Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Rescooped by Richard Platt from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Looks Promising! New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

Looks Promising! New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques responsible for memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients.

    

The research team reports fully restoring the memories of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue. They found that the treated mice displayed improved performance in three memory tasks - a maze, a test to get them to recognize new objects, and one to get them to remember the places they should avoid.
     

Alzheimer’s affects 50 million worldwide. A team from the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) have come up with a promising solution for removing the defective brain beta-amyloid and tau proteins.
     

Publishing in Science Translational Medicine, the team describes the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to move in. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so once they get past the blood-brain barrier, they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps before the blood-brain barrier is restored within a few hours.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Richard Platt's insight:

Very promising trials, now it will need to pass FDA testing, given that ultrasound has typically been shown to be non-invasive and generally harmless this does seem like something that is worth investigating.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:59 AM

I and the friends and families of those who know someone with Alzheimer's, estimated 50 million, hope this is true.  It could be the breakthrough we need with implications for huge change in the world.  ~  Deb

Rescooped by Richard Platt from JWT WOW
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SCiO: A pocket molecular sensor for all !

Scan materials or physical objects. Get instant relevant information to your smartphone. Food, medicine, plants, and more. 


Via JWT_WOW
Richard Platt's insight:

Very cool technology, applications are very wide.  Reminded me of Spock's tricorder.

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Jaqueline Urania MoraesVarjao's curator insight, December 1, 2014 11:19 AM

Here to stay....technbology to allow all of us to identify which parts/areas of our environment are actually useful to each one of us!

Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology in Business Today
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New device allows brain to Bypass Spinal Cord, move Paralyzed Limbs

New device allows brain to Bypass Spinal Cord, move Paralyzed Limbs | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
For the first time ever, a paralyzed man can move his fingers and hand with his own thoughts thanks to a new device. A 23-year-old quadriplegic is the first patient to use Neurobridge, an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, allowing voluntary and functional control of a paralyzed limb.

Via TechinBiz
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Glenn Hogan's curator insight, March 26, 2015 6:24 PM

This is a very important breakthrough in help people with paralysing injuries, to think that some of these people may yet again regain the use of their limbs through the use of this new technology and live more productive lives.

Peter Hughes's curator insight, March 27, 2015 1:41 AM

Medical research has come a very long way in the past years, and the fact that it is now possible to artificially link the brain to one's limbs is almost unbelievable. If research continues at this rate, we may soon be seeing realistic artificial limbs, and possibly even some vast improvements to artificial sight technologies.

Rescooped by Richard Platt from Tracking the Future
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Beyond the Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles

Beyond the Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from The MITRE Corporation and Harvard University have taken key steps toward ultra-small electronic computer systems that push beyond the imminent end of Moore's Law, which states that the device density and overall processing power for computers will double every two to three years.

The ultra-small, ultra-low-power control processor—termed a nanoelectronic finite-state machine or "nanoFSM"—is smaller than a human nerve cell. It is composed of hundreds of nanowire transistors, each of which is a switch about ten-thousand times thinner than a human hair. The nanowire transistors use very little power because they are "nonvolatile." That is, the switches remember whether they are on or off, even when no power is supplied to them.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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James Jandebeur's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:57 PM

It mentions that the processors can now be made smaller than a neuron, I wonder how its power compares. Still, quite a breakthrough if it works out.

aanve's curator insight, February 1, 2014 11:09 PM
www.aanve.com
Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:29 AM

Will this address our needs when we reach the physical limits of our current chip technology?