Internet of Thing...
Follow
Find
11.0K views | +51 today
 
Scooped by Richard Platt
onto Internet of Things - Technology focus
Scoop.it!

Why Robots Are Better Than Humans At Testing Human User Experiences

Why Robots Are Better Than Humans At Testing Human User Experiences | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Device-testing robots type, draw and play games on the gadgets they’re testing.
more...
No comment yet.
Internet of Things - Technology focus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution

Harvard's Michael Porter: Service Leaders Will Be Hard Hit by IoT Revolution | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things transformation will have a big impact on the service and maintenance industries. Here are 4 ways service leaders must adapt.
Richard Platt's insight:

Porter, along with Jim Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC, summarized their findings from a November 2014 HBR article about how the Internet of Things (IoT) is disrupting various industries, field service included. The pair also spoke about ongoing research on the implications for company strategy and organization, which will be published in HBR later this year.

“Not only is the product changing, the product change is feeding back and changing how companies operate today,” Porter said. “How you run a company is going to change much more dramatically than in previous generations of IT.” 

1. Service businesses will shift from reactive to proactive:  There will be a transformation in the way service businesses are run and organized, as connected products allow technicians to diagnose the problem, or even perform service, remotely. Companies will be able to push updates to products in the field, and analyze product usage data to improve service efficiency and warranty management. As new IoT-enabled technologies take hold, service companies will move beyond the repair model to data-enabled advanced services that add value to customers. Ultimately, Porter said, this model will evolve to “product-as-a-service” as companies design new functionality and extend product life cycles. 

2. Big data will create an entirely new section of the value chain:    Companies will find ways to create value from the constant data stream from both internal and external factors. (Internal data could be product usage and equipment performance information, while external data could include weather conditions.)  Porter and Heppelmann said that, rather than having each division deal with its own data separately, companies need to create a “unified data group,” led by a chief data officer, that can store, aggregate and analyze the data — and work closely with other divisions to uncover insights that create customer value.

3. Product design will require a long-term, integrative approach:  Product design will become “evergreen,” said Porter, meaning products will be continuously re-designed and serviced via remote connections and services once they’re in the field. As a result, companies must find a new approach to product design that accounts for everything that happens after the sale is closed.  In addition, increased connectivity will require manufacturers to look at products within a larger, networked system. A “smart” tractor, for example, will have its own data analytics connections, but it must also interface with other smart machines on the farm.

4. Expect more consolidation and a war for talent: Porter frames the changes led by the IoT as an opportunity for companies to broaden their offerings and lead with innovative product functionality. There are two choices: cling to business as usual, or adapt. Companies that don’t react will have their products subsumed by companies that do. Porter predicts this will lead to further consolidation across industries, allowing companies to expand their market and products through data and IoT functionality. - But the biggest hurdle, Porter said, is likely to be the war for talent. There are currently too few people with the necessary mix of skills to tackle the new challenges presented by the IoT era.



more...
Ingo Scheidweiler's curator insight, June 19, 3:51 AM

Im Service 4.0 müssen sich auch die Service Bereiche anpassen. Viele liegen hier noch im Dämmerschlaf und kümmern sich um Minutenpreise im Call-Center oder Erstlösungsquoten. Vielen Chancen liegen in den neuen Industrie 4.0 und IoT Entwicklungen und ich empfehle, frühzeitig Projekte aufzusetzen, um sich hierfür zu wappnen. Design Thinking Workshops oder einfach nur simple Brainstorming-Meetings rund um mögliche Service Innovationen können ein erster Schritt sein. Erste Kunden von uns fangen bereits damit an ...

pohora's curator insight, June 19, 3:51 AM

Adapt or be subsumed by competitors with IoT shift.

Frank Boross's curator insight, June 24, 6:52 PM

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a scenario in which objects, animals or even people are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction. IoT has evolved from the convergence of wireless technologies, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and the Internet.

 

Evergreen design will change how we work in facilities management. After-sales or "service" data will become critical. A "smart" machine, for example a floor scrubber, will have its own data analytics connections for servicing, but it must also interface with other smart machines used in the building. This opens up all kinds of possibilities in facilities management. 

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Why The Internet Of Things Is Still Roadblocked

Why The Internet Of Things Is Still Roadblocked | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Its potential is huge; so are the obstacles.
Richard Platt's insight:

IDTechEx outlines in its report

1. The Internet is still not available in many areas of the world. While companies like Google are working hard to change this with its balloon-powered Internet and other low-power, low-cost ways to spread the Internet, success has been spotty to date.

2. There aren't many large potential customers. While there are roughly 10 billion sensors deployed today for natural resources, production lines, electricity grids, logistics networks, recycling, homes, offices, stores and vehicles, many are not connected to the Internet or even parts of a network. The investments needed to complete these connections won't materialize until the revenue potential is clear.  Some companies like Bosch understand this and are building services on top of networks of sensors, but most organizations have been slow to embrace the potential of connecting everything.

3. Lack of standards. More than 400 standards already exist, which is tantamount to there being no standards at all. Manufacturers need to be persuaded to build standard communication protocols for the sensors they embed into their products, rather than creating data silos with proprietary protocols.

Related to #2, businesses need to change in ways that make data sharing more appealing than data hoarding. So long as organizations think they need to exclusively build both the things and the services that connect them, the Internet of Things will remain stillborn.

4. Software to be defined. There are many software, system integration and processing issues, like determining what middleware should do and whether to perform analytics in the device or in the network. Related to #3, each sensor type collects and transmits data in a different format, and it's unlikely that any given API hub or integration site will accommodate all sensor data types. Little consensus exists, but we badly need standardized middleware anyway.

5. Security and safety issues. Smart and connected devices systems and other tools can be attacked or deployed to access highly sensitive data, as scholars and others have highlighted. Also, simply flooding the frequencies of wireless networks can paralyze them. An Internet of Things is no good if the things can't talk.

6. Power is a problem. Because large deployments mean the batteries in nodes may not be rechargeable or even replaceable, we'll probably need energy harvesting—in which systems capture and store power from ambient sources like solar or kinetic energy—to power a vast array of lower-power gadgets without batteries.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

RealSense Tech brings fantasy to your living room - Science Fiction in Your Real Life

RealSense Tech brings fantasy to your living room - Science Fiction in Your Real Life | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Intel RealSense is the most high-tech camera system you've ever seen.
Richard Platt's insight:

This kind of technology used to be reserved for your imagination — like sending your personal robot out to fetch the newspaper, deleting a computer document by making a paper-crumpling gesture with your hand or even watching a hologram of your mother wish you a happy birthday.   -  RealSense is an advanced form of "Natural User Interface" technology. In laymen's terms, let's just call it the most high-tech camera system you've ever seen.

It works like this: As opposed to standard cameras — which only "see" in two dimensions — RealSense cameras create three-dimensional models of their subjects and surroundings. So when your finger is five inches away from the computer screen, RealSense can tell.  -  This three-dimensional modeling opens the door for all kinds of sleek computer interactions. Picture yourself editing a film or creating a photo album on your computer and manipulating objects not by moving your mouse or touching the screen, but by using your hands to "pick up" and "move" pieces of your project.  -  Intel showed several futuristic RealSense integrations that display the power and potential of cameras that see in 3D in January at CES. They've partnered with the Food Network to create an app that allows chefs to control their computers when their hands are messy; they're working to create wearables that can help the vision-impaired "see" their environments more clearly; and they demonstrated how RealSense cameras can allow drones to autonomously navigate the world with full depth perception.

more...
Glenn Wallace's curator insight, June 29, 9:33 AM

Keep your mind on the prize

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

6 Ways to Boost IoT Security

6 Ways to Boost IoT Security | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Six techniques can help create a secure foundation for devices that are part of the Internet of Things.
Richard Platt's insight:
  1. Authentication:  consider, where possible, a hardware- or software-based Trusted Platform Module (TPM) to provide robust cryptographic device identities.
  2. Health Assurance: the Trusted Network Connect (TNC) standards, which specify a standard mechanism to check which software or firmware is running on a device, are among the protocols and mechanisms for safeguarding the patch and upgrade process. Malware can be detected at boot time using the TPM’s Trusted Boot and Remote Attestation capabilities, even to the point of finding changes in the device’s BIOS or other firmware.
  3. Recovery:  The IF-PEP protocol, a standard interface between the Policy Decision Point and the Policy Enforcement Point, can be used to isolate the infected machine. The remediation can be done by the device itself using a set of “golden” measurements in protected storage, remotely over the network, or with runtime integrity checking, which is provided by several commercial products.
  4. Protect secrets even if a device is infected: This begins with the creation of a secure envelope, such as a TPM. Where a TPM isn’t enough, consider a Mandatory Access Control system to provide another, larger security envelope.
  5. Data protection:  Consider a write-once or read-only mechanism to prevent tampering with data on the IoT device, or restricting access to secrets (such as encryption keys) only to devices that can prove their software configurations are valid.  
  6. Secure legacy hardware such as industrial control systems: For older or proprietary hardware that doesn’t support modern networks or security standards, the Trusted Network Connect architecture includes a specification (IF-MAP Metadata for ICS Security) that organizes legacy devices into local enclaves that connect to a trusted network using security gateways.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The 1st 3D-Printed Supercar - Video

Meet Blade - a super-light sports car with a 3D printed chassis, designed as an alternative to traditional car manufacturing. Through 3D printing, entreprene...
Richard Platt's insight:

More details on the costs and how Divergent Microfactories create their "Blade" Super Car, (video), very interesting and cool.

more...
Sabine VanderLinden's curator insight, June 28, 6:15 AM

The Internet of Thing is making wave. First 3D printed Vehicle. New manufacturing and design  approach could bring the chassis of a high quality vehicles under $2,000.

Gaétan Franchimont's curator insight, June 28, 7:05 AM

Blade, la première Supercar "imprimée" en 3D!

L'impression 3D révolutionne le secteur de l'automobile.

Ces nouvelles technologies permettent aujourd'hui de rendre l'innovation abordable à de petites entreprises, ce qui dans un avenir proche, nous amènera à rencontrer de plus en plus de nouveaux prototypes "3D Printed".

 

Glenn Wallace's curator insight, June 28, 11:17 AM

Check it out

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wow - Car built with parts from a 3D printer is blazing fast

Wow - Car built with parts from a 3D printer is blazing fast | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A new car manages to be extremely fast, lightweight, cost effective and environmentally friendly; all because its chassis is comprised entirely of material originating from a 3D printer.
Richard Platt's insight:

The “Blade” is very fast: reaching 60 mph in just two seconds, the vehicle is fitted with a 700 horsepower engine and features twice the power-to-weight ratio as the famous lightning-swift Bugatti Veyron. What’s more, the car costs 1/50th of what it takes to produce a normal factory made car; it also makes 70% less carbon emissions than a standard vehicle, and weights 90% less than most standard automobiles.  Divergent Microfactories uses a 3D printer, and a proprietary compound they have created which the company calls “a Node”. A Node is a 3D-printed aluminum joint “that connects pieces of carbon fiber tubing to make up the car’s chassis”.


Divergent Microfactories claims it seeks to “democratize auto manufacturing” through the creation of the Node. Smaller teams of entrepreneurs can theoretically use this technology to create their own vehicles – as well as anything else they can think to make out of 3D-printed aluminum.  According to reports the Blade itself only takes thirty minutes to put together. The chassis is comprised of 70 different 3D-printed nodes, and it weighs just 61 pounds.


The company is looking for investors to fund their proposed $10 million budget, which will be used to set up a factory where Divergent can finalize the prototype, which they will then outsource to other developers in order to fund the creation of mass production factories for the Blade.  - This kind of use of 3D Printing technology will undoubtedly revolutionize a number of industries, automobiles is just one of the many.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The New Desktop Computer Built for IT Depts | Pint-sized powerhouse - Intel NUC5i5RYK

The New Desktop Computer Built for IT Depts | Pint-sized powerhouse - Intel NUC5i5RYK | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Fed with the hottest chips, just how fast can the little fellah go?
Richard Platt's insight:

The Intel NUC is a DIY kit for company IT departments to configure the system as they see fit.  (The basic NUC comes as a barebones kit, meaning that it needs memory, a hard drive and an operating system.) The NUC’s 10cm square motherboard makes the 17cm square mini-ITX platform seem practically Gulliver-like in comparison.  - Intel might have intended the NUC to be for regular home users but given the DIY nature of it, that my suspicion is that many folks who don't have the technical understanding would probably pass on it, at least as it's currently configured for the market. Just my opinion  There are several versions on a theme with the latest NUC, but all are powered by 5th generation Intel Core i5 or i3 processors, supporting up to 16GB of DDR3L RAM. The shorter platforms; NUC5i5RYK and NUC5i3RYK support M.2 storage (both SATA and PCI-E) in 2242, 2260 and 2280 formats. The smaller (48.7mm) NUC5i5RYH and NUC5i3RYH retain the M.2 support but has the ability to install a (9.5mm) 2.5in drive.  In the taller format there is a Core i7-powered version due soon, the NUC5i7RYH. This uses a 3.1GHz (3.4GHz with Turbo boost) dual-core i7-5557U processor with Iris Pro (6100) graphics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Automatic wheelchair designed by schoolboys among Teen Tech award winners

Automatic wheelchair designed by schoolboys among Teen Tech award winners | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Student-designed wheelchair that promotes independence in disabled people is among the winners at tech innovation awards for 11-16 year olds.
Richard Platt's insight:

Designed for use in the home, hospitals, special schools and care homes, SmartChair moves around unaided using a sensor that follows a white line placed on the floor. The picture above is a model prototype.  - For the 2015 competition students aged 11 to 16 were invited to submit designs in 19 categories to solve real-world problems using technology. 


Other winners included:

  • eWaterTap (Infrastructure): A device to be used in rural Africa to help communities manage their water systems. Park House School, Jack, Connor and Laurence.
  • Photoglas (Wearable Technology): Photosensitive epilepsy glasses that monitor temperature, humidity, noise, light, air quality and barometric pressure, its aim to detect and prevent seizures. Loreto Grammar School – Emma.
  • Aidship (International Collaboration): An airship designed to transport aid to areas of natural disaster.  The King Edward VI School, Tom, Alistair and Jack.
  • Money Manager (Retail and Finance): An app that people to budget by comparing spending habits. Notre Dame School, Greenock, Lucy, Lucy and Bethany.
  • Real Strings (Music, Media and Entertainment): Designed for guitarists, reels hold string that can be used when the guitar needs restringing. Okehampton College, Sam and Reece.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Micron’s Small Form Factor Memory Enabling New Wearable Product Categories

Micron’s Small Form Factor Memory Enabling New Wearable Product Categories | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

The Key Here in Micron's product announcement is "In a diverse segment such as this, the end application in most cases drives the design decision around memory. Some of the early low-end fitness monitors and watches were able to satisfy their memory requirements with memory embedded inside a microcontroller unit (MCU). Today, OEMs are packing more attractive features into their devices to differentiate their products and meet customer expectations. This is driving the need for additional external memory, such as Serial Flash (NOR and NAND), PSRAM, and multichip packages (MCPs), which combine RAM and Flash into one package."  - Memory management as a part of the MCP is likely from what we've seen the best strategy for wearable, and IoT devices as companies move forward.



While Serial NOR/NAND Flash can meet the memory requirements for low-end wearables, the higher end of the market (cameras and glasses) requires more managed Flash and Mobile DRAM to meet the needs of powerful video/audio processors and colorful displays, and the need for storage (photos and videos)

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mohit Gupta
Scoop.it!

What Happens to all the Big Data that Internet of Things Collects?

What Happens to all the Big Data that Internet of Things Collects? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The combination of Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT) is powerful, and integrated into our lives in more ways already than one might think.
Richard Platt's insight:

Consider the following:  -  Data points collected from consumer devices can be used to create a fully automated and proactive customer service platform. This represents an entirely new level of automation, going far beyond simple auto-responses. It anticipates needs, spots trends, and addresses problems before they occur.
Data collected from devices can be part of a continuous improvement practice. Fed back to the engineering or design team, this data helps improve the product line to better meet customers’ needs, increasing customer loyalty.    -  This powerful combination also creates new revenue opportunities. By understanding customers and their wants and needs, and spotting growing trends, the company will be able to roll out new products or services that already have built-up demand.  -  Even more powerful is the fact that the data collected from individual devices can be combined and presented in a common platform – giving companies the ability to understand, for example, what products each customer is using or not using, what else they might need or desire, and creating a truly integrated and intelligent support platform.  -  The potential is already at hand to leverage IoT to redefine the customer experience, create a tighter link between customer and provider, and deliver a more synchronized and intelligent support environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Internet of things is overhyped and should instead be called internet with things

Internet of things is overhyped and should instead be called internet with things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Cisco believes there will be 50 billion devices connected to the internet by 2050 (more than five per person).
Richard Platt's insight:

Healthcare, pollution and transport could all be greatly improved if there were trusted platforms that people were willing to share data over, according to Beighton, but this is far from today’s reality.

Instead, Beighton believes there will be isolated “communities of things” that are connected to the internet, largely because they will all work on different standards, thereby meaning they can't talk to each other.  Keep said governments have a role to play in connecting things to the internet, adding that UK spend on the internet of things (roughly £40 million) is dwarfed by Germany, a nation spending billions on IoT research and development.

“They’re concerned about losing their manufacturing to other low cost countries,” said Keep. “They put a lot of money into research.”

A number of UK startups are aiming to launch businesses off the idea that everything is connected to the internet. One such company is opensensors.io, founded by Yodit Stanton.who said the UK government is keen to help startups like hers but claimed that it moves too slowly.  “I think there is a will,” she said. “But the pace they move at for me as a startup is too slow. Six months is a lifetime. We have to move. That kind of connection isn’t there in terms of understanding the pace.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

iPhones hit with 'blue screens of death'

iPhones hit with 'blue screens of death' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Users of Apple's iPhone on T-Mobile's network are reportedly suffering from random "blue screens of death."
Richard Platt's insight:

Blue screen of death problems appear to affect a wide spectrum of Apple devices ranging from the iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6 and iPhone 5s, says MacRumors, and the restarts occur at 10 minute to 30 minute intervals. The problem affects several versions of iOS 8 including iOS 8.3.  Complaints keep piling in. Some users are saying they problem is solved by turning off Wi-Fi calling. Yet others are resorting to a complete hard reset.  Quality issues aren’t what a stock trying to retake its high needs. Earlier this week, the company said it would replace malfunctioning hard disk drives in iMac PCs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Internet of Everything on display at Pan Am Games 2015

Internet of Everything on display at Pan Am Games 2015 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It was almost one year ago today that Jeff Seifert stood next to a giant, colourful, and connected clock in Toronto’s Nathan
Richard Platt's insight:

The event, which claims to be the 3rd-largest amateur sports event ever and larger in scope than the Vancouver Olympics, features Cisco as a title sponsor. The vendor of networking communications technology plans to use the opportunity to showcase the power of the “Internet of Everything,” a term that it uses to describe the trend of connected devices and the resulting sea of data generated by them. Even the clock is connected via high-capacity fibre, and offers information kiosk capabilities as a result. A year ago, Seifert even hinted it would facilitate video chats between athletes and pedestrians.  -  Behind the scenes, Cisco is running the network for the various games venues that stretch across southwestern Ontario. Seifert anticipates a huge demand on the networks during the events. With 17 days left on the countdown clock, he’s talking about the importance that it all work when the games are on.

“Whether it be Wi-Fi for our spectators, whether it be the scoreboards, or the results for the athletes, really it can not fail,” he says. “There is a tremendous community of users that come together … there’s athletes, spectators, and media, but there are a lot of sports organizations involved as well. The demands on the raw power of the network are increasing with every competition.”

Working with Seifert and Cisco is Brian Cook, vice-president of IT for the TO2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games. A veteran of major live sporting events including the 2012 London Olympics and past Pan Am Games, Cook is ready to turn the key on firing up a huge IT operation for the duration of the event. Deploying wireless networks, radio coverage, boosting cell coverage, and installing computer systems are all part and parcel of the requirements.

“You’re looking at a crushed time frame,” he says. “Because the venues have exclusive access, we’re looking to bump this equipment in a 15-day time frame.”  The budget isn’t exactly generous. Cook’s team has $77 million to work with – compare that to about $1 billion for the London Olympics – so it will be looking to lean on Cisco’s sponsorship to be as effective as possible. Cisco has tapped its network of partners to assist with the effort and has even tapped its Cisco Networking Academy to chip in. That educational initiative will see college and high school students assigned to working at different venues, supported by a mentor from Cisco.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Are Chromebooks Good Laptops for Students?

Are Chromebooks Good Laptops for Students? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
There’s a lot to like about Chromebooks. They’re budget-friendly, have a lot of options, and are powerful enough to get things done. If you’re a student shopping for a laptop for school, they may be pretty attractive. For some students, Chromebooks are a savvy purchase, but for others, it’s a nightmare waiting to happen. Let’s see where you fall.
Richard Platt's insight:

Here are some of the types of students who can benefit from a Chromebook:

Students who do everything on the web: For most of us, the majority of the tools and services we work with are on the web, or have great webapps that we could use instead of programs installed locally.
Students who have reliable internet access: Even though Chrome OS has some offline capabilities and applications, most of its power comes from being always connected. 
Students who want one computer on the go and another as a home base: One great thing about Chromebooks is that they’re really affordable. A good one can run you a couple hundred dollars, compared to the thousands you’ll spend on a more powerful laptop. Students who don’t play video games (or do, just not on their Chromebook): Gaming on a Chromebook is pretty much a non-starter, unless the games you play are primarily web-based games

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

What's Blocking The $11 Trillion IoT Opportunity

What's Blocking The $11 Trillion IoT Opportunity | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The road to IoT' is paved with gold—and roadblocks.
Richard Platt's insight:

Unfortunately, there are plenty of factors impeding this data-rich future. The problems range from the 400-plus competing IoT standards to lack of global Internet connectivity, and more.

McKinsey also offers a range of complicating factors. Topping the firm's list, rightly so, is the matter of varying standards which prevent many systems and devices from communicating with each other.  McKinsey describes this incompatibility as the primary roadblock:  Interoperability between IoT systems is critical. Of the total potential economic value the IoT enables, interoperability is required for 40% on average and for nearly 60% in some settings.  The report goes on to suggest two fixes: "Adopting open standards is one way to accomplish interoperability. Interoperability can also be achieved by implementing systems or platforms that enable different IoT systems to communicate with one another."  Vendors largely control the 400-plus competing standards, but the battle for developer hearts won't be won by a corporate logo-laden home page. Open source, however, could help, allowing developers to focus on interoperable code, rather than interoperable vendors

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

IoT Wireless Convergence Sparks Testing Challenges

IoT Wireless Convergence Sparks Testing Challenges | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In support of fast-growing wireless markets, test equipment manufacturers are embracing highly modular and adaptable measurement instruments designed to speed through multiple-device test scenarios.
Richard Platt's insight:

The first two recommendations had they been applied at the time, would have saved Steve Jobs and Apple the embarrassment of the whole "antenna-gate" debacle of July 2010

1. Many wireless portable devices contain both Wi-Fi and cellular hardware that may lead to Wi-Fi receiver desensitization if operating simultaneously 

2. Over-the-air (OTA) testing is necessary to measure the actual performance and compliance of a complete Wi-Fi module.

3. Several test-and-measurement companies are embracing modular chassis for wireless testing to allow for customization and parallel testing architectures. (Anritsu has a tester)

4. A common solution for RF production testing offers a complete all-in-one tester for wireless devices. (Rohde & Schwarz has a tester)

5. The capability to upgrade or easily repair tester modules from a common chassis is attractive to many automated test designers. (Keysight Technologies has a tester)

6. Test and measurement equipment with flexible hardware and software can lead to creating customized wireless standard/protocol test and efficient automated test systems. (National Instruments has a tester)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google didn’t lead the self-driving vehicle revolution. John Deere did.

Google didn’t lead the self-driving vehicle revolution. John Deere did. | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The future is already here on the farm.
Richard Platt's insight:

"We kind of laugh when we see news stories about self-driving cars, because we've had that for years," Jason Poole, a 34-year-old crop consultant from Kansas said.  The advancements being rolled out on the farm could soon show up next door: Your neighbor can already replace his lawn mower with the John Deere equivalent of a Roomba robotic vacuum for his yard.  -  The self-driving technology being sold by John Deere and some of its competitors are less technically complex than the fully driverless cars that big tech companies and car manufacturers are working on. And for now, the tractors are still supposed to have a driver behind the wheel - even if they never touch it.  -  They've already started to transform farming in America and abroad: John Deere is selling auto-steering and other self-guidance tech in more than 100 countries, said Cory Reed, VP of the John Deere's Intelligent Solutions Group.  -  "John Deere is the largest operator of autonomous vehicles," said Catherine J.K. Sandoval, a California public utilities commissioner at a recent event hosted by the FTC.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

3D Blade at the cutting edge of motoring

3D Blade at the cutting edge of motoring | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Welcome to the future of motoring - a 3D supercar that could revolutionise how vehicles are made.
Richard Platt's insight:

More on Divergent Microfactories and their "Blade" - In addition to unveiling its technology platform and prototype they announced plans to democratise auto manufacturing. The goal is to put the platform in the hands of small entrepreneurial teams around the world, allowing them to set up their own microfactories and build their own cars and, eventually, other large complex structures. According to CEO Kevin Czinger states "these microfactories will make innovation affordable, while reducing the health and environmental impacts of traditional manufacturing.  “As Blade proves, we’ve done it without sacrificing style or substance. We’ve developed a sustainable path forward for the car industry that we believe will result in a renaissance in car manufacturing, with innovative, eco-friendly cars like Blade being designed and built in microfactories around the world.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Intel's free remote app lets you control your PC with your Android phone

Intel's free remote app lets you control your PC with your Android phone | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The new Remote Keyboard app is designed for Intel's NUC and Compute Stick miniature PCs, but should work with any machine running Windows 7 and higher.
Richard Platt's insight:

Why this matters: While Intel is hardly the first company to offer remote mouse software for smartphones and tablets, other apps such as Unified Remote and Mobile Mouse either cost money or are ad-supported. Intel’s solution isn’t as full-featured, but it could be all you need for remotely controlling a PC in your living room or during a presentation. -  A bare-bones app that just works  -  Once paired, the app provides a full keyboard (including arrow keys and a Windows button), along with a trackpad that supports multi-touch gestures such as two-finger scrolling. There’s also a scroll bar on the side of the screen if you’d rather scroll with just a thumb. In a thoughtful touch, the keyboard slides out of the way while using the trackpad in landscape mode, then pops in again when you take your fingers off the screen.   - If you’ve tried other remote mouse apps, you might miss some of their luxuries while using Intel’s version. There are no shortcut buttons for opening programs or managing windows, and no media control buttons either. And because the keyboard is built into the app, you can’t use your phone’s voice dictation capabilities. Intel’s app does just a couple things, but does them well and doesn’t cost a dime.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

How Operations Managers Can Be Heroes (and Keep Their Jobs) with Industrial IoT

How Operations Managers Can Be Heroes (and Keep Their Jobs) with Industrial IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
News about Barcelona IOT Solutions World Congress 2015 related to congress and the sector.
Richard Platt's insight:

If IIoT is implemented correctly, a tremendous amount of time, money and energy can be saved. Here are the top areas to consider:

1. Maintenance optimization.

2. Energy Efficiency.

3. Machines efficiency (OEE).

4. Product quality control.

5. Automation of the production.


It is common to hear of 50% production time optimization, and savings of 15% of the maintenance costs and 10% of energy costs. This doesn't even factor in quality control or automation! Plus, we all agree that a working machine is easier to maintain than a broken one. These numbers will impress your executive team and make you a hero! But will they impact your job negatively in the long run? Make you obsolete? What about your team? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Forget Your Smartwatch, Because Smart Clothing is Where It's At

Forget Your Smartwatch, Because Smart Clothing is Where It's At | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Google is now making smart clothes with Levi’s, and the partnership between the two powerhouses is just one example of this hot high-tech market.
Richard Platt's insight:

The number of companies involved in this industry, more broadly referred to as the Internet of Things, is also expected to multiply in the near future.  -  The term refers to the network of physical objects that contain embedded technology to communicate and sense or interact with their internal states or the external environment. This technology excludes PCs, tablets and smartphones.-  What it does include is such things as smart shirts, gloves, jackets and socks. Early versions of these items are already available on sites such as Wearables.com.  - Shirts available on the Wearables site include one produced by Athos that allows for biomonitoring. Selling for a steep $298, the shirt contains 14 sensors to monitor muscle activity, two heart rate sensors and two breathing sensors. The smart garment gathers your information via The Core, a small device worn in the shirt that connects via Bluetooth to a smartphone app. All that and it's machine washable.

Even more interesting are the Beartek motorcycle gloves sold by Wearables that allow you to control your phone, music and camera using touch points on the gloves. In other words, you don't have to actually touch devices to answer calls, play and pause music or take pictures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

New FLIR One Thermal Imaging Accessory Launched for Android and iOS

New FLIR One Thermal Imaging Accessory Launched for Android and iOS | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The second-generation FLIR One accessory is available for iOS devices at roughly Rs. 16,000, and will go on sale for Android next month.
Richard Platt's insight:

2nd-generation FLIR One plug-in thermal is imaging accessory for Android and iOS devices.  The accessory transforms a mobile device to into a thermal imager that with infrared can show heat images and measures temperature.  The company claims that the FLIR One can show temperature variations of less than a tenth of a degree. "The technology enables a host of practical applications, from identifying energy inefficiencies and water leaks in a home, to enabling safe and enjoyable outdoor exploration,". - The updated FLIR One is now available worldwide at an MSRP of $249.99 for iOS devices, while the Android-compatible version of the FLIR One will be available in July.   -  The company also announced a price cut for its 1st-generation FLIR One for Apple iPhone 5 and iPhone 5s, which will be available at $149.99 when originally launched at $349.  

more...
Gaétan Franchimont's curator insight, June 27, 7:05 AM

FLIR propose sa seconde génération accessoires pour transformer son smartphone en une caméra à vision thermique.

Bien plus qu'un nouveau gadget, FLIR One permet entre autre de repérer toute perte de chaleur ou fuite d'eau dans une habitation...

 

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Technology conceives the inconceivable

Technology conceives the inconceivable | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A funny thing happened on the way to the internet of things. Many of the “things” got a mind of their own. They also started to be produced in surprising new ways, often at much lower cost, and mutate into forms few anticipated. Technology
Richard Platt's insight:

The internet of things feels like one of those technology revolutions. It was founded on the idea that when inanimate objects, from lightbulbs to complex industrial equipment, are connected to the internet interesting new things will become possible. The expected benefits include being able to control objects more easily. It also increases the ability to lease things out, with payments tied to actual usage, turning the provision of physical goods into a service industry.  -  But the predictable, linear development this implies — an orderly progression that adds value to existing assets and new revenue streams to existing businesses — is not the way technology revolutions normally play out.  For a start, some of the hoped-for benefits have been slow to arrive. True, this is a long-term, highly complex change that will creep slowly into many areas of business and life, from the way cities operate to industrial, home and personal settings. In a report this week, the McKinsey Global Institute predicted that the applications of this technology would be worth $11TN a year by 2025, equivalent to 11% of the global economy by that point.  -  But McKinsey also pointed out that there was a lag in the effects of this technology, similar to the productivity lag that followed the wave of corporate IT automation that started in the 1980s. It takes time for companies to learn how to manage new technologies and for the new business models to emerge.

Part of the problem results from sheer complexity. Some 40% of the benefits from the internet of things depend on deep integration of different systems, according to McKinsey. Also, the world is already awash with data, little of which is actually used. Simply adding equipment to pile up more information will not guarantee a return, says Michael Chui, a partner at the professional services firm.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Chevrolet Adds Theft Alarm Feature: Now Your Car Can Text You If It's Being Stolen

Chevrolet Adds Theft Alarm Feature: Now Your Car Can Text You If It's Being Stolen | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
General Motors' OnStar service debuted in 1996, just as cell phones were evolving from expensive,...
Richard Platt's insight:

The feature is called "Theft Alarm Notification". Working in tandem with other OnStar services like Stolen Vehicle Slowdown, Theft Alarm Notification boosts the chances that owners will get their cars back after the bad guys (or girls) try to make off with them.  If you're an OnStar subscriber, you can opt-in to Theft Alarm Notification and select how you'd like to be notified when a would-be thief triggers your car alarm. You can choose to receive a text message, email, or phone call. Then, "OnStar advisors will work with local authorities and use GPS technology to pinpoint the vehicle’s location. In certain models, if the conditions are safe, advisors can send a signal to slow down the vehicle, aiding police officers in its recovery and preventing a potential high-speed chase."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Rakon's new frontier: the IoT

Rakon's new frontier: the IoT | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Component maker Rakon is back in growth mode, divesting commodity businesses and focusing on the next big thing.
Richard Platt's insight:

Rakon is hinting at what it describes as a "soon to be released new technology proposition" and signalling it intends to grab a chunk of emerging opportunities presented by the internet of things (IoT).  As a developer of crystal frequency control and timing technologies, Rakon is exposed to some high-growth communications markets, including the worldwide roll-out of 4G. Its components are used in wired, wireless and fibre networks, navigation devices, military systems and satellites.  Rakon said the applications of its technologies in support of the IoT are multiple, including wireless control, machine to machine, smart grids and test and measurement.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Kaspersky on Smart Fridges: 'Internet of Things? I Call It Internet of Threats'

Kaspersky on Smart Fridges: 'Internet of Things? I Call It Internet of Threats' | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In the fourth video of our six-part series, cybersecurity expert Eugene Kaspersky talks about the dangers of what he calls the "Internet of Threats."
Richard Platt's insight:

Video - not an unfair analysis of the threats to the consumer IoT space

more...
No comment yet.