Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Smart shoes alert runners on their bad habits

Smart shoes alert runners on their bad habits | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Professional runners spend hours upon hours perfecting their technique. on top of that they spend thousands of dollars on hiring trainers. People who start training to run for the first time are ofte...
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SpaceX launches mysterious Air Force space plane ahead of Irma's arrival

SpaceX launches mysterious Air Force space plane ahead of Irma's arrival | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
SpaceX completes launch of Air Force space plane ahead of Irma's arrival.
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Yeah Baby - keep in mind the whole North Korea thing is going in the same time frame as Hurricane Irma ....So....It's part of the Department of Defense's Rapid Capabilities Office, which works on technology to combat urgent national security threats. The plane is carrying "experimental payloads," according to the Air Force.  Specifically, it is has equipment to test "experimental electronics and oscillating heat pipes" during long trips in space. Heat pipes can be used on satellites to help regulate their temperature in space.

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Hackers Have Already Started to Weaponize Artificial Intelligence

Hackers Have Already Started to Weaponize Artificial Intelligence | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Last year, two data scientists from security firm ZeroFOX conducted an experiment to see who was better at getting Twitter users to click on malicious links, humans or an artificial intelligence. The researchers taught an AI to study the behavior of social network users, and then design and implement its own phishing bait. In tests, the artificial hacker was substantially better than its human competitors, composing and distributing more phishing tweets than humans, and with a substantially better conversion rate.

Via Constantin Ionel Milos / Milos Constantin
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Last year, two data scientists from security firm ZeroFOX conducted an experiment to see who was better at getting Twitter users to click on malicious links, humans or an artificial intelligence. The researchers taught an AI to study the behavior of social network users, and then design and implement its own phishing bait. In tests, the artificial hacker was substantially better than its human competitors, composing and distributing more phishing tweets than humans, and with a substantially better conversion rate.  The AI, named SNAP_R, sent simulated spear-phishing tweets to over 800 users at a rate of 6.75 tweets per minute, luring 275 victims. By  contrast,  Forbes staff writer Thomas Fox-Brewster, who participated in the experiment, was only able to pump out 1.075 tweets a minute, making just 129 attempts and luring in just 49 users.

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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, September 17, 8:49 PM

Our technology is now being used against us by the machines we built to help us. Tests show that AI-directed hacking programs are more effective and efficient than human hackers.  Get ready for singularity.

Russell Roberts

Hawaii Intelligence Digest

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Stop Leaving Your Smartphone's Bluetooth On

Stop Leaving Your Smartphone's Bluetooth On | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
If you always leave Bluetooth on your phone on, you might want to rethink things.
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PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT:    A vulnerability known as BlueBorne was discovered this week by security research firm Armis. With it, researchers were able to infiltrate Samsung Galaxy Phones and the Google Pixel as well as an LG Sports Watch and a car audio system, all by exploiting the Bluetooth connection.  Other devices are also vulnerable. Specifically, iPhones and iPads that haven’t been upgraded to iOS 10, as well as a number of other Android, Microsoft, and Linux products. A BlueBorne attack reportedly only takes 10 seconds to do and can give a hacker control of your Bluetooth-enabled device, even if it isn’t connected to anything when the attack begins.

Google and Microsoft put out security patches to get rid of the vulnerability this week. If you haven’t updated your phone in the past few days, you should go ahead and do that right now. No really, do it now.   The issue brings up a much bigger problem: you shouldn’t be leaving your Bluetooth on in the first place.

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Review: Microsoft Azure IoT Suite

Review: Microsoft Azure IoT Suite | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Azure IoT Suite can relieve the nightmare of creating infrastructure to support IoT sensors.
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The Azure IoT Suite is designed to be a quick-start type of portal—a true example of a platform as a service (PaaS) that gives you the resources necessary to deal with all of the data being sent back to you, while also allowing you to understand it, manipulate it and use it to either improve your business processes or solve some nagging problem.  NOTE: There is also a newer software as a service (SaaS) offering called Microsoft IoT Central, geared toward the software that powers the sensors and connects everything together. This offering is mainly aimed at manufacturers, who can use IoT Central to build their own SaaS-based IoT solutions hosted on the Azure IoT cloud service and get their solutions to market more quickly without having to reinvent the plumbing, the platform and more.  There’s also the very new (as in Spring 2017) Azure IoT Edge suite, a complementary offering that lets in-house or contract programmers develop logic for the small computers and sensors on the “edge” of an IoT environment in convenient, more accessible (and commonly known) languages like Java and C#, rather than Assembly and other more obscure languages. In this story, however, we will focus on the Azure IoT Suite because it more clearly highlights the capabilities of the overall platform.

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250,000 fuel tanks to join the internet of things

250,000 fuel tanks to join the internet of things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
250,000 fuel tanks around Ireland and the world could soon be connected to the internet of things via deal between VT and Dunraven.
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More than 250,000 fuel tanks around Ireland and the world could soon be connected to the internet of things (IoT) thanks to a €1m deal signed between Sigfox player VT Networks and Dunraven Systems.  Sigfox is an ultra-narrowband internet of things network operating in 32 countries worldwide.  The technology is optimized to provide a low-cost, low-power option for connecting simple devices directly to the cloud. Devices that only need to send small amounts of information can operate on battery power for up to a decade.  VT will provide 250,000 global Sigfox subscriptions to Dunraven, a leading player in the design and development of ultrasonic fuel tank monitors, equal to 35pc of the total number of machine-to-machine (M2M) subscriptions currently live in Ireland on Vodafone, Three or Eir networks.

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If Datum has its way, all your data would belong to you 

If Datum has its way, all your data would belong to you  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
This may surprise you, but your data has value. The information that you communicate through social media, through your wearable devices, throug
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If you think your data isn’t valuable, consider what companies will pay for access to your information. From personal information and buying trends, to cell phone usage and internet searches, companies are willing to pay large sums of money for access to you. In fact, brokers make more than $425 million per year by leveraging and selling data about consumers.

Bias in Datatown:  It should come as no surprise that, where this kind of money can be made, some bias exists. The data that you are producing every day (around .77 GB, according to a recent study) has substantial value, and most consumers are either not aware of the value or not aware of a way to monetize that value.

Because of the bias surrounding this information overload, large corporations are able to access and use consumer data to target market through advertising. Advertisers are willing to pay to limit their marketing to real buyers, and data storehouses like Google or Facebook reap all the benefit. The only real loser is the consumer, who is left with ‘likes’, or a few loyalty reward points.

Datum to the Rescue:  A new blockchain-based company called Datum, built on the distributed ledger of Ethereum, is seeking to change this imbalance back in favor of consumers. Datum has created a platform where users can choose to store their data securely, without risk of privacy invasion, and then sell it to buyers who are wanting access.  The platform, designed to storehouse data securely on the database, makes data distribution a personal choice. A simple app controls whether information is privatized or marketed to buyers, and all proceeds of any sold information are returned directly to the user through DATG, the digital token created by Datum.  The use cases for this system are massive for individuals and businesses alike. Consumers can choose to sell some data (perhaps social media usage), but privatize IoT device information. The choice of the consumer drives the amount of access. Businesses can also securely manage their IoT devices, controlling where data about the device and the user is kept, and who has access to it.

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Big data and digital transformation: How one enables the other 

Big data and digital transformation: How one enables the other  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Drowning in data is not the same as big data. Here's the true definition of big data and a powerful example of how it's being used to power digital transformation.
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Structured data is all of the stuff that fits in traditional spreadsheets and databases--your P&L, your customer list, information about your products and business processes, etc. Unstructured data is all of the new stuff that's often too big to fit into a database--the raw Twitter firehose, Google Trends data, public APIs from governments, and feeds from Internet of Things sensors. When you layer unstructured data on top of structured data, that's where the magic happens.

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Smart buildings: when big data meets commercial property

Smart buildings: when big data meets commercial property | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
What is big data doing in your office bathroom?
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Ras Jayawickrama of Schneider Electric said smart office systems are the key to increasing the lifecycle of commercial spaces. Ras Jayawickrama of Schneider Electric said technology is there, but its uptake suffered from building owners' shortsighted attitudes.   "[Building owners] forget to consider the entire lifecycle… we've got to be thinking about putting in innovation and technology that will tune that building 15 years down the track."  Jayawickrama said hotels had been faster than most in recognising cost benefits of remote controlled systems. "In a hotel, you multiply savings by 250 rooms… the cost adds up."

Schneider Electric has 300 workers in New Zealand and has designed smart technology systems for companies like Nestle and Fonterra. Physical devices that can be controlled through the internet include bathroom light switches, hotel HVAC systems, and roof panels that can adjust to let light into warehouses.   Victoria University school of architecture professor Michael Donn said research has shown that New Zealand commercial buildings could reduce its output levels by 40 per cent with "relatively simple refurbishment". 

Aspects of these refurbishments could be controlled by smart systems, allowing airflow from outside, or adjusting natural light, he said. 

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Lessons Learned Creating a Plant-Watering IoT Device

Lessons Learned Creating a Plant-Watering IoT Device | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
This is a follow-up to my previous article on the initial design & build process of the FloodBot. Admittedly, I left off on a bit of a cliffhanger with my results. What was meant to be just a short…
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Interesting 1st person account of creating a plant watering IoT device.  - I would think required reading for any designer of IoT devices of any ilk.   "My first addition came in the form of the RaspberryPi Camera module. While it’s true I could have used a USB webcam instead — the additional time to research and purchase a Linux-compatible USB camera (that won’t draw too much power) was not worth the trouble in my mind. The only issue now will be the waterproofing of the external module — but that’s much simpler with the small profile and thin ribbon-cable.

While we’re here, we can also take the time to refactor our logging to get the best out of our data. I opted for a simple dedicated CSV file with a scheme that uses keywords and time stamps to mark data points (in the format of: DATETIME,ACTION,DURATION). Below is a real example of the logging I generated during the FloodBot’s normal operation at home. It’s a simple enough scheme to extract any data needed in the future, as well as easily being expandable without making previous logs incompatible.

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Real-time battery monitoring fills in the data gaps

Real-time battery monitoring fills in the data gaps | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
As batteries are shuffled around a fleet, any hope of tracking them—or their abusers—is lost. Or, is it?
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“An industrial battery is rated at 2,000 cycles, from full charge to discharge, but they rarely last that long.” says Gaskell. “The only time I ever believe a customer who says they have their batteries under control is when they are getting four or five years out of them and don’t have to replace cells. But if batteries only last one or two years, they have problems. If I had to guess, maybe 80% of folks don’t have control of their batteries.” Gaskell says two pieces are key. The first is maintaining the battery when it’s charging, which a number of smart charger and battery monitoring solutions do very well. The second piece is assessing the health of the battery during use, which is a less common practice.  “It’s important to have a perspective of both sides of that equation,” Gaskell says. “A lot of charger systems are automated to protect the battery when it’s charging, but there’s not a lot to protect it from operators.”  Abuse can cause amperage spikes and raise battery temperatures, but you can’t necessarily blame the operator for the way forklifts have traditionally communicated. A blinking light tells the operator water is low, but the probe is only attached to the one cell that endures the most heat.

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Ex-CIA Agent Raises $40M To Find Every 'Thing' On The Web In Just One Hour

Ex-CIA Agent Raises $40M To Find Every 'Thing' On The Web In Just One Hour | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Peter Thiel-backed Qadium announces Series B of $40 million, as customers including Cyber Command and PayPal come on board.
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Qadium, a Peter Thiel-backed cybersecurity start-up from San Francisco, has raised a Series B of $40 million, as it expands its product that CEO and ex-CIA analyst Tim Junio claims can index almost every device connected to the public internet in just an hour.  First profiled by Forbes after it came out of stealth last year, Qadium's platform is akin to a Google Street View for the Internet of Things, helping customers find devices on their network they never knew were there and close off any loopholes that hackers might find a way through. Founded by Junio and colleagues from their days doing cyberwarfare research for the Department of Defense's research arm, DARPA, the company is now revealing  a portion of its customer list, from major  government deployments to big names in the private sector. They include a $500,000 contract with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and a sale to the U.S. Cyber Command, as well as deals with Dell, PayPal, CVS and Capitol One, amongst others.

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SiC & GaN technologies upset the traditional benchmarks of the IGBT industry 

SiC & GaN technologies upset the traditional benchmarks of the IGBT industry  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
How is the IGBT market evolving for different applications? How will the IGBT market face the adoption of high performance WBG based devices?
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 Yole Développement (Yole) expects the IGBT  (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) market to go over US$ 5 billion by 2022 with a major growth coming from IGBT power module. The high performance that SiC and GaN materials can afford is already creating a battlefield with Silicon based IGBT. To overcome this thread, Si IGBT manufacturers need to look for prompt solutions as technologically update their systems for better efficiency or to increase their IGBT portfolio offer.

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Defects in next-generation solar cells can be healed with light

Defects in next-generation solar cells can be healed with light | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Researchers have shown that defects in the molecular structure of perovskites - a material which could revolutionise the solar cell industry - can be
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The international team of researchers demonstrated in 2016 that defects in the crystalline structure of perovskites could be healed by exposing them to light, but the effects were temporary.  Now, an expanded team, from Cambridge, MIT, Oxford, Bath and Delft, have shown that these defects can be permanently healed, which could further accelerate the development of cheap, high-performance perovskite-based solar cells that rival the efficiency of silicon. Their results are reported in the inaugural edition of the journal Joule, published by Cell Press.  

In the new study, the team made a perovskite-based device, printed using techniques compatible with scalable roll-to-roll processes, but before the device was completed, they exposed it to light, oxygen and humidity. Perovskites often start to degrade when exposed to humidity, but the team found that when humidity levels were between 40 and 50 percent, and the exposure was limited to 30 minutes, degradation did not occur. Once the exposure was complete, the remaining layers were deposited to finish the device.

When the light was applied, electrons bound with oxygen, forming a superoxide that could very effectively bind to electron traps and prevent these traps from hindering electrons. In the accompanying presence of water, the perovskite surface also gets converted to a protective shell. The shell coating removes traps from the surfaces but also locks in the superoxide, meaning that the performance improvements in the perovskites are now long-lived.

“It’s counter-intuitive, but applying humidity and light makes the perovskite solar cells more luminescent, a property which is extremely important if you want efficient solar cells,” said Stranks, who is now based at Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory. “We’ve seen an increase in luminescence efficiency from one percent to 89 percent, and we think we could get it all the way to 100 percent, which means we could have no voltage loss – but there’s still a lot of work to be done.”

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Warning: CCleaner Hacked to Distribute Malware; Over 2.3 Million Users Infected

Warning: CCleaner Hacked to Distribute Malware; Over 2.3 Million Users Infected | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Avast-owned CCleaner servers hacked to distribute malicious version (5.33) for almost a month.

Via Constantin Ionel Milos / Milos Constantin
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If you have downloaded or updated CCleaner application on your computer between August 15 and September 12 of this year from its official website, then pay attention—your computer has been compromised.   CCleaner is a popular application with over 2 billion downloads, created by Piriform and recently acquired by Avast, that allows users to clean up their system to optimize and enhance performance.  Security researchers from Cisco Talos discovered that the download servers used by Avast to let users download the application were compromised by some unknown hackers, who replaced the original version of the software with the malicious one and distributed it to millions of users for around a month.  This incident is yet another example of supply chain attack. Earlier this year, update servers of a Ukrainian company called MeDoc were also compromised in the same way to distribute the Petya ransomware, which wreaked havoc worldwide. Avast and Piriform have both confirmed that the Windows 32-bit version of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected by the malware.
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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, Today, 1:26 AM

Avoid this version of CCleaner.  The software has been hacked. Over 2.3 million subscribers have downloaded malicious malware because of this defective program.  I've always used Malwarebytes for my anti-malware protection. No problems with this company, yet.

Russell Roberts

Hawaii Intelligence Digest

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Vodafone claims Internet of Things connected healthcare solutions can lower health costs

Vodafone claims Internet of Things connected healthcare solutions can lower health costs | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The new IoT based healthcare solution will improve treatment, will more effective in drug development and it will ultimately lower health costs.
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Vodafone, in a new white paper supported by Bernard Vrijens, Professor in public health at the University of Liege, claims that its new Internet of Things (IoT) connected solution health care programme can improve millions of lives and can even lower the healthcare cost.   According to the white paper, Internet of Things can lead to being a more effective healthcare as it brings together the smart devices, connectivity and the cloud. IoT brings solutions like collecting patients data from smart packaging, smart delivery, smart pills, smart diaries, smart scale and wearables, which will be stored in the cloud and further be available for doctors or patients on application software.

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Walk down Sydney's street of the future

Walk down Sydney's street of the future | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Festival to showcase smart street.
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It’s part of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects’ (AILA) national Festival of Landscape Architecture. being held on 12-15 October. The festival is billed as “a four-day celebration on conceiving, reimagining and transforming the outside world from streetscapes to parks and playgrounds, transport solutions to tourism strategies, to new suburbs and even cities.”

AILA says the Future Street, which will be open throughout the festival, will “showcase a range of landscape, IoT, utilities, transportation and urban design and place making features … supported by a program of topical discussions and case studies.”  It plans to use the installation to gather and report on real time data, highlighting the capabilities of technology, and the effectiveness of various deployed strategies.  The Future Street is a collaboration between AILA, the Internet of Things Alliance Australia (IOTAA) and the Smart Cities Council Australia New Zealand (SCCANZ).

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How GPS, drones, and apps are revolutionizing rugby

How GPS, drones, and apps are revolutionizing rugby | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Wearable technology was at the forefront of pre-season rugby training at Harlequins HQ in Guildford, UK.
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Premiership Rugby is undergoing a technological revolution and it is changing the way coaches prepare training sessions and how they analyse player performance.  Business Insider visited Harlequins Rugby Club during a pre-season training session at Surrey Sports Park in Guildford. We were given a glimpse of how Harlequins coaches use performance tracking tech to ensure players are prepared for the 2017-2018 Premiership season.

The tools include:

  1. Global Positioning System (GPS) devices — handheld systems that are placed into a pouch on the back of each player's shirt.
  2. Drones and fixed "lamppost" cameras — training sessions and live matches are filmed from unique vantage points so coaches can analyse drills and passages of play from all angles.
  3. Phone apps — players fill out surveys on a daily basis so coaches can monitor sleeping patterns and live match recovery.

Meshing sport and tech is not a new phenomenon. Aussie Rules has used GPS since 2004, Premier League football clubs also get players wearing tech during training sessions, and NFL teams have toyed with drones since 2015. Now it's rugby's turn.

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Amazon's Alexa is finally coming to wearable devices for the first time

Amazon's Alexa is finally coming to wearable devices for the first time | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Business Insider France est un site d’information sur l’économie, les technologies, les entrepreneurs, l’innovation, les découvertes et bien plus encore. En texte, en images, en vidéos et en graphiques, de l’actualité essentielle et percutante.
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Wireless accessory manufacturer Bragi is introducing support for Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant directly into its Dash and Dash Pro wireless headphones, reports TechCrunch.

Manufacturers have thus far incorporated the voice assistant into speakers, phones, thermostats, and more — but being incorporated into a wearable device is a first for Alexa.

The headphones will let users tap a button to launch the voice assistant, which will connect to the device through the user’s mobile phone and the Bragi app. They will let a wearer engage with the voice assistant while on the go, searching for basic information, shopping for goods on Amazon, or calling for a vehicle from ride-hailing services like Uber, among other possibilities. While all of these capabilities are already possible using a phone, enabling hands-free voice control brings a new level of convenience.  This is just the first instance where Alexa is being incorporated into a wearable device. Apple gives users similar functionality with its AirPod headphones, which users can tap to activate Siri

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Elon Musk shares first full-body photo of SpaceX’s spacesuit

Elon Musk shares first full-body photo of SpaceX’s spacesuit | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Elon Musk has shared a photo of the SpaceX spacesuit the company has designed in-house. This is the second photo shared by Musk of the new spacesuit design..
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This full-length shot of the suit reveals the glove and boot design for the first time, along with the pants, which feature flex zones in the knee area for mobility when bending. It also looks like there are similar padded areas in the back in black to help provide comfort while seated in the capsule.  The boots looks fairly lightweight, probably also optimized for mobility. These suits aren’t designed for extra-vehicular activity (EVA) after all – they’re created to protect the astronauts while they’re in the capsule, and when moving over to other vehicles (like the ISS) under pressurized conditions, rather than being exposed to vacuum.

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MTU premiers ship automation system for the future

MTU premiers ship automation system for the future | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
MTU premiers ship automation system for the future
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Rolls-Royce will premier the new Equipment Health Monitoring function available with MTU's Callosum Ship Automation System at the DSEI Defense and Security Exhibition in London (September 12–15). The Callosum extension provides a real-time picture of the status of the vessel and its propulsion system.  Callosum utilizes the latest analysis techniques and machine learning based on digital measurement data to prevent faults and match maintenance to actual equipment condition. As a result, maintenance needs and life-cycle costs are reduced to a minimum whilst availability and planning reliability for operational forces are increased.

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Raspberry Pi based OBD-II dongle connects your car to the cloud

Raspberry Pi based OBD-II dongle connects your car to the cloud | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Now on Kickstarter: an “AutoPi” dongle based on a 4G- and GPS-equipped Raspberry Pi Zero W that plugs into a car’s OBD-II port to enable DIY cloud services.

Via Jinbuhm Kim
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Now on Kickstarter: an “AutoPi” dongle based on a 4G- and GPS-equipped Raspberry Pi Zero W that plugs into a car’s OBD-II port to enable DIY cloud services.  A Danish startup called AutoPi.io has gone to Kickstarter to launch a Raspberry Pi Zero W based AutoPi dongle that plugs into the same OBD-II port that automotive repair people use to run diagnostics and tap other telematics features. Automotive computers used for fleet management, such as iWave’s Linux-based Connected Car Device — OBD II, connect to the same telematics port.

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Super Secret US Air Force Spaceplane Is Going Back Into Orbit This Week

Super Secret US Air Force Spaceplane Is Going Back Into Orbit This Week | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The US Air Force’s secretive X-37B spaceplane returned to Earth back in May after a mysterious two years in orbit. Nobody knows what it was doing up there, since the mission is highly classified, but it’s heading back into orbit in just a couple of days. And this time it’s getting a little help from SpaceX.
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The US Air Force’s secretive X-37B spaceplane returned to Earth back in May after a mysterious two years in orbit. Nobody knows what it was doing up there, since the mission is highly classified, but it’s heading back into orbit in just a couple of days. And this time it’s getting a little help from SpaceX.  Yes, the unmanned Boeing X-37B has completed four missions and spent a total of 2,085 days in orbit. But this is the first mission where it won’t be launched from an Atlas 5 rocket. Instead, this launch, scheduled for Thursday, will be on top of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.  SpaceX became certified to launch US military payload back in 2015, and aside from getting this spaceplane in orbit, the company will be launching satellites for the US Air Force in 2018.

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Are Drones the Next Frontier for Artificial Intelligence? 

Are Drones the Next Frontier for Artificial Intelligence?  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies have a bright future within the aviation industry. While standard use of that technology seems like it is decades away, it could be closer than you think. There have been some demonstrations: A GE Aviation engine mechanic recently tested a Wi-Fi-enabled torque wrench, using it to “optimally” …
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Artificial intelligence and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies have a bright future within the aviation industry. While standard use of that technology seems like it is decades away, it could be closer than you think. There have been some demonstrations:

  • A GE Aviation engine mechanic recently tested a Wi-Fi-enabled torque wrench, using it to “optimally” tighten bolts, as the company said.
  • Microsoft is testing a sailplane that it hopes will be able to fly itself without a motor by intelligently catching rides on naturally occurring thermals.
  • Boeing recently invested in Texas-based AI and machine-learning company SparkCognition.
  • Bombardier is spending some $700 million over the next six years to continue using IBM services, which includes IBM’s Watson.

 Another industry on the cusp of using artificial intelligence and IoT together to provide services to customers is the unmanned aircraft systems industry — as TE Connectivity’s senior manager of sensor product knowledge and training, Pete Smith, sees it.

“Drones are going to become part of IoT networks. There's no doubt about it. I think they are in a lot of places already,” Smith told Avionics. “Essentially, IoT is the proliferation of sensors to keep track of things and take data. And all these sensors take all this data and transmit it all back to these big data warehouses. Most of it is in the cloud right now.”

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Silicon solves problems for next-generation battery technology

Silicon solves problems for next-generation battery technology | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Silicon - the second most abundant element in the earth's crust - shows great promise in Li-ion batteries, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. By replacing graphite anodes with silicon, it is possible to quadruple anode capacity.
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“In our research, we were able to combine the best of nano- and micro-technologies: nano-level functionality combined with micro-level processability, and all this without compromising performance,” Researcher Timo Ikonen from the University of Eastern Finland says. “Small amounts of silicon are already used in Tesla’s batteries to increase their energy density, but it’s very challenging to further increase the amount,” he continues.

Next, researchers will combine silicon with small amounts of carbon nanotubes in order to further enhance the electrical conductivity and mechanical durability of the material.

We now have a good understanding of the material properties required in large-scale use of silicon in Li-ion batteries. However, the silicon we’ve been using is too expensive for commercial use, and that’s why we are now looking into the possibility of manufacturing a similar material from agricultural waste, for example from barley husk ash,” Professor Vesa-Pekka Lehto explains.

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Researchers validate UV light’s use in improving semiconductors

Researchers validate UV light’s use in improving semiconductors | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A discovery by two scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) could aid the development of next-generation semiconductor devices.
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A discovery by two scientists at the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) could aid the development of next-generation semiconductor devices.

The researchers, Kwangwook Park and Kirstin Alberi, experimented with integrating two dissimilar semiconductors into a heterostructure by using light to modify the interface between them. Typically, the semiconductor materials used in electronic devices are chosen based on such factors as having a similar crystal structure, lattice constant, and thermal expansion coefficients. The close match creates a flawless interface between layers and results in a high-performance device. The ability to use different classes of semiconductors could create additional possibilities for designing new, highly efficient devices, but only if the interfaces between them can be formed properly.  Park and Alberi determined that ultraviolet (UV) light applied directly to the semiconductor surface during heterostructure growth can modify the interface between two layers. 

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