Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
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AOL acquires web development company Ashe Avenue

AOL acquires web development company Ashe Avenue | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
AOL has acquired Ashe Avenue, a company that has built web and mobile apps for AOL and other brands. Ashe Avenue cofounder and chief executive John McKinney announced the news in a letter on the company's homepage today.
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AOL has acquired Ashe Avenue, a company that has built web and mobile apps for AOL and other brands. They will be directly responsible for the innovation and engineering powering many of AOL’s largest lifestyle verticals, including AOL.com (one of the top 50 most popular sites in the US, and one of the top 200 in the world),” McKinney wrote in the letter.  Other recent AOL acquisitions include predictive analytics startup Velos. But AOL itself was acquired earlier this year by telecommunications company Verizon.

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Which is the best IoT platform?

Which is the best IoT platform? | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Apple's HomeKit, Google's Brillo, Intel's IoTivity, or Qualcomm's AllJoyn…
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Apple's HomeKit, Google's Brillo, Intel's IoTivity, or Qualcomm's AllJoyn.   IoTivity:  Operating on a constrained application protocol (CoAP), Intel's IoTivity is being proposed by the Open Internet Consortium (OIC). Middleware that's focused on security, simplicity and rapid development, IoTivity has limited platform support – it doesn't support HTTP. However, it is open source since any device manufacturer can use it (Intel has relinquished control of it to the OIC).   "A central tenet of the open source movement is the need for open standards, and IoTivity provides a reference implementation of this standard," says Fletcher. "Open standards do not oblige anyone to adopt them but rather rely on being the most compelling implementation available."   AllSeen AllJoyn:  Qualcomm's AllSeen Alliance – a breakaway from the Open Internet Consortium – is pushing the AllSeen AllJoyn standard, which is already used by Panasonic multi-room audio systems and by LG's smart TVs (both companies are members). It natively supports common platforms like iOS, OS X, and even Windows 10, though this wide support does bring some complexity. There are also some worries over security.

"From a technical point of view AllSeen AllJoyn would be the most attractive framework to work with," says Fletcher, who adds that he expects Brillo/Weave and IoTivity will eventually meet halfway, or support one another seamlessly.   Given the appearance of HomeKit and Brillo, IoTivity and AllJoy probably have a bigger future outside of the home. "IoTivity and AllJoyn will receive more attention within the industrial application sphere where the demands of the specific application will require either the interoperability of AllJoyn or the rapid development environment of IoTivity – or eventually Brillo/Weave," says Fletcher.   

Who will win?  "Apple or Google will be the first companies to achieve that, since both companies already have their own ecosystem of devices, thus a reason to push towards such technologies," says Aiginitis, who can foresee a situation where some might be using iFridges that are connected with the Apple framework of our iHome. However, Google Brillo gets the rod as the dominant smart home framework of the future. "I would personally give the lead to Google, since it recently acquired Nest and has a wider range of products under the Android family," says Aiginitis.  As always, the market will decide, but don't expect one single platform to emerge. "The vastness of the opportunities relating to IoT may well mean that there is sufficient space to support two or three dominant frameworks, as well as a range of more specialist ones," adds Fletcher.   It is, however, very early days. "Since we are only a few seconds after the starting pistol of this race sounded," says Aiginitis, "the next few years will be full of surprises."

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Philips Launches Cheaper Hue Smart Light Bulb Kit

Philips Launches Cheaper Hue Smart Light Bulb Kit | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The Philips Hue product line is great, but it's also very expensive with some starter kits costing $200. But if you really want to be able to control multiple..
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The Philips Hue product line is great, but it’s also very expensive with some starter kits costing $200. If you really want to be able to control multiple light bulbs at a time, Philips has something new for you — a $40 wireless dimming kit. In order to bring the price down, Philips had to remove a bunch of features, starting with the ability to control your lights from your phone.  Here’s how it works: The new dimming kit comes with one light bulb and a new wireless switch. This switch couldn’t be simpler. It has two big on and off buttons, and two buttons to adjust the brightness of your lightbulbs. It comes with a battery, and you can just stick to your wall without having to wire it or replace your existing switch. It’s a great way to try smart light bulbs if you are just renting your apartment.  But this switch only makes sense if you use it with multiple lights, letting you control all the lights in your room from one switch. So you’ll actually have to spend $20 for each extra Hue Lux light bulb.   Finally, the new wireless switch doesn’t come with the Hue bridge, meaning that you can use it without having to plug a tiny bridge to your router. But there are a few downsides. It means that the switch only communicates with your lights — it doesn’t connect to your Wi-Fi network. You won’t be able to control your lights from your phone or computer. You can also forget about IFTTT integration.

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Intel To Lead $100M Investment in OpenStack Cloud Company

Intel To Lead $100M Investment in OpenStack Cloud Company | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
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First rolled out in 2010, OpenStack cloud software is built by a team of open source contributors under the guidance of the OpenStack Foundation. In just five years, it has become the fifth most popular cloud platform among global companies, according to market research firm Forrester Research Inc. The latest investment aims to help spur adoption by making it easier to deploy and integrate the technology into data Relevant Products/Services centers.  -  Intel, Goldman Sachs, August Capital, Insight Venture Partners, Ericsson, Sapphire Ventures (formerly SAP Ventures) and WestSummit Capital invested in the latest round. Intel is doing more than offering cash, though. The company is collaborating with Mirantis on the technical side of the table as it works to create tens of thousands of new clouds as part of its Clouds for All initiative.  Intel’s technological insights will work to add more capabilities for enterprise deployments. Specifically, Mirantis and Intel will work to address issues like performance at scale, storage Relevant Products/Services, network integration and support for big data.  Alex Freedland, co-founder and president of Mirantis, is more than a little bullish on the prospects of its OpenStack distribution in the wake of these endorsements. With Intel as its partner, he said he is convinced Mirantis will “show the world” that open design, open development and open licensing is the future of cloud infrastructure software.

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What the 'IoT' Means For Small Business

What the 'IoT' Means For Small Business | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The Internet changed the way we do business. Now, the Internet of Things is about to do the same. How small business responds could be a make-or-break proposition. We explain why.
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Big Business, IoT, and the Risk to Small Business:  Small businesses should sit up and pay attention to the fact that big business is getting ready to adopt IoT in a big way. Companies like GE, major healthcare providers, and automotive giants have already taken strides in this direction. IoT makes it possible for them to remotely adjust equipment settings for better performance or to send a technician out to replace a failing component before the operator even notices a problem.  Another example is hospital rooms, which are filled with devices that track vital signs and alert the nursing station when something goes out of expected range. Transportation, too, is very much in the forefront of IoT. Cars with OnStar can report accidents, and they can be opened remotely. Similarly, truck systems monitor component health, maintenance schedules, and driver hours behind the wheel.   "Everything that GE builds, from a fridge to a jet engine, will be instrumented and dialing home to report their status," said Paul Maritz, CEO of IoT software provider Pivotal Software.  These major corporations are investing billions to arm their equipment with sensors and erecting supporting systems that can analyze that information immediately and glean insight. The result: more efficient operation, lower fuel consumption, more responsiveness to changes, and more than likely, a lot of small businesses struggling to compete on an even playing field. In other words, David just came out onto the field and saw Goliath get a whole lot bigger, faster, and more intelligent.  Think for a moment about such items as package delivery, home improvement, and video rental. The giants like FedEx, UPS, Home Depot, and Blockbuster/Netflix used technology to kill off entire ecosystems of small businesses. The same could roll out again with IoT—unless small businesses stay informed, figure out how to use this knowledge to their advantage, and gain a foothold in the IoT game.

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Intel Beefs Up Fight Against Cancer With Cloud Technology And Data Analytics

Intel Beefs Up Fight Against Cancer With Cloud Technology And Data Analytics | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Collaboration between Intel and OHSU will pioneer the use of next-gen computing and bio-sciences expertise to better manage and even personalize cancer care. In its pilot network called Collaborative Cancer Cloud, the partners aim to fight cancer in the quicker and less-costly way.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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In the war against cancer and in a world of continuously developing technology, expertise in genomics and biomedical imaging tied up with large-scale computing make a powerful weapon in fighting against a disease that kills millions of people all over the world.

It's faster, cheaper and personalized for patients.  At the Intel Development Forum on Aug. 17, Intel announced its collaboration with Oregon Health and Sciences University's Knight Cancer Institute through an open Platform-as-a-Service solution to managing cancer called Collaborative Cancer Cloud.   This pilot network, a platform of precision medicine analytics, will allow the secure sharing of genomic data in patients that will tailor cancer research and create personalized medicine. With the Collaborative Cancer Cloud, answers can be found quicker in possibly just days or even hours from the current time it takes, which could go from a week to months.

"It will enable large amounts of data from sites all around the world to be analyzed in a distributed way, while preserving the privacy and security of that patient data at each site," says Intel Health Strategy and Solutions General Manager Eric Dishman.  The Collaborative Cancer Cloud will aid doctors help patients by using their genome to provide diagnosis and come up with a targeted treatment plan. This multi-year collaboration envisions that by 2020 the process of diagnosis and treatment planning will then take only one day.

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Apple could choose Intel over Qualcomm for future iPhone modems

Apple could choose Intel over Qualcomm for future iPhone modems | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Qualcomm will be providing 100 percent of the modem chips for Apple's iPhone 6s, but Apple may ditch it in favor of Intel for future handsets, claims a new
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Intel being named as a possible replacement for Qualcomm is no surprise. Back in March this year, VentureBeat claimed that the iPhone 6s could use the Intel XMM 7360 LTE modem, while last week Northland Capital Markets’ Gus Richard suggested that Intel had won up to 50 percent of orders for the iPhone 6s modem.  Neither of those turned out to be the case, but today’s news suggests that there may have been some foundation to the rumors.-  Qualcomm will be providing 100% of the modem chips for Apple’s iPhone 6s, but Apple may ditch it in favor of Intel for future handsets, claims a new report.  -  Qualcomm is said to have teamed-up with TSMC to build the modem chips for the iPhone 6s, using TSMC’s 20nm process.  -  For later iPhones, however, Apple is reportedly weighing up other modem chip suppliers for future models — with Intel being a possible leader. Interestingly, the report claims that these would be for Apple’s “2017 iPhone models” which could either refer to the iPhone 7 or 7s, depending on your perspective.

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Amazon Echo adding voice controls for SmartThings devices

Amazon Echo adding voice controls for SmartThings devices | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Samsung-owned SmartThings will soon work with Amazon Echo, according to the company's now-unpublished blog post.
Richard Platt's insight:

Since part of SmartThings’ charm is its cross-platform support, that means many home automation devices which may not have got around to integrating with Echo have nonetheless been brought onboard. Amazon Echo is a voice controlled Bluetooth speaker, which is designed to be a personal assistant by doing works like helping you to answer some questions, updating you with latest news, playing music and some other stuff.    -  That includes non-SmartThings items that are plugged into a SmartThings Power Outlet, as well as switches and lights from the company. While it’s not the first such integration we’ve seen Echo add in the months since Amazon launched the chipper speaker, it could well be one of the most far-reaching, thanks to SmartThings’ broad compatibility with a huge – and growing – number of third-party automation devices.    -  The artificial intelligence (AI) speaker simply plugs into a power outlet, connects to Wi-Fi and listens for your voice so it’s ready to answer your queries. If you plan on picking up a Samsung SmartThings Hub off of Amazon (currently available through pre-order for $99), users can tell Alexa to, “Turn on the TV”. All you have to do is start your sentences with “Alexa”, which is the name of Echo’s assistant, to start controlling these devices.

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HP Stumbles on Weaker PC and Corporate Demand Before Split

HP Stumbles on Weaker PC and Corporate Demand Before Split | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Hewlett-Packard Co.’s earnings outlook fell short of estimates before a breakup designed to improve growth prospects.
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Sales declined across most divisions in the fiscal third quarter -- in personal computers, services, printers and software -- fueled by continued weakness in the global personal-computer market. For the fourth quarter -- the last before the separation in November -- profit before certain items will be $0.92 to $0.98 a share, Hewlett-Packard said Thursday, below analysts’ average projection for $1.  “We faced a challenging macroeconomic and IT spending environment in the quarter,” Chief Executive Officer Meg Whitman said on a call with analysts. In the PC and printer market, which represents around half of Hewlett-Packard’s business today, the company sees “a difficult business environment for several quarters to come,” she said.  -  By creating two businesses -- one offering technology and services to businesses, and another selling PCs, printers and other gadgets to consumers -- Whitman is seeking to make them more responsive to market changes. That’s also making them more vulnerable to swings in demand, as seen in today’s earnings results. PC shipments fell 9.5% in the second quarter, and companies are spending less on software and services.

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Trailblazers: Two women pass Army Rangers school

Trailblazers: Two women pass Army Rangers school | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver became the first two women to graduate from the U.S. Army's grueling Ranger School. Griest and Haver spoke at press conference Thursday about their achievement. CBS News correspondent David Martin reports.
Richard Platt's insight:

These two women, who are the 1st to pass the rigorous training of US Army Ranger training, by their own male classmates  were called "studs".  More than a few women have tried to go through Ranger School, none have passed before these two.  On a personal and professional note, for those who don't know me, know this, that one of my early mentors professionally was a woman, the VP of Finance a tough as nails boss who was extremely competent and she really helped me professionally with her guidance and advice, I will never be able to pay her back for that.  So in the spirit of paying it forward I've always supported the coaching and mentoring of women for higher level positions.  Gentlemen, I am going to ask you that you do likewise in your efforts   While I will always be the 1st one to seek the most competent person, for a position, if that person is a woman, do your best to help them be capable enough to fill the future positions with distinction.   Help them break the glass ceiling, we need them with us.

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Google's New OnHub Router Paves The Way For IoT

Google's New OnHub Router Paves The Way For IoT | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Google (NASDAQ:GOOGL) partners with TP-Link to launch the OnHub Router, which will eventually facilitate Internet of Things devices.
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Google announced its latest home product, the OnHub RouterGoogle, yesterday in an official blog post by Group Product Manager Trond Wuellner. The router has been developed in collaboration with TP-Link, and Google hopes the new router will address issues users face with traditional routers. In addition to better function, the OnHub Router also looks very different from a traditional router. The cylindrical design sets it apart, and it is notable for its lack of blinking lights that most routers have. The $199 device, which can be pre-ordered through the Google website, does away with cords and antennas, and has one large light on top of it. The official blog post said that the rather neat design is meant to encourage users to put the router on desks and places it can receive and transmit signals without obstruction.  -  Google said it understands extra wires and antennas on traditional routers do not add to the décor of a room, which is why most routers are placed in corners, or behind furniture. The issue with such placement is that bad placement leads to bad reception, which drastically affects Internet speeds..   The router antennas are hidden within the cylindrical design. Among the thirteen antennas the router houses, one checks for signal congestion, whereas the other 12 check overall signals. A new app for Android and iOS, Google On, replaces the blinking lights on traditional routers. The app assists users in setting up the Wi-Fi network and saves passwords that can be messaged to guests.  The Google On app can also be used to assign specific bandwidth to specific users. Hence, users can pick out favorites and decide who gets to use how much of the Internet. The router updates its software automatically, apparently without interrupting the connection, and effectively works as an Internet of Things (IoT) device, connecting various devices within the house. The router will support future IoT devices, whether they use Weave, 802.15.4 or Bluetooth Smart Ready.   Google’s router, produced  appears to be a useful tool in the IoT platform, which should receive greater focus by next year. Google has indicated that the tech giant’s partnership with TP-Link is not exclusive, since the company eventually wants to work on OnHub devices with more hardware partners. It named PC vendor ASUS as its second partner, which means Google may eventually team up with all the big names in the network and hardware space.

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Intel CEO Sees A Bright Future For IoT, Developers

Intel CEO Sees A Bright Future For IoT, Developers | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Tiny computers, real-time depth sensing, and breakthrough memory technology are among the innovations featured at this year's Intel Developer Forum. CEO Brian Krzanich detailed how connected devices will change the way we all do business.
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"For most of IDF's history, our mission was clear," said Krzanich. "We demonstrated the march of Moore's Law, previewed the next generation of Intel products, and showed our future Intel roadmap. It was a great formula, a simple one, and one that worked for a long, long time."  -  Krzanich has acknowledged that Intel is having trouble doubling chip performance every two years in accordance with Moore's Law. But there's another law that protects the company: Metcalfe's Law, which posits that the value of the network is proportional to the square of the number of users.  Though Krzanich did not invoke Metcalfe's Law during his presentation at IDF, he described a world of ubiquitous computing that cannot avoid it. As more and more objects gain computing power, through the addition of sensors, processors, and transceivers, the value of connectivity (and of the people who provide it) gets amplified by network effects. One connected car in a city isn't very useful. Ten thousand or 100,000 connected cars offer new traffic management possibilities. Add traffic sensors in the roads and clothing sensors for passengers and the possibilities proliferate.  More significantly Intel has updated its RealSense technology, which provides depth and motion information to cameras, to make real-time 3D mapping widely available. Krzanich demonstrated an Intel RealSense Smartphone with Google's Project Tango, which will be offered to developers during Q4. He also announced RealSense support will be extended beyond Android and Windows to include OS X, Robot Operating System (ROS), Linux, Scratch, Unity, XSplit, OBS, Structure SDK (iOS), OSVR, and Unreal Engine 4.   Krzanich oversaw demonstrations of a variety of Internet of Things devices:

*  The Memomi memory mirror, which allows clothing customers to see potential purchases they've tried on in different colors;
*  The Nabi clip, which can be attached to an infant (or car seat) in order to transmit a reminder that you've left the child in the car (or any place one might park a child to run an errand...the wing of an airplane, the International Space Station, you name it); and
*  An N & W vending machine that can determine your gender and age and can sense gestures so it can be operated without being touched – ideal for airports, hospitals, and germaphobes anywhere.


The advantage of devices such as the vending machine, said Krzanich, is that data gets sent to the cloud so the business owner can make improved decisions. "As you move across verticals, you can see that these end-to-end solutions provide an opportunity for the smart retail segment," he said. (As for the Nabi child abandonment sensor, perhaps technology isn't the optimal solution.)


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Best IoT devices for the connected home

Best IoT devices for the connected home | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
11 of our favourite gadgets for the smart home
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But which are the best IoT devices out there to get your humble abode kicked into the 21st century? Here are some of their favorites

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ZTE's Axon Smartphone Applies For Over 50 Patents

ZTE's Axon Smartphone Applies For Over 50 Patents | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

ZTE today announced that it has applied for over 50 new core patents for its global flagship Axon smartphone


Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
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ZTE's Axon’s innovative technology includes the smartphone’s ‘dual track’ – high fidelity sound recording and playback, as well as its dual rear-cameras that capture high resolution images and videos, with the second lens delivering advanced functionality such as sophisticated bokeh photography effects.  According to Adam Zeng, technology and innovation are of utmost importance to Chinese manufacturers wanting to achieve success in the global smartphone market.

Currently, ZTE has filed applications for more than 20,000 terminal-related patents globally, with more than 4,500 granted. In Europe and North America, ZTE has been granted more than 2,000 terminal-related patents.  In 2014, ZTE hired several research and development teams from BlackBerry, including interactivity, security and design teams. These hires strengthened ZTE’s technological innovation and patent accumulation, especially in the areas of man-machine communication and security technology.   At present, ZTE has accumulated a significant amount of patents related to voice control technology and security, including patents related to voice recognition, smart voice control and voice activation.   ZTE has pioneered a number of data protection, privacy and payment security innovations that utilize hardware and software integrated encryption technology. To date, ZTE currently has over 200 security-related patents.  - After Belkin (my Darkhorse for the IoT) seemed to falter in it's efforts in the IoT, ZTE is my smartphone Darkhorse.

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Intel's attitude change shows it wants to become the next Google

Intel's attitude change shows it wants to become the next Google | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Firm doesn't want to be known as a chip company anymore
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Intel's continued push on wearables and the Internet of Things was particularly evident at IDF last year, with wearable technology taking the driving seat in the trends leading the conference more than we've seen before. Dedicated booths lined the Moscone Centre floors, bolstering the firm's efforts to catapult us into a world of wireless, connected devices, from reference designs and products, to partnerships for smartwatches, bracelets and heart-rate monitoring headphones.  This year was no different, with more of the same and a greater emphasis on encouraging developers to make new stuff with the release of lots of new platforms. The conference centre hall was again brimming with demonstrations, proofs of concept and even startups that made it as finalists in the firm's 2014 Make It Wearable contest.   Last year Intel kicked off its annual three-day event with a keynote rich with major announcements, including a new chip architecture and a glimpse of the firm's chip roadmap and other upcoming system on chip designs that might be years away. This time was very different. There was not even one mention of Skylake, the firm's latest architecture, which it decided to unveil before the show, perhaps to take the attention away from the processor and onto other, non-chip related projects Intel is working on at the moment.  For example, the opening keynote focused heavily on Curie, Intel's Quark-powered wearable chip for IoT devices and how it could change different industries, such as sport. And there was also the announcement that Intel teamed up with Google to power Project Tango using its Real Sense 3D camera, something it would just not shut up about at IDF this year.

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Big data startup BlueData partners with Intel and takes on $20M

Big data startup BlueData partners with Intel and takes on $20M | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
BlueData, a startup with an application companies can use to run big data software like Hadoop and Spark on their existing data center infrastructure, announced today a new $20 million round of funding. The company also announced a major new partnership deal with chipmaker Intel.
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The deal comes after Intel invested hundreds of millions of dollars into Hadoop distribution vendor Cloudera last year. And earlier this year, Intel announced a partnership with Databricks, the company behind Spark.   BlueData’s technology can integrate with existing file systems other than Hadoop’s native distributed file system, and it can work on top of virtualized infrastructure, which is common in enterprises’ on-premises data centers. BlueData’s software can deploy Hadoop distributions from both Cloudera and Hortonworks. All this means choice when deploying big data software. Economical use of Hadoop and Spark can translate into more chip sales. Hence Intel’s ongoing interest in the startup.  Existing investor Intel Capital led the new round in BlueData. An unnamed new investor is also onboard, as are existing investors Amplify Partners, Atlantic Bridge, and Ignition Partners.

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Intel moves to make the IoT more secure

Intel moves to make the IoT more secure | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich announced an initiative today to make the Internet of Things more secure, starting at the chip level.
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Intel has created a protocol, dubbed Enhanced Privacy Identification, that will make Internet of Things communication and transactions more secure.  The Internet of Things is about making everyday objects smart and connected. But if those devices can be hacked, that could be a very big problem.  So the EPID technology will create a “silicon level root of trust,” Krzanich said. That means security is built in at the deepest hardware level of the system.  “We’ll make our vision of a secure Internet of Things a reality"

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IoT mapped: The emerging landscape of smart things

IoT mapped: The emerging landscape of smart things | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

No one really knows how many “things” there are deployed today that have IoT characteristics. IDC’s 2013 estimate was about 9.1 billion, growing to about 28 billion by 2020 and over 50 billion by 2025. You can get pretty much any other number you want, but all the estimates are very large. So what are all these IoT things doing and why are they there? Here’s our attempt to map out the IoT landscape (click to enlarge). Read more: click image or title.



Via Marc Kneepkens
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As you can see, there are a whole lot of possible organizational approaches to the constituent parts of IoT. We have chosen a “halo” approach, looking at how IoT principles will be applied to individual people, their surroundings (vehicles and homes), the organization of those surroundings (towns and cities and the highways and other transit systems that connect them), the range of social activities (essentially commerce, but also travel, hospitality, entertainment and leisure) that go on in those surroundings and finally the underpinnings of those activities (“industrial” including agriculture, energy and transport and logistics). We’re not claiming this is an exhaustive taxonomy (we’ve excluded all military and some law enforcement specific uses) or that this is the best way to organize things, but we think it’s a useful start and has been helpful in explaining the opportunity to the businesses we advise.   The size of the circles aren’t important. They’re basically an indication of how far away from the individual each collection of potential IoT ideas will be implemented, but even that isn’t fully consistent – there will be interactions between people and IoT ideas in the workplace as well as in the home or in the store.

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 24, 2015 6:06 AM

The Internet of Things, IoT, is growing day over day. This article gives an idea of the magnitude of what is coming.

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Smartphone sales see another boost in Q2 2015

Smartphone sales see another boost in Q2 2015 | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

The global smartphone market has seen another boost in the second quarter of the year, led by strong demand from developing markets and the release of new flagship smartphones, according to GfK’s research.


Richard Platt's insight:

The global smartphone market has seen another boost in Q2 of this year, led by strong demand from developing markets and the release of new flagship smartphones.  In total, smartphone sales grew by 5% in the previous quarter, reaching a total of 302.1 million units. Vendors brought in a combined total of $92.4 billion in revenue, up from $86 billion in the same quarter last year.  

Lower cost brands, such as Huawei, Xiaomi and Lenovo are now looking for new markets to expand to outside of their stagnating and competitive Chinese home. We will have to see how this affects the revenue and grow rates of markets in the coming year. Apple and Samsung remain the dominant brands in the high-end space, which, combined with the prevalence of lower-cost alternatives, appears to be particularly hurting high-end sales for less ubiquitous brands such as HTC, LG and Sony.  The remainder of 2015 is expected to show continued growth, with smartphone shipments expected to reach a staggering 1.3 billion units by the end of the year.

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Google and Intel bring RealSense to phones with Project Tango dev kit

Google and Intel bring RealSense to phones with Project Tango dev kit | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Intel and Google are teaming up to bring RealSense tech to Project Tango's 3D-mapping efforts.
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 The news follows Intel's unveiling of a smartphone-friendly RealSense sensor back in April -- up until then it was mainly something we saw on laptops and all-in-one PCs -- as well as a Project Tango phone concept from Qualcomm. Along with the Project Tango tablet dev kit Google unveiled last year, the RealSense-powered kit should give developers a better idea of how to create 3D-mapping apps. We're still in the early stages of depth-sensing technology, but it has the potential to improve the way we handle things like indoor mapping, scanning environments or creating VR spaces. Intel says the dev kits will be sent out to Android developers at the end of the year.

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Intel CEO wants its technology in every device (even golf clubs)

Intel CEO wants its technology in every device (even golf clubs) | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
With spider robots and BMX bike stunts taking the stage at the opening keynote for this year's Intel Developer Forum (and hardly any details about actual
Richard Platt's insight:

While Intel's interest in wearables is much more immediate, its investment in RealSense is a bet on the future -- a sign that the company plans to cover as many bases as it can. When asked to sum up Intel's overall direction, Krzanich was ambitious: "You'll see Intel in every kind of device. From mirrors, to drones, to PCs and datacenters." And, yes, even spider robots.

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Online Trust Authority IoT group issues privacy and security framework

Online Trust Authority IoT group issues privacy and security framework | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

The contents of the draft framework focus, among others, on the following main categories:

  1. Increase of transparency towards users on accessibility of privacy notice and information on processed data;
  2. Limitations on entities to whom data is communicated and on data storage period;
  3. Individuals’ rights of control on processed data including right to either remove it or require its anonymization;
  4. Security measures to protect processed data which shall include, among others,
    • data and protocols encryption,
    • change and recovery of passwords,
    • performance of penetration tests,
    • manufacturers’ ability to remediate vulnerabilities in a prompt and reliable manner and
    • adoption of a breach response and consumer safety notification plan.

There is a general feeling indeed that:

  • Current privacy regulations are excessively burdensome and might hinder the growth of IoT technologies;
  • The Internet of Things sector needs more certainty on applicable obligations as otherwise the current unclear legal scenario might delay the development/launch of products due to the potential legal risks and
  • Such additional certainty needs to be the result of a joined initiative of the industry and regulators to ensure that  privacy and security obligations are imposed in a manner that protects individuals ensuring at the same time that the potentials of the sector are not hampered.

There is a general feeling that:
*  Current privacy regulations are excessively burdensome and might hinder the growth of IoT technologies;
*  The Internet of Things sector needs more certainty on applicable obligations as otherwise the current unclear legal scenario might delay the development/launch of products due to the potential legal risks and
*  Such additional certainty needs to be the result of a joined initiative of the industry and regulators to ensure that privacy and security obligations are imposed in a manner that protects individuals ensuring at the same time that the potentials of the sector are not hampered.


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The real cost of downtime to retailers, and the importance of failover

The real cost of downtime to retailers, and the importance of failover | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Retail IT teams are under increasing pressure to build and maintain a flexible, scalable network which can support the latest retail technologies – at the core of which is a reliable, secure and superfast connectivity solution. In this brand new infographic, Westbase takes a look at the real cost of downtime and the importance of ...

Via IoT Business News
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Sacha Kakad, Managing Director of Westbase Technology, said:

“The adoption of omnichannel strategy in retail stores necessitates the implementation of new technologies such as the Internet of Things and Cloud, which has created a tipping point for the demands on retailer networks and, in particular, their connectivity.”   “This demand means that a flexible connectivity solution is now paramount to networking success – as the reliance on connectivity increases, the cost of downtime escalates also.”   -  Regardless of the fact that PoS downtime alone is estimated to cost retailers an average of $4,700 per minute, many retailers still lack an easy-to-use failover solution for their stores, meaning downtime continues to pose a problem with common causes ranging from human error to construction incidents and bad weather. It is not a question of whether connectivity will go down, but instead a question of when and how well prepared the retailer is for it.   -  Securing their connection is the only sensible option for retailers if they are to avoid the escalating costs of connection downtime. With multiple failover options available to them though, it is even more important that they select the right retail failover solution.   Secondary fixed line options such as MPLS, while offering some benefits, cannot always meet the requirements of today’s shifting retail networks. LTE mobile networking solutions however offer a more flexible, scalable and rapid deployment option for failover.  The advent of LTE has brought with it a new age of mobile networking. Five times faster than 3G, and offering increased capacity, 4G failover can now support the connectivity demands of even the most advanced applications. This enables the solution to keep the entire store online when the primary connection fails, and not just the business critical applications – minimising downtime impact across all areas and therefore losses.

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Intel is betting on the IoT to boost its marketing mojo

Intel is betting on the IoT to boost its marketing mojo | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Can a reality TV show sell servers? You betcha!
Richard Platt's insight:

Intel has always been good at marketing. Remember the dancing factory workers in their multi-colored bunny suits? Well, a new reality show produced by Mark Burnett, the guy behind The Apprentice and Survivor, will star people using Intel chips to make Internet-connected devices. It’s just one example of how the chip giant is focusing its marketing muscle on the so-called Internet of things, the emerging technology category that involves connecting locomotives, coffee makers and factories online.  And why wouldn’t it? According to Gartner, the analyst firm, the term is at the peak of the hype cycle. Many companies are pushing sexy technology, from watches to life-saving devices such as the clip on car-seat monitor that prevents parents from leaving their baby strapped into a hot car. Intel showed all of that, plus dancing spider robots off at its Intel Developer Forum this week in San Francisco. But for anyone expecting news about the latest chip architecture, CEO Brian Krzanich’s Tuesday keynote was short on details. Instead of dwelling on his company’s workhorse server and laptop chips, he went heavy on Internet of things, or IoT, pizzazz.  “This is the first time in a long time I can remember that the data center wasn’t really mentioned at all,” Patrick Moorhead of research firm Moor Insights and Strategy. “It was all about IoT for the most part, and in an area where [Intel] isn’t recognized as the leader.” Intel is keeping the emphasis on the Internet of things because the phrase encompasses so much as to be meaningless in the hands of clever marketers. It’s also a bonanza for the chip industry because every connected device requires more sensors, radios so it can talk to the Internet and microprocessors to sort through the data it gathers. All that information is then sent across a network full of computer equipment and into a giant server farm where it is analyzed and stored. 

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Will Google Brillo shake the smart home to its very foundations?

Will Google Brillo shake the smart home to its very foundations? | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
All hail a new Internet of Things platform for the home
Richard Platt's insight:

The Internet of Things is a mess, with standards and protocols up in the air and almost every tech company on the planet claiming that it's their language that the future IoT will rely on. Who wants separate apps to control lighting, heating, security cameras, the TV and the hi-fi?   -  Whether we need yet another wannabe Internet of Things platform promising to be the unifier is questionable, but there's no doubt that Google's Brillo – a new operating system for low-powered devices that will shortly be previewed to developers – could be the platform that at last brings standardisation to the IoT.  - I am not convinced, not yet anyway.


How significant is Google Brillo?   "It's real validation that IoT is here to stay," says Nav Dhunay CEO and founder of Ambyint, which develops IoT systems. "We've now got a powerhouse technology company, Google, backing IoT and making it easier for organisations to build an IoT-based product/platform."  It's surely Google's status that is the most important aspect – what Google says, goes. "We're extremely pleased to see what can generally be quite a disparate set of implementation standards become something more standardised," says Mike Crooks, head of Mubaloo Innovation Lab, which works on location-targeted technology.   "When it's driven by a major player such as Google, we can be sure that issues we've faced with proprietary standards will be reduced," says Crooks, who compares Brillo with iBeacons. "With beacons, if Apple hadn't produced a standard for the technology, the technology wouldn't have taken off as it has – and Brillo has the potential to do the same for IoT standardisation as Apple did with beacons."

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