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Best of 2013: New Form of Carbon is Stronger Than Graphene and Diamond | MIT Technology Review

Best of 2013: New Form of Carbon is Stronger Than Graphene and Diamond | MIT Technology Review | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In August, the blog revealed that chains of double or triple-bonded carbon atoms, known as carbyne, should be stronger and stiffer than any known material.
Richard Platt's insight:

Better than graphene? ? Well you had better read on if you know why graphene is important and why this may be even better, known as carbyne, should be stronger and stiffer than any known material.

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Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution

Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things transformation will have a big impact on the service and maintenance industries. Here are 4 ways service leaders must adapt.
Richard Platt's insight:

Porter, along with Jim Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC, summarized their findings from a November 2014 HBR article about how the Internet of Things (IoT) is disrupting various industries, field service included. The pair also spoke about ongoing research on the implications for company strategy and organization, which will be published in HBR later this year.

“Not only is the product changing, the product change is feeding back and changing how companies operate today,” Porter said. “How you run a company is going to change much more dramatically than in previous generations of IT.” 

1. Service businesses will shift from reactive to proactive:  There will be a transformation in the way service businesses are run and organized, as connected products allow technicians to diagnose the problem, or even perform service, remotely. Companies will be able to push updates to products in the field, and analyze product usage data to improve service efficiency and warranty management. As new IoT-enabled technologies take hold, service companies will move beyond the repair model to data-enabled advanced services that add value to customers. Ultimately, Porter said, this model will evolve to “product-as-a-service” as companies design new functionality and extend product life cycles. 

2. Big data will create an entirely new section of the value chain:    Companies will find ways to create value from the constant data stream from both internal and external factors. (Internal data could be product usage and equipment performance information, while external data could include weather conditions.)  Porter and Heppelmann said that, rather than having each division deal with its own data separately, companies need to create a “unified data group,” led by a chief data officer, that can store, aggregate and analyze the data — and work closely with other divisions to uncover insights that create customer value.

3. Product design will require a long-term, integrative approach:  Product design will become “evergreen,” said Porter, meaning products will be continuously re-designed and serviced via remote connections and services once they’re in the field. As a result, companies must find a new approach to product design that accounts for everything that happens after the sale is closed.  In addition, increased connectivity will require manufacturers to look at products within a larger, networked system. A “smart” tractor, for example, will have its own data analytics connections, but it must also interface with other smart machines on the farm.

4. Expect more consolidation and a war for talent: Porter frames the changes led by the IoT as an opportunity for companies to broaden their offerings and lead with innovative product functionality. There are two choices: cling to business as usual, or adapt. Companies that don’t react will have their products subsumed by companies that do. Porter predicts this will lead to further consolidation across industries, allowing companies to expand their market and products through data and IoT functionality. - But the biggest hurdle, Porter said, is likely to be the war for talent. There are currently too few people with the necessary mix of skills to tackle the new challenges presented by the IoT era.



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Frank Boross's curator insight, June 24, 6:52 PM

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a scenario in which objects, animals or even people are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction. IoT has evolved from the convergence of wireless technologies, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and the Internet.

 

Evergreen design will change how we work in facilities management. After-sales or "service" data will become critical. A "smart" machine, for example a floor scrubber, will have its own data analytics connections for servicing, but it must also interface with other smart machines used in the building. This opens up all kinds of possibilities in facilities management. 

http://www.scoop.itantonioormachea's curator insight, August 1, 9:55 AM

Porter, along with Jim Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC, summarized their findings from a November 2014 HBR article about how the Internet of Things (IoT) is disrupting various industries, field service included. The pair also spoke about ongoing research on the implications for company strategy and organization, which will be published in HBR later this year.

“Not only is the product changing, the product change is feeding back and changing how companies operate today,” Porter said. “How you run a company is going to change much more dramatically than in previous generations of IT.” 

1. Service businesses will shift from reactive to proactive:  There will be a transformation in the way service businesses are run and organized, as connected products allow technicians to diagnose the problem, or even perform service, remotely. Companies will be able to push updates to products in the field, and analyze product usage data to improve service efficiency and warranty management. As new IoT-enabled technologies take hold, service companies will move beyond the repair model to data-enabled advanced services that add value to customers. Ultimately, Porter said, this model will evolve to “product-as-a-service” as companies design new functionality and extend product life cycles. 

2. Big data will create an entirely new section of the value chain:    Companies will find ways to create value from the constant data stream from both internal and external factors. (Internal data could be product usage and equipment performance information, while external data could include weather conditions.)  Porter and Heppelmann said that, rather than having each division deal with its own data separately, companies need to create a “unified data group,” led by a chief data officer, that can store, aggregate and analyze the data — and work closely with other divisions to uncover insights that create customer value.

3. Product design will require a long-term, integrative approach:  Product design will become “evergreen,” said Porter, meaning products will be continuously re-designed and serviced via remote connections and services once they’re in the field. As a result, companies must find a new approach to product design that accounts for everything that happens after the sale is closed.  In addition, increased connectivity will require manufacturers to look at products within a larger, networked system. A “smart” tractor, for example, will have its own data analytics connections, but it must also interface with other smart machines on the farm.

4. Expect more consolidation and a war for talent: Porter frames the changes led by the IoT as an opportunity for companies to broaden their offerings and lead with innovative product functionality. There are two choices: cling to business as usual, or adapt. Companies that don’t react will have their products subsumed by companies that do. Porter predicts this will lead to further consolidation across industries, allowing companies to expand their market and products through data and IoT functionality. - But the biggest hurdle, Porter said, is likely to be the war for talent. There are currently too few people with the necessary mix of skills to tackle the new challenges presented by the IoT era.



http://www.scoop.itantonioormachea's curator insight, August 1, 10:24 PM

Porter, along with Jim Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC, summarized their findings from a November 2014 HBR article about how the Internet of Things (IoT) is disrupting various industries, field service included. The pair also spoke about ongoing research on the implications for company strategy and organization, which will be published in HBR later this year.

“Not only is the product changing, the product change is feeding back and changing how companies operate today,” Porter said. “How you run a company is going to change much more dramatically than in previous generations of IT.” 

1. Service businesses will shift from reactive to proactive:  There will be a transformation in the way service businesses are run and organized, as connected products allow technicians to diagnose the problem, or even perform service, remotely. Companies will be able to push updates to products in the field, and analyze product usage data to improve service efficiency and warranty management. As new IoT-enabled technologies take hold, service companies will move beyond the repair model to data-enabled advanced services that add value to customers. Ultimately, Porter said, this model will evolve to “product-as-a-service” as companies design new functionality and extend product life cycles. 

2. Big data will create an entirely new section of the value chain:    Companies will find ways to create value from the constant data stream from both internal and external factors. (Internal data could be product usage and equipment performance information, while external data could include weather conditions.)  Porter and Heppelmann said that, rather than having each division deal with its own data separately, companies need to create a “unified data group,” led by a chief data officer, that can store, aggregate and analyze the data — and work closely with other divisions to uncover insights that create customer value.

3. Product design will require a long-term, integrative approach:  Product design will become “evergreen,” said Porter, meaning products will be continuously re-designed and serviced via remote connections and services once they’re in the field. As a result, companies must find a new approach to product design that accounts for everything that happens after the sale is closed.  In addition, increased connectivity will require manufacturers to look at products within a larger, networked system. A “smart” tractor, for example, will have its own data analytics connections, but it must also interface with other smart machines on the farm.

4. Expect more consolidation and a war for talent: Porter frames the changes led by the IoT as an opportunity for companies to broaden their offerings and lead with innovative product functionality. There are two choices: cling to business as usual, or adapt. Companies that don’t react will have their products subsumed by companies that do. Porter predicts this will lead to further consolidation across industries, allowing companies to expand their market and products through data and IoT functionality. - But the biggest hurdle, Porter said, is likely to be the war for talent. There are currently too few people with the necessary mix of skills to tackle the new challenges presented by the IoT era.



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FDA tells hospitals to ditch IV pumps that can be hacked remotely

FDA tells hospitals to ditch IV pumps that can be hacked remotely | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
According to the FDA, if hospital network security isn't up to date or these old devices are in use, hackers could do more than just steal patient info -- they could remotely control a "smart" IV infusion pump and hurt patients.
Richard Platt's insight:

The network vulnerability would "allow an unauthorized user to control the device and change the dosage the pump delivers, which could lead to over- or under-infusion of critical patient therapies," the Food and Drug Administration "strongly encourages" hospitals to stop using Hospira's Symbiq Infusion System, because it's vulnerable to cyberattacks that would allow a third party to remotely control dosages delivered via the computerized pumps. Unauthorized users are able to access the Symbiq system through connected hospital networks, according to the FDA and the Department of Homeland Security's Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team. ICS-CERT reported the vulnerability on July 21st and the FDA released its own safety alert on Friday, July 31st. Thankfully, there are no reported incidences of the Symbiq system being hacked.

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The inventor who may kill the power cord

The inventor who may kill the power cord | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Meredith Perry is working on a technology that would allow us to walk into any uBeam-equipped room and find that our electronic devices immediately begin charging, writes Marco della Cava in Change Agents.

Via Josepf J Haslam
Richard Platt's insight:

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."

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http://www.scoop.itantonioormachea's curator insight, August 1, 9:54 AM

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."

http://www.scoop.itantonioormachea's curator insight, August 1, 9:55 AM

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."

Arturo Gil Mendoza's curator insight, August 1, 9:19 PM

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."

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The IoT Is About Data, Not Things

The IoT Is About Data, Not Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Companies today are grappling with the Internet of Things (IoT), a large network of physical devices that extends beyond the typical computer networks, encompassing devices, industrial equipment, sensors, and extended products. For some manufacturers everything they build could feed into IoT, from cars to buildings or even consumer products. While [...]
Richard Platt's insight:

Where This Leaves Us:  As businesses begin to sit down with the purveyors of IoT solutions, be it companies like Dell or Hewlett-Packard on the systems side, Cisco Systems or Intel on the networks and gateways, or companies like Tableau Software Inc. or SAP SE for the analytics, it is important to think through the real aspects of what you are trying to accomplish and how you plan to use the data. With multiple handoff points you’ll need to ensure that you are securing and maintaining consistency of that data for a clean chain-of-custody on the information. Finally, don’t just view IoT as the means to an end for near-term decision making. Keep in mind that the data being generated may need to live for long periods of time, and your corporate data handling and data retention policies may need to be aligned to the new reality of this type of data, because it is a whole new world in IoT and the data old rules may not cleanly apply.

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IoT Manufacturer Survey Cites Key Trends You Should Know

IoT Manufacturer Survey Cites Key Trends You Should Know | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A recent article by Forbes, “Where Internet of Things Initiatives Are Driving Revenue Now” offers several insights from a recent IoT Global Trend Study performed by Tata Consulting Services. The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways: Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018. 47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies. Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives: Product monitoring (31.1%) Customer monitoring (26.6%) Supply chain monitoring (23.2%) Premises monitoring (19%) Top two areas where business models...
Richard Platt's insight:

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

  • Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.
  • 47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.
  • Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:
    • Product monitoring (31.1%)
    • Customer monitoring (26.6%)
    • Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)
    • Premises monitoring (19%)
  • Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:
    • Increasing the service business (40%)
    • Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)
  • By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:
    • Increase the services business (40.3%)
    • Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)
    • Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
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Fernando Alcantara's curator insight, July 31, 6:47 AM

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:Product monitoring (31.1%)Customer monitoring (26.6%)Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)Premises monitoring (19%)Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:Increasing the service business (40%)Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:Increase the services business (40.3%)Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
Jean-Marc Menat's curator insight, August 1, 7:51 AM

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

  • Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.
  • 47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.
  • Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:
    • Product monitoring (31.1%)
    • Customer monitoring (26.6%)
    • Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)
    • Premises monitoring (19%)
  • Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:
    • Increasing the service business (40%)
    • Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)
  • By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:
    • Increase the services business (40.3%)
    • Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)
    • Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
Jean-Marc Menat's curator insight, August 1, 7:55 AM

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

  • Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.
  • 47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.
  • Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:
    • Product monitoring (31.1%)
    • Customer monitoring (26.6%)
    • Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)
    • Premises monitoring (19%)
  • Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:
    • Increasing the service business (40%)
    • Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)
  • By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:
    • Increase the services business (40.3%)
    • Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)
    • Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
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How The Industrial Sector Will Drive Massive Growth To The IoT

How The Industrial Sector Will Drive Massive Growth To The IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The focus for Internet of Things growth may be on houses and cars, but the industrial sector will truly lead the way.
Richard Platt's insight:

A recently released white paper by American Industrial Systems, cited by Automation World, said that smart cities, smart factories and smart buildings were no longer a “vague futuristic concept,” and predicted that worldwide industrial Internet spending could reach $500 billion by the end of the decade. This is not an unreasonable expectation, especially when taking into account how integral software and digital services have become in modern production facilities.  -  So is the ballyhoo over the Internet of Things justified? The answer, it would appear, is yes.  Juniper’s report is just the latest in a series of studies that all point to one thing … the Internet of Things is no longer hype. This should not come as a surprise to anyone who understands how vital the Internet of Things is to the evolution of the Internet as a whole. In fact, a research report released by the McKinsey Global Institute said that the true value of the Internet of Things is actually being undersold.


The flow of dollars into IoT was born out in a global trend study of enterprises conducted by Tata Consultancy Services and cited by Forbes. About 79% percent of executive-level respondents to Tata’s “Internet of Things: The Complete Reimaginative Force” said that they already have initiatives in place to understand products, supply chains and customers, with 45% of them using the Internet of Things to monitor production and distribution. These initiatives, the report said, will increase manufacturing revenue by an average of 27.1% within the next three years, with North America and the Asia-Pacific region—once again—leading the charge.  -  The Tata study also highlighted a significant trend in terms of spending. Out of the 795 global companies—limited to enterprises with average annual revenue of $22 billion—interviewed for the report, 26 expected to spend at least one billion dollars on Internet of Things projects this year alone, while average spend of the others ranged between $41.20 million (consumer packaged goods) to $128.87 million (travel, transportation and hospitality), with the average overall spend rounding out at around $86 million.

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massimo facchinetti's curator insight, July 30, 5:35 PM

A recently released white paper by American Industrial Systems, cited by Automation World, said that smart cities, smart factories and smart buildings were no longer a “vague futuristic concept,” and predicted that worldwide industrial Internet spending could reach $500 billion by the end of the decade. This is not an unreasonable expectation, especially when taking into account how integral software and digital services have become in modern production facilities.  -  So is the ballyhoo over the Internet of Things justified? The answer, it would appear, is yes.  Juniper’s report is just the latest in a series of studies that all point to one thing … the Internet of Things is no longer hype. This should not come as a surprise to anyone who understands how vital the Internet of Things is to the evolution of the Internet as a whole. In fact, a research report released by the McKinsey Global Institute said that the true value of the Internet of Things is actually being undersold.


The flow of dollars into IoT was born out in a global trend study of enterprises conducted by Tata Consultancy Services and cited by Forbes. About 79% percent of executive-level respondents to Tata’s “Internet of Things: The Complete Reimaginative Force” said that they already have initiatives in place to understand products, supply chains and customers, with 45% of them using the Internet of Things to monitor production and distribution. These initiatives, the report said, will increase manufacturing revenue by an average of 27.1% within the next three years, with North America and the Asia-Pacific region—once again—leading the charge.  -  The Tata study also highlighted a significant trend in terms of spending. Out of the 795 global companies—limited to enterprises with average annual revenue of $22 billion—interviewed for the report, 26 expected to spend at least one billion dollars on Internet of Things projects this year alone, while average spend of the others ranged between $41.20 million (consumer packaged goods) to $128.87 million (travel, transportation and hospitality), with the average overall spend rounding out at around $86 million.

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Enterprise 3D Printing Ecosystem

Enterprise 3D Printing Ecosystem | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Overview3D Printing has been growing by leaps and bounds in the recent years. Rooted in pre-prototyping, advances in 3D printers, materials, and processes now enable the creation of many artifacts when and where needed. 3D Printing enables mass personalization and mass serialization, considered to be a game changer, and poised to affect and disrupt multiple industries. Therefore, it is highly probable that in the near future we’ll witness large-scale implementation of 3D printing across industries. Enterprise use of 3D printing involves deployment of a large number of 3D printers, acros
Richard Platt's insight:

 3D Printing enables mass personalization and mass serialization, considered to be a game changer, and poised to affect and disrupt multiple industries. Therefore, it is highly probable that in the near future we’ll witness large-scale implementation of 3D printing across industries. Enterprise use of 3D printing involves deployment of a large number of 3D printers, across diverse locations, along with the plurality of technologies, materials, and processes. Managing such environment will be challenging.  Effective and large-scale enterprise applications of 3D printing will require special considerations beyond printing technologies and materials.  Excellent assessment.

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Google’s New, Simplified Patent Search Now Integrates Prior Art And Google Scholar

Google’s New, Simplified Patent Search Now Integrates Prior Art And Google Scholar | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Google has been a significant player in many facets of the patent world -- as a creator, critic, litigator, buyer and big data indexer. Today, it's taking..

Via Kenneth Carnesi
Richard Platt's insight:

In an area of technology often flooded with arcane writing, irrelevant information, blue smoke and mirrors, and a lot of patents (600,000 applications filed in 2014 alone, according to Google’s deputy general council Allen Lo and patent engineer Ian Wetherbee), Google’s main theme here is simplicity, both in terms of functionality and user interface.  -  The idea is that the new patent search will be easier to use both by experts in the field as well as the general public to look for patents and related materials. Given the rising interest in safeguarding IP among developers and founders who may have never had to consider patents much before, this could prove to be especially useful.


The updates today cover three main areas:

(1) Single search interface, where Google will integrate both searches for patents as well as prior art — the latter being one of the main ways that people will search for whether an idea has been patented or represented before. While many patent searches (including on the USPTO’s own site) require people to know how to “read” patents to create the right search string to find what they are looking for. Google has instead divided up the process into different fields that are more like those that a user might come across in advanced searches on other sites.

(2)  Google is incorporating another visual tool into the patent search by way of Google Scholar, its vertical search focused on academic research and other scholarly literature.  Now, Google says it has indexed the whole of its Google Scholar database using CPC Classifications. CPC stands for Cooperative Patent Classifications and was jointly developed across the U.S. and Europe to better standardise how patents and patent-related information is described.

(3)  Google is rethinking its bigger mission in big-data search. Google says that now it will be presenting results in clusters, logical groups that will make it easier to look at results around themes.


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graham j. passmore's curator insight, July 31, 3:05 AM

In an area of technology often flooded with arcane writing, irrelevant information, blue smoke and mirrors, and a lot of patents (600,000 applications filed in 2014 alone, according to Google’s deputy general council Allen Lo and patent engineer Ian Wetherbee), Google’s main theme here is simplicity, both in terms of functionality and user interface.  -  The idea is that the new patent search will be easier to use both by experts in the field as well as the general public to look for patents and related materials. Given the rising interest in safeguarding IP among developers and founders who may have never had to consider patents much before, this could prove to be especially useful.


The updates today cover three main areas:

(1) Single search interface, where Google will integrate both searches for patents as well as prior art — the latter being one of the main ways that people will search for whether an idea has been patented or represented before. While many patent searches (including on the USPTO’s own site) require people to know how to “read” patents to create the right search string to find what they are looking for. Google has instead divided up the process into different fields that are more like those that a user might come across in advanced searches on other sites.

(2)  Google is incorporating another visual tool into the patent search by way of Google Scholar, its vertical search focused on academic research and other scholarly literature.  Now, Google says it has indexed the whole of its Google Scholar database using CPC Classifications. CPC stands for Cooperative Patent Classifications and was jointly developed across the U.S. and Europe to better standardise how patents and patent-related information is described.

(3)  Google is rethinking its bigger mission in big-data search. Google says that now it will be presenting results in clusters, logical groups that will make it easier to look at results around themes.


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The Artificial Intelligence AK-47 is coming

The Artificial Intelligence AK-47 is coming | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Despite Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking leading a creditable charge for a global autonomous weapons ban, a cheap, replicable AI weapon is inevitable.
Richard Platt's insight:

Actually not a new argument against AI becoming weaponized, think about the "Terminator" film series, with it's ubiquitous SkyNet.  Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking, Steve Wozniak, and many others all chiming in on the point that an weaponized AI race between nations is not in the best interests of humanity.  (duh)  - Nonetheless just because they and the rest of humanity do not want this to happen, doesn't mean it isn't going to happen. Self interested, power hungry nations and terrorist groups will in fact attempt to do this, do not be dissuaded from any of the political mouthpieces that say otherwise.  This is already a reality in the making, and I do know that for a fact (and no I won't go into how or why I know this).  Not to scare anyone, but to make them aware that this is already happening, and that an informed perspective is the first defense against the stupidity of those who would seek to threaten free human beings.  There will definitely need to be more debate required on this evolution of technology and it's use, as well as how to mitigate the threat of it.

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IBeacon helps visually impaired students find their way around Penn State campus

IBeacon helps visually impaired students find their way around Penn State campus | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Getting lost on campus is a grand tradition, a collegiate rite of passage to which even the best and the brightest in State College eventually succumb — with the possible exception of Madeline Garber.


Via Jesús Hernández
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Madeline Garber (blind student) at the Summer Academy for Students who are Blind or Visually held a demonstration of the iBeacon, a low-energy Bluetooth device that can provide students — blind and sighted alike — with a better sense of orientation indoors.  -  The demonstration began in Atherton Hall, where Garber — cane and iPhone in hand — traveled across several pathways and busy roads to the cafeteria at Pollock Commons.  Outdoors, she was guided by an app called Blind Square, which tells users where they are, where they are going or what is surrounding them — whether it be a potential obstacle or a Panera Bread.  Garber wore specially designed headphones that allowed her to clearly hear the instructions coming from her iOS device without completely stifling the sounds of the world around her.  “I feel that I can be a lot more independent while using it,” Garber said.  The GPS-driven Blind Square works best outdoors, but once inside it requires the enhancement of the iBeacon, a small Bluetooth device that can transform abstract space into navigable terrain.  Doug Williams, an educational consultant with PaTTAN, placed 13 iBeacons throughout campus, one outside of Atherton Hall and the other 12 inside the Pollock Dining Commons.

For the purpose of the demonstration, Williams and his team installed the iBeacons inside the dining hall after hours, placing units resembling ant traps under food stations, near the dishwasher and even in the kitchen.


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'Future Crimes': A sober warning about the IoT

'Future Crimes': A sober warning about the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
If you’re trying to decide whether to bring your e-reader or a hardback on vacation, Marc Goodman’s new tome “Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It” could help. By the middle of the first chapter you’ll be afraid to turn on your e-reader or laptop, and you’ll be looking with deep suspicion at your smartphone. Keep going, and you’ll be nervously eyeing your desktop, refrigerator and car. "FUTURE CRIMES: EVERYTHING IS CONNECTED, EVERYONE IS VULNERABLE AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT" By Marc Goodman Doubleday ($27.95). Why the anxiety? Because, as Mr. Goodman gets around to summarizing, “We no longer live life through our own innate primary human sensory abilities. Rather, we experience it mediated through screens,” and increasingly through
Richard Platt's insight:

“Future Crimes” is at its most foreboding when it catalogues the vulnerabilities in the blossoming Internet of Things. Everything north of your cat’s litter box will soon be connected to the web and controlled using smartphone apps. “So what could possibly go wrong?”author Mr. Goodman asks.   The focus of the book, though, is solidly on the darkweb / underworld.  -  Mr. Goodman’s background includes law enforcement and technology, starting with the Los Angeles Police Department and running through the FBI, and now as chair for policy, law and ethics at Silicon Valley’s Singularity University, a think tank and business incubator.  -  He’s prowled the online bazaars of the Deep Web, e-places with names such as Silk Road and the Dark Market. There everything from stolen identifications to drugs, guns and child pornography are hawked between anonymous parties who pay using cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.  


Mr. Goodman doesn’t stop with the IoT, but storms ahead into the criminal potential opened up by emerging robotics, nanotechnology and biotech. There he becomes most speculative and fascinating, as we are forced to contemplate a world in which the domestic terrorist or deranged outcast can ditch the gun in favor of made-to-order bacteria.  Mr. Goodman argues convincingly that we are addressing exponential growth in risky technologies with thinking that is, at best, incremental. His mantra is not that new stuff is bad, but that unexamined, unquestioning adoption of technology leads to a survival-of-the-sneakiest future.


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IoT will 'aggravate' data privacy compliance problems, Ofcom-commissioned study finds

IoT will 'aggravate' data privacy compliance problems, Ofcom-commissioned study finds | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
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In its report on personal data and privacy (199-page / 1.26MB PDF), WIK-Consult said there is "no single solution" to address that "dissonance", and said the problem could get worse as more devices are connected with one another and data flows more freely in the so-called 'internet of things' (IoT).  "Although data flows in the IoT do not differ fundamentally from the data flows observed in any connected environment, the sheer increase in the number of connected devices multiplies the data that becomes accessible and analysable," WIK-Consult said. "If expectations about the take-up of such connected devices are correct, online tracking of personal data is likely to become seamless across all areas of people’s lives."  -  "Besides the increase in the amount of data, one may also expect that data gathering, aggregation and analysis will become even more subtle as machines talk to machines without (almost) any human intervention. Thus, consumers have even less opportunity to learn about data-gathering practices. In some cases, they may not even be aware that the device they are currently using is actually connected to the internet," it said. "Consequently, it is likely that the evolution towards the IoT will aggravate the issues outlined … for the status quo of connectivity."   -  WIK-Consult said that an increasing number of, and more complex, "contractual relationships" are likely to emerge as the IoT develops, which will reflect the increasing connectivity of devices and data flows. This is likely to mean that privacy policies will "become even longer and more difficult to understand"

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Big Data and Predictive Analytics: Hope or Hype?

Big Data and Predictive Analytics: Hope or Hype? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Predictive analytics is not a new phenomenon. It has been in existence for decades and finally coming of age. Businesses across the globe are looking to use

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Types of Business Analytics  

(1) Descriptive Models:  Descriptive models look into customer’s history to often classify prospects into groups and categorize customers by preferences and life stage. Descriptive models can help you uncover reasons for success and failures in the past, ultimately helping you make informed decisions in the present.   

(2) Predictive Models:  Predictive model uses rules and algorithms to help predict a given outcome from specified units. The objective is to assess the likelihood whether a similar unit in a different sample will exhibit exactly same performance. Predictive models often perform calculations during live transactions to evaluate risk or opportunity in order to guide a decision.  

(3) Decision Models:  Decision models describe the relationship between all the elements of a decision to predict the results. This model drives set of business rules to produce preferred action for every customer or circumstance.

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Stop hiring data scientists until you’re ready for data science

Stop hiring data scientists until you’re ready for data science | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
If you thought you were ready for data science but you're not, don't put your new data science hire into a different role or block them as they keep trying to be successful. Be honest and let them go.
Richard Platt's insight:

This same list goes for hiring Professional Innovation Managers we use descriptive, prescriptive and diagnostic models to evaluate opportunities and challenges to innovating and enabling the firm to be competitive. 


Tips on letting that brilliant HR data scientist you hired be one of your most brilliant hires:

1. Assign reporting to someone else. It’s a very important task, but it doesn’t require a data scientist. Reporting will quickly bore them to tears and they’ll resign.

2. Don’t block them from talking directly to your business areas. I often hear they have to go through the HR Business Partner who protects the business leader and blocks them from access. Working with the HR Business Partner of course makes sense. Being blocked by the HR Business Partner doesn’t.

3. Task HR Business Partners with finding either high turnover roles or low performance roles that your data scientist can work to help with.

4. Have them focus first on solving business challenges (like Financial Advisor turnover) not HR challenges like compliance issues. This will give visibility to the great work they do and introduce HR’s new expertise to solving business challenges that affect the bottom line.

5. When they complete an analytics project, give them a chance to talk and present the results, regardless of the outcomes. Did it help or not help? Don’t keep the results inside of HR.

6. Admit that you’re a little nervous about what they do. They’re nervous about what you do too.

7. Trust your data scientist. Stop being scared. You hired them because they have an area of expertise traditional HR doesn’t. Embrace their area of expertise. You need to trust their advice and approach, or, yes, they’ll leave.


“Anyone can hire a data scientist. Not every HR department or organization is ready for data science. Generating reports are not analytics — even if they’re prettier or faster reports. Dashboards are not analytics — even if they’re really pretty dashboards. More than anyone, HR should understand the devastating impact of changing job description on someone that’s been hired.”  -  Ironically, that data scientist hire is perhaps one of the most brilliant and strategic hires that HR department has ever made — perhaps ever. But only if they let her do what she was hired to do. HR data scientists can help move HR from being tactical to strategic, using an analytics approach to highlight never seen before patterns, make decisions based on data, and the like.


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Frank Weaver's curator insight, August 1, 6:40 PM

This same list goes for hiring Professional Innovation Managers we use descriptive, prescriptive and diagnostic models to evaluate opportunities and challenges to innovating and enabling the firm to be competitive. 


Tips on letting that brilliant HR data scientist you hired be one of your most brilliant hires:

1. Assign reporting to someone else. It’s a very important task, but it doesn’t require a data scientist. Reporting will quickly bore them to tears and they’ll resign.

2. Don’t block them from talking directly to your business areas. I often hear they have to go through the HR Business Partner who protects the business leader and blocks them from access. Working with the HR Business Partner of course makes sense. Being blocked by the HR Business Partner doesn’t.

3. Task HR Business Partners with finding either high turnover roles or low performance roles that your data scientist can work to help with.

4. Have them focus first on solving business challenges (like Financial Advisor turnover) not HR challenges like compliance issues. This will give visibility to the great work they do and introduce HR’s new expertise to solving business challenges that affect the bottom line.

5. When they complete an analytics project, give them a chance to talk and present the results, regardless of the outcomes. Did it help or not help? Don’t keep the results inside of HR.

6. Admit that you’re a little nervous about what they do. They’re nervous about what you do too.

7. Trust your data scientist. Stop being scared. You hired them because they have an area of expertise traditional HR doesn’t. Embrace their area of expertise. You need to trust their advice and approach, or, yes, they’ll leave.

 

“Anyone can hire a data scientist. Not every HR department or organization is ready for data science. Generating reports are not analytics — even if they’re prettier or faster reports. Dashboards are not analytics — even if they’re really pretty dashboards. More than anyone, HR should understand the devastating impact of changing job description on someone that’s been hired.”  -  Ironically, that data scientist hire is perhaps one of the most brilliant and strategic hires that HR department has ever made — perhaps ever. But only if they let her do what she was hired to do. HR data scientists can help move HR from being tactical to strategic, using an analytics approach to highlight never seen before patterns, make decisions based on data, and the like.


 

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Government Investigating Harman Car Radios After Fiat Chrysler Recall

Government Investigating Harman Car Radios After Fiat Chrysler Recall | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has opened an investigation into Harman car radios following a recent recall of 1.4 million Fiat Chrysler cars and trucks due to a hacking vulnerability. Hackers got into a Jeep Cherokee SUV through an electronic opening in the radio and...
Richard Platt's insight:

(If you wonder why I post about product recalls and failures - these are all examples of why products fail in the marketplace - in innovation and quality terms, it is the cost of quality, or the cost of poor quality, many overlook the point that quality underpins innovation)  -  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has opened an investigation into Harman car radios following a recent recall of 1.4 million Fiat Chrysler cars and trucks due to a hacking vulnerability.    In response, Fiat Chrysler said it sealed off a loophole in its internal cellular telephone network with vehicles to prevent similar attacks and issued a voluntary recall.  The NHTSA is investigating which other cars have the affected radios and whether they are vulnerable.  

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The IoT and the Inevitable Collision with Products Liability

This is the third in a series of blogs examining the rapid development of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its consequential impact on product liability risk. The development of the IoT...
Richard Platt's insight:

Some Takeaway Considerations:   Some articles suggest Fiat Chrysler is working with the software vendor to correct the problem. If so, it may present a liability exposure to the software vendor depending on, among other things, what is contained in the contract between Fiat Chrysler and its software vendor for defects in the software.  -  Product liability recall insurance can be expensive. If the software vendor is on the hook to absorb part or all of the recall expenses, those expenses may come directly out of its own pocket.   -  In the immediate aftermath of the publication of the vulnerabilities of motor vehicles to Internet hacking, U.S. Senators Edward Markey of Massachusetts and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut introduced legislation that would empower NHSTA and the Federal Trade Commission to establish rules to secure vehicles from hacking threats and maintain driver privacy. (See Spy Car Act of 2015.)

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The $11 Trillion Internet Of Things, Big Data And Pattern Of Life (POL) Analytics

The $11 Trillion Internet Of Things, Big Data And Pattern Of Life (POL) Analytics | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Pattern of Life analytics (POL) is a new predictive data analytical method that is similar to profiling. The implications of POL in the context of the Internet of Things (IoT) are far-reaching for both governments and business. With the recent estimates of IoT financial impact being in the trillions of dollars, Big Data is getting exponentially bigger and data analytics is becoming increasingly important and complex. Security, privacy and data protection legal compliance are paramount; the laws and regulations are rapidly changing and becoming more strict.
Richard Platt's insight:

POL, to vastly simplify the definition, is a computerized data collection and analysis method used to establish a subject’s past behavior, determine its current behavior, and predict its future behavior. 

Deeper Dive: POL Analytics  -  POL analytics is an imprecise term that was first used in social sciences including psychology and anthropology. The term has been used in data analytics for decades or more, primarily in the context of spatial analytics, including location analytics.  Pattern of life data analytics didn’t go truly mainstream until September 2013, when The Guardian headlined how NSA’s “Marina” metadata application “offers the ability to export the data in a variety of formats, as well as create various charts to assist in pattern-of-life development.”

POL and IoT:  POL analytics is not restricted to military applications, although the recent uses of the term generally derive from military documents, specifically those of the NSA .  As mentioned, the closest, most popular analogous term is “profiling”.  The first highly-publicized incident of commercial application of computerized consumer profiling was Target TGT +0.33%, Inc.’s use of collected and (allegedly) purchased information about customers, first reported by the 2012 New York Times. The reported incident was about use of the information to focus marketing efforts on women it had identified as likely to be pregnant. Based on its data analytics, Target had sent pregnancy-related information to a high-school girl at her residence, also the residence of her parents. The angry father complained to Target, and then followed up with his daughter,  about whom he had not yet been informed that she was indeed pregnant.  That incident is an early, classic case of POL intelligence that illustrated the point that consumers do not welcome evident invasions of their privacy. This Target case could be considered to be classic POL analysis, or profiling.



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Internet Of Bizarre: Strange Things Attached To The Internet

Internet Of Bizarre: Strange Things Attached To The Internet | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
About that toaster ...
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Let’s look at your garden and home. Smart thermostats in the home, for example, regulate temperature and learn the habits of the residents. A Nest or another connected temperature regulator seems to be a perfectly reasonable thing. But what about your garden? GreenIQ is software that allows gardeners to monitor and remotely water their plants using either a smartphone or—in the near future—Apple Watch or Android Wear. Both of these fall into the necessary category, as does a connected electronics kit that bears a striking resemblance to Lego and encourages people to “invent without constraints.” But did you ever think you’d find a sensor in your garden?

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Marie Thurieau's curator insight, July 31, 9:46 AM

Let’s look at your garden and home. Smart thermostats in the home, for example, regulate temperature and learn the habits of the residents. A Nest or another connected temperature regulator seems to be a perfectly reasonable thing. But what about your garden? GreenIQ is software that allows gardeners to monitor and remotely water their plants using either a smartphone or—in the near future—Apple Watch or Android Wear. Both of these fall into the necessary category, as does a connected electronics kit that bears a striking resemblance to Lego and encourages people to “invent without constraints.” But did you ever think you’d find a sensor in your garden?

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Information, Intelligence, And The IoT Fundamentally Changing The Supply Chain

Information, Intelligence, And The IoT Fundamentally Changing The Supply Chain | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
(Photo credit: Christopher R. Wilder) The digital economy is changing the game for supply chain customers. Value chains are shifting rapidly, while technology advancements are disrupting old-style operations. Additionally, traditional value chains are also on the move. Hardware Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are moving to capitalize on software and services models. [...]
Richard Platt's insight:

Information Over Inventory

Advances in technology, especially IoT, are creating dramatic changes in supply, distribution, and logistics. Spurred by improvements in sensing, computing, and communications technologies, inventory-to-sales ratios for global business have fallen dramatically for several years. Customers want to invest in expertise, intelligence, and solutions that move at market speed, reduce inventories, mitigate risk, and manage and/or orchestrate third-party logistics and service providers more efficiently. Businesses are relying more and more on timely, contextually relevant data to achieve return on their investments. With the increase in diverse datapoints, systems are being developed to move beyond business intelligence to single sources of truth—or single instances of ERP—which provide a single console for all aspects of operational and enterprise systems

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Prepping for the convergence of the IoT in automotive

Richard Platt's insight:

The value of the market for connected car services is forecast to grow to $148 billion in 2020, according to   PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), with safety-related features expected to account for 47% of services, followed by autonomous driving at 35%, and entertainment features accounting for 13%. This networked mobility market represents a tripling from today’s levels, and is not only being pushed by demand for connected-car components, but also by the rise of entirely new digital business opportunities.  -  Turning this new vehicular software platform into a potential revenue stream for manufacturers are the over-the-air (OTA) updates that make sure each automobile is running the latest, most effective code. The OTA concept has been speeding forward. At least six automakers – BMW, Hyundai, Ford, Toyota, Mercedes-Benz, and Tesla – now offer OTA software updates, with many more likely to join them over the next 18 months or so.  -  OTA software upgrades not only affect entertainment systems, but powertrain and vehicle safety systems as well. According to analyst firm Gartner, there will be 250 million connected vehicles on the road by 2020, so within five years OTA software upgrades are expected to be commonplace for new vehicles. 


Designing for the future

The biggest business opportunities arise when engineers design for the expansion of software – for adding new features and functions. Thinking of vehicle functionality after it leaves the showroom will be central to this new thinking, as automobiles (like in the networking industry where areas like buffer, storage, and switching capacity are appropriately designed to enable updates several years in the future) should be built for future expansion, and assume a long-term software evolution. Most of today’s newest cars are not designed this way outside of perhaps the infotainment unit, which has more capability as the electronic control units (ECUs) in those systems have greater memory and storage and are better equipped for future upgrades. Other than safety systems, the rest of a vehicle’s ECUs were designed to be cost-optimized for the sale.  -  There’s a paradigm shift taking place in the automotive industry, and car designers and OEMs must now think about what it will take for a vehicle to stay current with technology.

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Qualcomm says it can now wirelessly charge metal phones

The best phones around are increasingly being made with metal bodies and frames, which has posed an issue for wireless charging. Metal phones have had to rely on supplementary cases if they want to...
Richard Platt's insight:

Qualcomm's description of how wireless charging will work for metal phones is lacking in detail. But for the most part, it sounds like the process will be about the same. As long as a device is within range of a wireless charging pad, it'll charge.  -  The new tech is being made available today to the companies that want it. Of course, there's still a battle going on between wireless charging standards, making it hard to tell how many companies will actually be interested in choosing Rezence. At the very least, Qualcomm seems to be giving phone makers one solid reason.

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IoT Connected Devices To Almost Triple To Over 38 Billion Units by 2020

IoT Connected Devices To Almost Triple To Over 38 Billion Units by 2020 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Total Device Base Driven by Surge in Connected Industrial Applications. New data from Juniper Research has revealed that the number of IoT (Internet of Things) connected devices will number 38.5 billion in 2020, up from 13.4 billion in 2015: a rise of over 285%. While IoT ‘smart home’ based applications grab media headlines, it is ...

Via M2M World News
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IoT Still in a Nascent State:  The new research, The Internet of Things: Consumer, Industrial & Public Services 2015-2020, found that while the number of connected devices already exceeds the number of humans on the planet by over 2 times, for most enterprises, simply connecting their systems and devices remains the first priority.

Additional Findings

  • The consumer segment (composed of the smart home, connected vehicles and digital healthcare), represents a high ARPU (average revenue per user) market segment.
  • Meanwhile, the industrial sector (composed of retail, connected buildings and agriculture) will enable high ROI (return on investment) through IoT projects, owing to more efficient business processes.


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The Intelligent Soldier System: Military Wearables

The Intelligent Soldier System: Military Wearables | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
When it comes to wearable technology for military applications, the needs of the users equate to life-or-death situations.
Richard Platt's insight:

Being ex-military myself and having had a hand in many technologies (high and low tech) that soldiers use this was an interesting article discussing the applications and challenges that this demographic has to deal with.  


"Military development programs revolve around improving the capabilities of the soldier. Technology platforms, whether they are wearable or not, and regardless of technical sophistication, will only ever be a part of the solution in this development process.  All of the military personnel at the HMS Belfast event agreed that too much of the development so far has been technology focused, without properly addressing the needs of the soldier. This is an expected problem for a small company looking to exploit new markets for their technology. At the other end of the spectrum, the likes of BAE Systems, Lockheed Martin, and others are involving military personnel earlier in the development process, but the challenge is significant because the stakes are at their highest."

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wearables4business's curator insight, July 30, 5:40 PM

Being ex-military myself and having had a hand in many technologies (high and low tech) that soldiers use this was an interesting article discussing the applications and challenges that this demographic has to deal with.  

 

"Military development programs revolve around improving the capabilities of the soldier. Technology platforms, whether they are wearable or not, and regardless of technical sophistication, will only ever be a part of the solution in this development process.  All of the military personnel at the HMS Belfast event agreed that too much of the development so far has been technology focused, without properly addressing the needs of the soldier. This is an expected problem for a small company looking to exploit new markets for their technology. At the other end of the spectrum, the likes of BAE Systems, Lockheed Martin, and others are involving military personnel earlier in the development process, but the challenge is significant because the stakes are at their highest."

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How retailers are selling the power of IoT

How retailers are selling the power of IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A dive into Sears' Connected Solutions hub and Target’s Open House reveals that a lot of connected devices have functions and price points that can appeal to the practical homeowner. 
Richard Platt's insight:

IoT could 'pay for itself':  

What is striking, even at Target where some of the items were on the out-there side (a smart baby onesie?) is that many of the things in its showroom are priced within reach. Again, the items may have been more than their non-smart (dumb?) counterparts, but nothing that would incite a gasp.  -  In fact, the difference in price seems in line with the added capabilities. (With larger appliances, like many of those bigger appliances available at Sears, the setup requires the purchase of an additional hub to connect it to the existing router. Many Sonos fans have also learned this the hard way).

“I think the price points are probably where they should be. What you have to consider is what it can do for you,” Ciovacco told Retail Dive. “A $250 wi-fi thermostat may not be worth it. That is, if you’re just using it because you can control it with your phone, it’s overpriced. But if you use it and take advantage of its ability to save energy, you can unlock a lot of savings that more than pays for itself.”

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Samsung's new monitor will wirelessly charge your smartphone

Samsung's new monitor will wirelessly charge your smartphone | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A new monitor from Samsung has an added feature -- integrated wireless charging for mobile devices.
Richard Platt's insight:

New monitor from Samsung has an added feature which we wouldn't mind seeing in more monitors from now on — integrated wireless charging for mobile devices.  If your mobile device supports Qi wireless charging — as Samsung's Galaxy S6, Google's Nexus 6 or LG's G3 do — you can simply place it on the monitor's stand, and it will be automatically charged.


Besides wireless charging, the Samsung SE370 brings a 1,920x1,080 pixel resolution, a response time of 4ms, 250 cd/m2 brightness, 1000:1 contrast ratio and a horizontal and vertical viewing angle of 178 degrees. It has a PLS type panel and has HDMI, DP and D-Sub ports.  The monitor will come in two sizes: 23.6 and 27 inches — the specifications are the same save for one detail; the 27-inch model is a little brighter at 300 cd/m2.  -  Pricing and availability have not been announced.


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How The Wrong People Get Promoted And How To Change It

How The Wrong People Get Promoted And How To Change It | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Research reveals that companies consistently choose the wrong people for management roles. Here's what you can do to avoid the same mistake.
Richard Platt's insight:

More on the Gallup Research about Talented Managers:

Gallup studied individual managers at numerous organizations, and discovered those managers who most consistently drove high engagement, loyalty, productivity, profit, and service levels all shared five uncommon talents:

  • They motivate their employees.
  • They assert themselves to overcome obstacles.
  • They create a culture of accountability.
  • They build trusting relationships.
  • They make informed, unbiased decisions for the good of their team and organization.

Gallup confirmed this combination of innate talent is so rare that it exists in about only one out of 10 people. They also believe another two out of 10 people have some of these five talents, and can become great managers with the right coaching and development.

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