bargain, as planes go). More power, less fuel and cheaper — sounds too good to be true, right? Thank 3D printing, the most disruptive technology to affect manufacturing in recent decades. The possibilities of 3D printing have emboldened GE’s engineers to create all-new engine designs that are ripping up the rulebook. Today, the technology has given us a high-performance, low-cost propeller plane engine. Tomorrow, it could clean up large-scale commercial aviation dramatically.

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Why IoT is a critical part of digital transformation

Why IoT is a critical part of digital transformation | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
With the IoT market growing at a increasingly fast pace, companies need to have a plan of how they will use IoT in their business and how they will protect its data.
Richard Platt's insight:

 "The movement with IoT is you're just putting sensors on everything," Dignan said. "It could be devices, it could be things, it could be tractors, it could be any damn thing you can think of."

Dignan believes IoT is the most important component that comprises digital transformation. It will transform your whole business by changing how you track inventory and your supply chain, giving you more analytical data, and more knowledge.

The best place to see where IoT will be most transformative, though, is in smart cities in areas such as traffic or water supplies, he said.  However, the issue that will come along with collecting more data from sensors will be managing it and deciding which data matters, and which doesn't. Since storage is cheap, companies can keep data lying around.  "I think companies are going to put a lot of sensors in things, and not quite know what to do with [the data]," Dignan said.

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Ben Heck's 'IoT on Wheels'

Ben Heck's 'IoT on Wheels' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Ben and Felix are taking part in element14's IoT on Wheels design challenge with help from a local electrical engineer, Bob Baddeley, to use S
Richard Platt's insight:

Ben and Felix are taking part in element14's IoT on Wheels design challenge with help from a local electrical engineer, Bob Baddeley, to use ST Microelectronic's Nucleo microcontroller board and Bluetooth module. The team decided to work on an Internet-of-Things project for use with a bicycle, perhaps to notify your local council about potholes found in the street. This project required Ben to do some 3D modeling and printing to create the mount, while Felix programmed with mbed to get the microcontroller working as planned. You can enter the IoT on Wheels design challenge, or give the team feedback over on the element14 Community.

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Using IIoT Data To Improve Yield

Using IIoT Data To Improve Yield | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Using Data To Improve Yield Information technology adds big efficiency boost to industrial operations.
Richard Platt's insight:

Chipmakers, board assemblers, and related businesses are turning to the Internet of Things, especially Industrial IoT technology, to reduce defects and grow their bottom lines. They also are utilizing artificial intelligence and predictive maintenance on factory floors.  This may seem like an obvious next step, but the impact is farther reaching than collecting and analyzing data would seem to indicate. By figuring out what goes wrong and being able to actually trace that back to the source of the problem, efficiency can improve by double digits in operations that are already considered highly efficient. Moreover, it can be used to help reshape manufacturing processes and flows, breaking down barriers and silos that made sense in the past but have since become a hindrance.

“This is what the IIoT or Industry 4.0 is supposed to do — improve things and factor in the manufacturing,” 

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LattePanda Internet Of Things Mini PC Now Available To Purchase From $89 (video) 

LattePanda Internet Of Things Mini PC Now Available To Purchase From $89 (video)  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Priced from just $89 the LattePanda comes pre-installed with a full edition of Windows 10, including useful tools such as Visual Studio, NodeJS, Java,
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A new windows 10 mini PC has been launched this week called the LattePanda, specifically designed for Internet of Things projects, robotics and everything else in between.  Priced from just $89 the LattePanda comes pre-installed with a full edition of Windows 10, including useful tools such as Visual Studio, NodeJS, Java, Processing, and more. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about this powerful mini PC and its capabilities.

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Update gone wrong leaves 500 smart locks inoperable

Update gone wrong leaves 500 smart locks inoperable | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Fatal error leaves customers scrambling for fixes that can take a week or longer.
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Hundreds of Internet-connected locks became inoperable last week after a faulty software update caused them to experience a fatal system error, manufacturer LockState said.  The incident is the latest reminder that the so-called Internet of Things—in which locks, thermostats, and other everyday appliances are embedded with small Internet-connected computers—often provide as many annoyances as they do conveniences. Over the past week, the Colorado-based company's Twitter feed has been gorged with comments from customers who were suddenly unable to lock or unlock their doors normally. Complicating the matter: the affected LockState model—the RemoteLock 6i—is included in an Airbnb partnership called Host Assist. That left many hosts unable to remotely control their locks.  Cargile said the company has already resolved the problem for about 85 percent of affected customers.   The failure occurred last Monday when LockState mistakenly sent some 6i lock models a firmware update developed for 7i locks. The update left earlier 6i models unable to be locked and no longer able to receive over-the-air updates. LockState Marketing Manager John Cargile told Ars that the failure hit about 500 locks. The company is offering affected customers one of two options: (1) return the back portion of the lock to LockState so the firmware can be updated, with a turnaround time of about five to seven days, or (2) request a replacement interior lock, with a turnaround time of about 14 to 18 days. In the meantime, customers can use a physical key to unlock doors. (Like most hotel rooms, the doors automatically lock each time they're closed.)

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Singapore becomes IoT-ready as networks are rolled out

Singapore becomes IoT-ready as networks are rolled out | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
THE BUSINESS TIMES Technology - VERY soon the humble electricity meter in your house will be having its own telecom network through which it will be able to connect to a back office and give details about your electricity usage. And your water meter may not be far behind. Both will help you save money by giving you smart information on usage.. Read more at The Business Times.
Richard Platt's insight:

Last week, Singapore Telecommunications (Singtel) and M1 announced the rollout of their respective IoT networks. Earlier in the year, UnaBiz launched its own network with nationwide coverage. StarHub has also announced that it is in the process of rolling out its own network.  Of these four operators, UnaBiz is a newcomer of sorts. Founded in 2016, it is an IoT solutions company which operates in Singapore and Taiwan. UnaBiz has a partnership with SigFox, a French company that builds wireless networks to connect low-energy objects such as electricity meters, smart watches and washing machines, which need to be continuously on and emitting small amounts of data.

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Our Homes May Get Smarter, But Have We Thought It Through?

Our Homes May Get Smarter, But Have We Thought It Through? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
As our houses fill with the Internet of things, sensors will tell us whether we left the stove on or that we're out of paper towels. But critics worry these devices won't be secure and will spy on us.
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"It knows we're home. Doors unlock, [it] kinda sets the mood for the rest of the house too, turns on lights, sets the thermostat accordingly," Essey says.  Essey is an engineer at Uber and an early adopter of the Internet of things. He can control his lights with his Amazon Echo or an array of touchpad sensors he has installed throughout the home. Sensors tell him when there's water in the basement or a leak under the sink.  While Essey's setup might sound a little like science fiction, it's a prototype of the future. Some critics are worried these devices won't be secure and that companies will use them to spy on us to make money.

Gierad Laput, a Ph.D. student at Carnegie Mellon University, says as the Internet of things becomes more ingrained in our daily lives, there are a couple of ways people are turning ordinary homes into smart homes.  "One way is basically to buy all the appliances, smart oven, smart dishwasher, smart microwave, smart toaster, all these things," Laput says.

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Tour de France gets added dimension with data technology boost

Tour de France gets added dimension with data technology boost | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
SINGAPORE – At this year’s Tour de France (TDF), fans could challenge the predictions of each stage’s winners by Dimension Data, an information technology services firm.
The company would tweet its picks at its dedicated TDF handle (@letourdata), before the start of each stage and users would be asked for their opinions. On average, Dimension Data’s predictions were spot on around 60 per cent of the time in the first week.
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At this year’s Tour de France (TDF), fans could challenge the predictions of each stage’s winners by Dimension Data, an information technology services firm.  The company would tweet its picks at its dedicated TDF handle (@letourdata), before the start of each stage and users would be asked for their opinions. On average, Dimension Data’s predictions were spot on around 60 per cent of the time in the first week.  These predictions were made possible by the use of predictive analytics, as part of a new pilot this year between TDF organisers Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO) and Dimension.

The partnership saw machine learning technologies, where computers learn without being explicitly programmed, being introduced to the iconic cycling race, to provide deeper levels of insights as the races unfolded.  The technologies helped to revolutionize the viewing experience for fans, whose demand for real-time statistics has increased in recent years, according to Dimension Data’s Chief Executive Officer for Asia-Pacific, John Lombard.  “We actually have a transponder that sits under every seat of every rider, it’s basically collecting information of that bike, like its speed and positioning, and all of it gets processed at a data centre, which we build every day to support the tour,” he told TODAY in a recent interview at the company’ Singapore office, noting that three billion data points were created and analysed.

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Medical Wearable Devices Get “Squishy”

Medical Wearable Devices Get “Squishy” | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Stretchable electronics will give doctors superhero-like abilities.
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The future has arrived in the form of medical wearable devices. These devices are often comprised of a ridged box of electronics with a battery and some type of adhesive, so that it can attach to the patient’s skin. This close contact can be a problem when you consider that some wearables stay on for long periods of time. Comfort is incredibly important, as anyone who wears a prosthesis could tell you. And trying to mount a stiff silicon chip and hard-bodied battery on a ductile human body, isn’t necessarily comfortable.  So how can we offer PCBs, chips, sensors, and a power source in a comfortable package? Dr.Yonggang Huang, professor of mechanical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, and materials science and engineering at Northwestern University, thinks the answer is to make the electronics as “squishy” as a person.  The ability to 3D print electronics has led to a lot of talk about flexible electronics that use conductive inks on a flexible substrate. However, stretching that substrate adds a new level of complexity. Wires and inks might be able to form and flex without a problem, but they can’t be stretched. Once that challenge is solved, you still have the hard, brittle silicone chip that must be designed in a way so that it doesn’t break. 3D printing can deal with polymers and some metals, but not inorganic semiconductors like Silicon. Therefore 3D printing cannot be used to fabricate electronics (involving lot of inorganic semiconductors). To generate inorganic semiconductors, engineers must work together.  To solve this, “Mechanical and electrical engineers must work together simultaneously,” said Huang. “Normally, an electrical engineer would design a circuit and then have the mechanical engineer design a safe package. But stretchable electronics need to have both engineers working together.” In this case, the circuit and package are the same thing.

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IoT's key feature is the pennies it can pinch

IoT's key feature is the pennies it can pinch | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Not since utility computing became on-demand computing became grid computing became cloud computing has there been more fuss about a technology concept that is 40 years old. The Internet of things, once known
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The “low power” part is the key. New technologies that that can transmit data over long distances using very little radio power. Devices designed from the ground up to eke out every tiny milliwatt, to sleep as much as they can, to strip out every bit of overhead unless it’s absolutely vital.  This is why you can take an LPWAN device, and power it for five or 10 years with just one small battery. You can make a weatherproof device that you can stick under a bridge to monitor stresses, and not have to touch it again for 10 years. You could toss one into a grain hopper. Insert in an animal’s horn. Glue inside a fridge. Tuck inside a light fixture. Wrap around an ignition lead. LPWAN devices can reach a base station five, 10, even 20km away, and whatever you are controlling or monitoring will probably reach its end of life before the IoT device’s battery dies.

Really cheap

That makes deploying IoT technology really, really cheap.

Of these newly minted technologies, the best known are LoRaWAN (long-range WAN) and Sigfox. These two technologies both run in licence-exempt spectrum in the 800MHz band, so they have great signal propagation and penetration characteristics — and don’t attract any licence fees. Another is RPMA from Ingenu, that uses the 2.4GHz band that Wi-Fi uses.  From the point of view of a technology entrepreneur, or hobbyist, or hardware systems developer, LPWAN technology is available in integrated circuits costing less than a dollar, and are easy to work with — any competent electronics technician with basic equipment can build a device that is Internet connected.

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3D printing in the aviation industry

3D printing in the aviation industry | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Aero engineers are turning to additive manufacturing for fast production and better product design. What will this mean for traditional aircraft?
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Thor is not the only example of Airbus’s recent 3D-printed innovations - the company has also used 3D printing to attempt to replicate structures found in nature, and so create parts that are stronger yet lighter than is possible with traditional machining and assembly. “Nature has developed a lot of different design methods,” says Peter Sander, head of emerging technologies and concepts at Airbus.  For one concept part, an air spoiler, Airbus has turned to the giant water lily (Victoria amazonica) - a plant that sports leaves able to support the weight of a small child. A look at the underside of the leaves reveals a structure of various triangles and rectangles with the same skin size all over the surface to reduce weight. The Airbus team analysed the lily’s lightweight structure and the way in which it transfers loads.  (Boeing is suspiciously using BioTRIZ) Such designs can be applied across industries, but are particularly beneficial within aerospace, where reducing weight while maintaining strength are high on the list of priorities. It is an industry that constantly has to worry about fuel costs and will come under increasing pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Each kilogram shaved off the total weight pays for itself time and again in terms of fuel savings over the aircraft’s service life.  Tom Edwards, North American president of engineering design business Cyient, says: “Weight reduction is vital in aerospace. With greater efficiency and reduction in fuel usage high on the agenda, every gram of weight saved counts.”

In recent years, the market for additive manufacturing has expanded, with many industries, including aerospace, adopting additive methods for creative product design and prototyping. As Edwards points out, additive manufacturing is now one of the fastest-growing production markets. “The global market is expected to increase from a 2013 revenue figure of $3.07bn to $12.8bn by 2018, and exceeding $21bn by 2020,” he says. The flight business is already a significant user: “Aerospace and defence production and maintenance, repair and overhaul applications currently account for around 15 per cent of the additive manufacturing global market,” he adds.

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As Boeing Goes, So Goes the Stock Market

As Boeing Goes, So Goes the Stock Market | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
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While investors have been piling into high-tech growth stocks, the giant commercial aircraft manufacturer and defense contractor has quietly emerged as the best-performing stock in the Dow. This week its shares rose above $240, and they’ve gained 50 percent this year.  That’s way ahead of second-place Apple, which is up about 36 percent.And it’s better than Netflix, which is up 37 percent.  When it comes to valuation, there’s only one thing stock investors really care about, which is earnings. And the broad economic forces driving Boeing’s gains are lifting the earnings at many large multinational companies, which is in turn driving the major stock indexes to new heights.  Boeing had Wall Street analysts scrambling to upgrade their recommendations late last month after it reported $2.5 billion in earnings for the second quarter and raised estimates for future earnings and cash flow. The company reported an order backlog that totaled 5,700 aircraft, or about seven full years of deliveries. That will lock in profits and cash flow for years to come.

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Big wave of artificial intelligence and machine learning coming to healthcare, University Hospitals of Cleveland CEO says

Big wave of artificial intelligence and machine learning coming to healthcare, University Hospitals of Cleveland CEO says | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Thomas Zenty suggests those once-futuristic technologies are now closer than many realize. And it’s only a matter of time before Amazon Alexa and Apple Siri come to a hospital near you.
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As hospitals and health systems leverage information technology, healthcare executives must advocate for caregivers to improve provider satisfaction, be prepared for a telehealth explosion, embrace machine learning and artificial intelligence, incorporate the Internet of Things, and prepare for more cyber-attacks, said Thomas Zenty, CEO of University Hospitals of Cleveland. Zenty delivered today’s keynote address at Allscripts Client Experience, the EHR vendor’s user conference here. 

The wellness of providers, the degree to which they are satisfied with their jobs, is key to operating a hospital or health system. 

“Physician satisfaction is at an all-time low,” Zenty said. “The things we now have to do with our EHRs. We have to do more work at home than ever before. The promises of efficiencies and effectiveness and time savings are not being realized. So we have to advocate for our caregivers. Do everything we can for those physicians and other caregivers.”  Collection, aggregation and interpretation of data is critically important, Zenty added. But provider wellness cannot be overlooked. “We can’t just assume because we have an EHR it’s going to be automatically adopted,” he said.

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