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How Underdogs Can Win

How Underdogs Can Win | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Online version of the weekly magazine, with current articles, cartoons, blogs, audio, video, slide shows, an archive of articles and abstracts back to 1925
Richard Platt's insight:

A lengthy but worthwhile read from Malcom Gladwell - Bottom Line: Don't play by the other guys' rules and you can win 63.5% of the time, this is based on you and your firm's capability not necessarily the effort, and only in specific areas of your opponent's blind spots

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 22, 2014 8:22 AM

Yes, long story, but really interesting. Change the way the game is played, or the business is done, and you increase your chances of winning.

Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
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Many CEOs Aren’t Breakthrough Innovators (and That’s OK)

Many CEOs Aren’t Breakthrough Innovators (and That’s OK) | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Chief executives have found other ways to create value.
Richard Platt's insight:

In high-tech and fashion retail, more CEOs have a product development background than in pharma (around 60% in both industries), but we found that breakthrough innovation for public companies in these industries is rare; most happen pre-IPO. Instead, public companies are mostly exploiting and improving upon past breakthroughs, not coming up with new ones. In this context, CEOs with technical backgrounds don’t necessarily achieve higher shareholder returns than those without. But with rapidly changing technologies and consumer preferences, having the right specialist experience can help CEOs keep their companies and their offerings relevant.


SUGGESTIONS:

How Does Your CEO rate as a breakthrough innovator?  

What have they done to actually warrant this usually self promoting and self-aggrandizing statement?  


One cannot manage what one does not measure, and this includes CEO's / Senior VP's who like to say they are about the "innovation thingy", yet don't have the skills, experience or background, that demonstrates that is a fact.


Admitting the truth of yourself, others or a situation is not a sign of being a failure or even failing, it is a sign of strength, humility and respect for yourself and others, and it is a way through to rectifying the issue at hand.


If on the other hand you might need to rethink over-reaching when making such statements, that you're a innovator, or even a breakthrough innovator, or at least hire real honest to goodness Serial Innovators to help the firm to be innovative, - Just saying...

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Ford intends to integrate wearable technology into vehicles

Ford intends to integrate wearable technology into vehicles | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Wearable technology is becoming extremely popular, particularly when it comes to various types of health and fitness trackers, though smartwatches
Richard Platt's insight:

According to the vehicle design and infotronics global manager at Ford Research and Advanced Engineering, Gary Strumolo, “Wearable technology integrated with the vehicle allows for more accurate biometric data to stream continuously and alert active driver-assist systems to become more sensitive if the driver shows signs of compromised health or awareness.” It will be interesting to see how such technology fares in safety testing when it comes time to release it.

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Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, March 30, 3:04 AM

According to the vehicle design and infotronics global manager at Ford Research and Advanced Engineering, Gary Strumolo, “Wearable technology integrated with the vehicle allows for more accurate biometric data to stream continuously and alert active driver-assist systems to become more sensitive if the driver shows signs of compromised health or awareness.” It will be interesting to see how such technology fares in safety testing when it comes time to release it.

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Vacuum-maker Dyson is reportedly working on an electric car

Vacuum-maker Dyson is reportedly working on an electric car | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
UK-based vacuum maker Dyson is possibly working on an electric car, according to government documents that may have accidentally disclosed this information. According to The Guardian, th
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UK-based vacuum maker Dyson is possibly working on an electric car, according to government documents that may have accidentally disclosed this information. According to The Guardian, the UK government says it will shell out £174 million — or $246 million —€” in taxpayer funding to Dyson to develop "a new battery electric vehicle at their headquarters in Malmesbury, Wiltshire." The company would create 500 jobs, mostly in engineering, but more importantly it would join of the ranks other untraditional automakers like Apple and Google in building a new generation of clean-powered cars.
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Google wins over its biggest cloud customer yet: Apple - Silicon Valley Business Journal

Google wins over its biggest cloud customer yet: Apple - Silicon Valley Business Journal | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Apple is reportedly spending between $400 and $600 million for the services and will cut back on its dependency on Amazon Web Services.
Richard Platt's insight:

Apple recently began storing part of its iCloud and service data with Google’s cloud platform, according to CRN, citing sources close to the situation. Apple is spending between $400 and $600 million for the services. As a result, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker will cut back on its   A shift toward Google could indicate that Apple is in the midst of liberating its data from its competitors. Apple indicated on its earnings call in February that it is planning on building more of its own data centers, Apple has plans to open three new data centers within the next two years, giving the company a total of seven data centers globally. According to Re/Code, the team working on the project is known internally as “McQueen,” a reference to Steve McQueen in the film “The Great Escape.” The nickname alludes to Apple’s plan to break free from its competitors’ cloud services.  "We believe this build is a signal that Apple is increasingly likely to move away from AWS in the next 18-24 months,"dependency on Amazon Web Services (AWS), per the report.  

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TDI Group's curator insight, March 22, 8:14 AM

Apple recently began storing part of its iCloud and service data with Google’s cloud platform, according to CRN, citing sources close to the situation. Apple is spending between $400 and $600 million for the services. As a result, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker will cut back on its   A shift toward Google could indicate that Apple is in the midst of liberating its data from its competitors. Apple indicated on its earnings call in February that it is planning on building more of its own data centers, Apple has plans to open three new data centers within the next two years, giving the company a total of seven data centers globally. According to Re/Code, the team working on the project is known internally as “McQueen,” a reference to Steve McQueen in the film “The Great Escape.” The nickname alludes to Apple’s plan to break free from its competitors’ cloud services.  "We believe this build is a signal that Apple is increasingly likely to move away from AWS in the next 18-24 months,"dependency on Amazon Web Services (AWS), per the report.  

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Everything to Know About Sony's PlayStation VR Headset

Everything to Know About Sony's PlayStation VR Headset | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Sony's PlayStation VR virtual reality headset is coming out this year.
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More than 50 games will be available for the PlayStation VR this year  The device will compete with similar headsets from companies like Oculus and HTC. But instead of requiring a high-end, $1,000+ PC, PlayStation VR will be powered by users’ PlayStation 4 gaming consoles. The headset allows gamers to play titles in a more expansive and immersive environment.  The PlayStation VR will launch in October of this year for $399

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Haridasgowra's curator insight, March 16, 11:59 PM

More than 50 games will be available for the PlayStation VR this year  The device will compete with similar headsets from companies like Oculus and HTC. But instead of requiring a high-end, $1,000+ PC, PlayStation VR will be powered by users’ PlayStation 4 gaming consoles. The headset allows gamers to play titles in a more expansive and immersive environment.  The PlayStation VR will launch in October of this year for $399

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Obama calls on tech industry at SXSW to help solve nation's problems

Obama calls on tech industry at SXSW to help solve nation's problems | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
AUSTIN -- President Obama on Friday called on the tech industry to help solve some of Washington's thorniest problems -- from upgrading outdated federal networks to connecting rural classrooms to resolving the national privacy vs.
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President Obama called on the tech industry Friday to help solve some of Washington's thorniest problems — from upgrading outdated federal networks to connecting rural classrooms to resolving the national privacy vs. security debate sparked by the current legal battle between Apple and the FBI.  "The reason I’m here is to recruit all of you," he said. "We can start coming up with new platforms, new ideas across disciplines and across skill sets to solve some of the big problems we’re facing today."

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Google is reportedly working with Vizio on Cast-ready TVs

Google is reportedly working with Vizio on Cast-ready TVs | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Google has tried reworking Google TV into Android TV, but we're still not seeing the platform embedded in many more new TVs that were announced at launch. Now,...
Richard Platt's insight:
Google has tried reworking Google TV into Android TV, but we're still not seeing the platform embedded in many more new TVs that were announced at launch. Now, according to a report from Variety, the company could try convincing manufacturers to build Chromecast-like receiving directly into TV sets. The first rumored partner is Vizio, which could be looking for a new edge in smart TVs with Yahoo shutting down its platform, and the possibility of an Android tablet remote. Vizio tried building its own Android tablet before, but packing one in with each new TV would be a step further.  Users have asked for a lighter (or non-existent) smart TV experience, and switching to casting with smarts offloaded to a tablet, or phone, might be the best way to do that. Android TVs already support casting, but including the functionality of the popular dongle in brand news TVs should get the tech in front of more people. As long as that means more WiFi-connected TVs, then for Vizio that means more opportunities to monitor viewing with its InScape technology.
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Takudzwa Kunaka's curator insight, March 10, 5:47 AM
Google has tried reworking Google TV into Android TV, but we're still not seeing the platform embedded in many more new TVs that were announced at launch. Now, according to a report from Variety, the company could try convincing manufacturers to build Chromecast-like receiving directly into TV sets. The first rumored partner is Vizio, which could be looking for a new edge in smart TVs with Yahoo shutting down its platform, and the possibility of an Android tablet remote. Vizio tried building its own Android tablet before, but packing one in with each new TV would be a step further.  Users have asked for a lighter (or non-existent) smart TV experience, and switching to casting with smarts offloaded to a tablet, or phone, might be the best way to do that. Android TVs already support casting, but including the functionality of the popular dongle in brand news TVs should get the tech in front of more people. As long as that means more WiFi-connected TVs, then for Vizio that means more opportunities to monitor viewing with its InScape technology.
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Google surpasses Apple as world's most valuable company

Google surpasses Apple as world's most valuable company | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
After beating Wall Street expectations for the fourth quarter of 2015, Google umbrella company Alphabet usurped Apple as the most valuable company in the world on Monday in after hours trading.
Richard Platt's insight:

For the fourth quarter, Alphabet raked in $21.3 billion in total sales and adjusted profits of $8.67 for every Class A share, the company said in a prepared statement. Total sales were up 18 year over year, while advertising revenue was up 17 percent for the same period.   Alphabet is seeing a renaissance in growth as its advertising business made big gains this quarter. The company's services division also saw wider adoption including Gmail, which passed one billion users in quarter four. Under the Alphabet umbrella, Google's "moonshot" projects" — Wi-Fi balloons, self-driving cars, glucose-reading contact lenses, human longevity — saw advancements, but cost the firm more than $3.56 billion over the last three months of 2015.   Apple, meanwhile, is losing ground after sitting as the world's most valuable company for more than three years. The iPhone maker reached the position in 2011 and throughout most of 2012 before being unseated by Exxon in 2013. Apple retook the lead later that year.   Despite bringing in revenue of $75.9 billion in a record-breaking first quarter, Apple stock is shedding value amid iPhone growth concerns and quickly diminishing iPad sales. For the current quarter, Apple expects year-over-year iPhone unit sales to decline for the first time since the handset launched in 2007.

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FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Pokes Hornet’s Nest As Cable Industry Torches Cable Box Proposal

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Pokes Hornet’s Nest As Cable Industry Torches Cable Box Proposal | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
It’s hard to believe that anyone in the United States expects the cable industry to react quickly to anything; be it customer complaints, innovation, or even something as simple as showing up on time for a scheduled service appointments. However, if you threaten a steady revenue stream for America’s cable giants, there’s sure to be a swift
Richard Platt's insight:

As you might expect, the cable industry is fuming mad and issued lightning quick retorts to the proposal. According to the cable industry: The proposal, like prior federal government technology mandates, would impose costs on consumers, adversely impact the creation of high-quality content, and chill innovation. It also flies in the face of the rapid changes that are occurring in the marketplace and benefitting consumers. — Mark Hess, Comcast SVP, Office of the Chief Technology Officer, Business and Industry Affairs.  Customers that want to keep the status quo and rent a cable box could still do so if they wish. In essence, it would be similar to what’s possible now with Internet service provided by cable companies — you can either rent a cable modem or purchase your own and save on monthly rental fees. The only difference between the FCC proposal and the cable companies offering is that you’d pay a relatively low, one-time cost for the hardware (which would pay for itself in roughly a year if we take into account monthly cable box rental fees) instead of paying the same $7.43 monthly (a fee that has risen 185 percent in the past twenty years) for the rest of your life.  FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is showing a rather icy resolve to this blowback from the cable industry and exhibits no signs of melting under pressure. He hit back hard, saying the FCC proposal is "all about whether the standard for set-top boxes should be a closed standard or an open standard.  "99% of pay-TV customers lease set-top boxes from there cable, satellite, or telco providers. There is no competitive market." Wheeler went on to reiterate that the cost of cable box hardware and rental fees have skyrocketed while the price of other consumer electronics (like PCs and smartphones) have decreased by 90 percent during the same time period.  - Me thinks the Cable Companies doth protest too much



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Apple loses more ground to Google's Chromebook in education market

Apple loses more ground to Google's Chromebook in education market | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Microsoft leads worldwide, but school districts are moving to lower-cost devices.
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The 5 coolest things Samsung unveiled at CES 2016

The 5 coolest things Samsung unveiled at CES 2016 | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The annual Consumer Electronics Show is the biggest consumer tech event of the year, and Samsung typically has the biggest presence among large CE companies at the show.
Richard Platt's insight:

Samsung’s new SUHD TVs cover all sizes up to 89 inches and where smart features are concerned, the new high-end TVs all feature smart home elements from Samsung’s SmartThings platform in addition to standard smart TV features like app support. I see a lot of strategic moves by Samsung with their latest offerings in the SUHD line up, these could break new ground that other firms have yet to be able to match, at least on the high end.

Samsung Galaxy TabPro S:  The new notebook features a smart design, lightweight build and a beautiful 12-inch Super AMOLED display with 2K resolution. The tablet itself is 6.3 millimeters thick and weighs just 693 grams, yet it packs a battery that can deliver up to 10.5 hours of usage per charge.

Samsung rink: Samsung’s Gear VR is one of the most fun new products we’ve used in the past couple of years, created in partnership with the virtual reality experts at Oculus. Now, Samsung’s new rink controllers push things to the next level.

Samsung Welt:  is a smart wearable healthcare belt that looks like a normal belt, thus offering consumers a more discreet way of using smart sensor technology to monitor their health,” Samsung said in a blog post. WELT is capable of recording the user’s waist size, eating habits and the number of steps taken, as well as time spent sitting down. It then sends this data to a specially-designed app for analysis, and the production of a range of personalized healthcare and weight management plans.” fitness bands don’t really blend well with formal wear, this makes it easier to use such a device.

Family Hub Refrigerator:  A $5,000 fridge? Seriously?  I am reserving comment on the value add of this technology, given that I can appreciate that there are other technologies that need to be enabled outside of the fridge to really make it work well for consumers.

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Samsung is securing its smart TVs before they control your house

Samsung is securing its smart TVs before they control your house | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Samsung has announced a new "three-layer security solution" named GAIA for its range of smart TVs, with the aim of securing information stored on the devices themselves (e.g. account passwords and...
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Samsung has announced a new "three-layer security solution" named GAIA for its range of smart TVs, with the aim of securing information stored on the devices themselves (e.g. account passwords and credit card information) as well as data transmitted "between the TV and [Internet of Things] service servers."  This last point is particularly important given the company's recently-announced plans to turn its smart TVs into hubs for IoT devices around your home. Yesterday, Samsung said its range of premium SUHD TVs will work with any SmartThings compatible devices from 2016, meaning that in the future, your Samsung TV could control everything from security cameras to lighting and motion sensors. This makes securing the TV itself even more important — in a network of connected devices, the whole chain is only as secure as the weakest link.  In many ways, making the TV into a sort of central control panel for your super-smart home makes a lot of sense. It (probably) occupies a central position in one of your rooms at home, it's got a big screen, and you're not going to misplace it. However, smart TVs including Samsung's have already been criticized for their ability to spy on users, so security systems like GAIA have quite a lot to prove before they'll be fully trusted.

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Google and Ford to build self-driving car company, report claims

Google and Ford to build self-driving car company, report claims | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Google is planning to announce a partnership with Ford to create an independent company that will build self-driving cars, according to a report.
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Google and Ford plan to announce at CES that they will partner to create an independent company to build autonomous vehicles.  According to three sources "familiar with the plans" believe Ford will announce the partnership in January at the Consumer Electronics Show. Neither Ford nor Google would confirm the partnership plans.  Jeremy Carlson, a senior analyst with IHS Automotive, said during a webcast last week that Google is serious about spinning off a separate autonomous car company. Carlson said sources believed Google would develop service-only vehicles and not a traditional car manufacturing business.

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Verizon IoT Report: Revenue Growth No. 1 Driver

Verizon IoT Report: Revenue Growth No. 1 Driver | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Verizon’s M2M director weighs in on the company’s new IoT report, ThingSpace’s success, why hardware standards need to be approached with caution and more.
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"Connectivity is our foot in the door," said Mary Beth Hall, director, connected solutions, M2M product marketing for Verizon, in a briefing. "We're going to grow from there."  Hall cited a range of real-world use cases, including property management software maker BuildingLink.com working with a luxury high-rise to notify tenants when there’s open equipment in the onsite gym or laundry area. The app was built on the ThingSpace platform using APIs and sensors placed on washers and dryers and treadmills.  "We are really simplifying the ability to create IoT applications for our partners and customers," said Hall, adding that there are now 5,000 developers and 2,000 partners in the ecosystem. On the horizon are a ThingSpace Market, where coders and Verizon can sell IoT solutions, and a ThingSpace Portal for over-the-air software releases to IoT devices where manual upgrades aren't practical.

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When Will We Be Able to Trust the Internet of Things?

When Will We Be Able to Trust the Internet of Things? | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Regardless of all the buzz around the Internet of Things, the promised connectivity won't mean much until it works all the time.
Richard Platt's insight:

Indeed, while IoT is presently a very immature set of technologies, much more is coming, no doubt about it. But before we get too enamored with this latest shiny object, let’s ask a few fundamental questions.   -  IoT assumes, in almost every case, either that (a) everything works correctly all the time, or (b) we can tell that it’s not working correctly and ignore it until it’s fixed. Underlying these seemingly reasonable assumptions is the belief that we can trust all the smart connected devices in the IoT world to tell us the truth about what they’re doing all the time. If that’s not the case, a device’s “reputation” — the reliability of the data it provides — can disappear quickly and be very hard to regain.  That’s a tougher problem than you might think. Talk to IoT skeptics and you hear a lot of concerns about devices that don’t do something they are supposed to do at the moment they are supposed to do it, or about devices that do something they are not supposed to do at any point in time. Both of those concerns about “bad behavior” suggest that there is a new frontier in IoT, a frontier that goes well beyond what we generally think about with regard to security — and probably beyond what we have thought about privacy as well.

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Redbox could launch a streaming service again

Redbox could launch a streaming service again | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Redbox, the operator of DVD rental kiosks found in supermarkets and convenience stores, is reportedly attempting to launch a video streaming service again.
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Redbox, the operator of DVD rental kiosks found in supermarkets and convenience stores, is reportedly attempting to launch a video streaming service again.  The Oakbrook Terrace, Ill., company is testing a new platform called Redbox Digital, which will compete with established video-on-demand services such as Netflix, Amazon and Apple, according to a report in Variety on Thursday citing unnamed sources.

Redbox declined to confirm the news and said in a statement: “Redbox continually looks for ways to enhance our customer experience while maintaining our priority of managing our business for profitability and cash flow. ... As such, we regularly conduct tests of potential offerings, as part of our ongoing commitment to provide value for our stakeholders.”  Redbox shuttered its first streaming service in 2014 after only 18 months. Redbox Instant, a partnership with Verizon, charged $6 a month to watch movies online, but the service proved unprofitable.  Analysts say Redbox struggled to compete with Netflix, which offered subscribers a wider array of content.  Redbox faces even more competition with the rise of Amazon’s streaming video platform, not to mention Netflix’s successful original programming.

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Alphabet may ditch Boston Dynamics and its robot dreams

Alphabet may ditch Boston Dynamics and its robot dreams | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Frustrated with Boston Dynamics’ slow pace in building a marketable product, Google’s parent company Alphabet is apparently looking to unload robotics pioneer Boston Dynamics, which it acquired a little more than two years ago.
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Frustrated with Boston Dynamics’ slow pace in building a marketable product, Google’s parent company Alphabet is apparently looking to unload robotics pioneer Boston Dynamics, which it acquired a little more than two years ago.

Alphabet is cutting its losses and looking to unload the company, according to a Bloomberg report. The company is known for its four-legged Big Dog and a slow-moving humanoid robot that became a video sensation.  Citing unnamed sources, Bloomberg also reported that Toyota Research Institute, a division of Toyota Motor Corp., and Amazon.com, which uses robots in its warehouses, are potential buyers.  Google bought Boston Dynamics with just a few weeks left in 2013 as part of a wide-ranging shopping spree of robotics companies.  The question remains, however, that if Alphabet sells Boston Dynamics, does that mean the company is backing away from robotics all together or simply offloading this one piece.

“If they're selling Boston Dynamics, it would seem to me they're moving away from robotics, as strange as that might sound,” said Jeff Kagan, an independent industry analyst. “I would think if Google was still interested in robotics, it would hang on to Boston Dynamics and possibly make another acquisition for shorter-term realization.”

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Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, March 18, 3:24 AM

Frustrated with Boston Dynamics’ slow pace in building a marketable product, Google’s parent company Alphabet is apparently looking to unload robotics pioneer Boston Dynamics, which it acquired a little more than two years ago.

Alphabet is cutting its losses and looking to unload the company, according to a Bloomberg report. The company is known for its four-legged Big Dog and a slow-moving humanoid robot that became a video sensation.  Citing unnamed sources, Bloomberg also reported that Toyota Research Institute, a division of Toyota Motor Corp., and Amazon.com, which uses robots in its warehouses, are potential buyers.  Google bought Boston Dynamics with just a few weeks left in 2013 as part of a wide-ranging shopping spree of robotics companies.  The question remains, however, that if Alphabet sells Boston Dynamics, does that mean the company is backing away from robotics all together or simply offloading this one piece.

“If they're selling Boston Dynamics, it would seem to me they're moving away from robotics, as strange as that might sound,” said Jeff Kagan, an independent industry analyst. “I would think if Google was still interested in robotics, it would hang on to Boston Dynamics and possibly make another acquisition for shorter-term realization.”

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Bosch Joins Internet Of Things Race With New IoT Cloud Service

Bosch Joins Internet Of Things Race With New IoT Cloud Service | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Bosch joins the cloud computing bandwagon by becoming a full service provider for connectivity and the Internet of Things. The company aims to have all of its electronics IoT- enabled through IoT Cloud by the year 2020.
Richard Platt's insight:

Bosch is launching its own cloud computing services for the Internet of Things, with the first cloud facility to be located in Germany.  The company is the latest to join the IoT bandwagon by becoming a full service provider for connectivity and the Internet of Things.  Currently, there are at least 5 million devices that are working with Bosch's IoT Suite. These include the staples of a connected home such as a central hub and contact sensors between the door and window.  Outside the home, the company's IoT Suite also includes connected parking spots that allow consumers to reserve a spot prior to arriving, and auto-racing applications that could monitor essential racecar details even in a distance through a pit crew.

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Liliana Luna Gomez's curator insight, March 16, 4:11 AM

Bosch is launching its own cloud computing services for the Internet of Things, with the first cloud facility to be located in Germany.  The company is the latest to join the IoT bandwagon by becoming a full service provider for connectivity and the Internet of Things.  Currently, there are at least 5 million devices that are working with Bosch's IoT Suite. These include the staples of a connected home such as a central hub and contact sensors between the door and window.  Outside the home, the company's IoT Suite also includes connected parking spots that allow consumers to reserve a spot prior to arriving, and auto-racing applications that could monitor essential racecar details even in a distance through a pit crew.

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, March 17, 11:52 PM

Bosch is launching its own cloud computing services for the Internet of Things, with the first cloud facility to be located in Germany.  The company is the latest to join the IoT bandwagon by becoming a full service provider for connectivity and the Internet of Things.  Currently, there are at least 5 million devices that are working with Bosch's IoT Suite. These include the staples of a connected home such as a central hub and contact sensors between the door and window.

 

It is interesting to see that companies in the non technology space - like Bosch - are investing heavily to be positioned for the year 2020, where they expect IoT devices to start taking hold. What are all the others doing?

Juan Ortega's curator insight, May 20, 4:50 AM
¿Lavavajillas con acceso a internet? ¿Será buena idea?
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Intel buys 3D firm Replay for sports tech

Intel buys 3D firm Replay for sports tech | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Intel took another step into what CEO Brian Krzanich has called the digitization of sports with the purchase of 3-D video technology firm Replay Technologies on Wednesday.
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Intel took another step into what CEO Brian Krzanich has called the digitization of sports with the purchase of Israeli 3D video technology firm Replay Technologies on Wednesday.

Intel has been focusing on finding new technologies that make use of its chips and has been working with Tel Aviv-based Replay since 2013.  At an NBA All-Star weekend in February, Intel used Replay’s “free dimensional” or freeD video on TV and online. The tech creates “a seamless 3D video rendering of the court using 28 ultrahigh-definition cameras positioned around the arena and connected to Intel-based servers. This system allowed broadcasters to give fans a 360-degree view of key plays,”.

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Samsung SmartThings Hub review: an Internet of Things to rule them all?

Samsung SmartThings Hub review: an Internet of Things to rule them all? | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Hoping to be the one-stop-shop for open IoT control, it joins up various new and existing connected devices in a user-friendly and powerful system
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It supports home-network based devices, plugging into your router to control them through fixed or Wi-Fi networks, as well as two of the most broadly used wireless home-automation standards, ZigBee and Z-Wave. It means that the Hub can talk to almost every product currently available on the market that doesn’t use an isolated proprietary system.  Not all products support the Hub, however, even if they can talk to it. But SmartThings has something many other devices vying for a similar spot in people’s homes doesn’t have – a viable, productive home hacker and developer community.  The result is that even if a product doesn’t officially support Samsung’s open system, such as Google’s Nest smart thermostat for instance, someone will probably have developed a workaround. Those workarounds are often relatively complex to put into practice, but tutorials are available and there are enough support tools to guide most people with a moderate understanding of computers and basic code to make it work.   The Hub is only half the story. You interact with and control your Hub and connected devices through the SmartThings app. It’s available for Android, iOS and Windows Phone, but you will need one of those devices to make it work.

The Android app is relatively intuitive. You add supported devices or “Things” to the app using an automatic discovery system. The Hub scans for stuff it can connect to and allows you to select which ones you want to set up. A couple of taps and that’s all that’s required for most devices.  You can then group devices into rooms, such as the lounge or kitchen, and assign tasks and events to them. An event can be triggered by almost anything, from other devices to your presence or the time of day. There’s a step-by-step guide that walks you through the process and some pre-formed ideas of what might be useful.  More advanced configurations can create an alarm system, using sensors, cameras and other bits. For instance, you can “arm” your house so that the lights come on, the camera starts recording and it sends you alerts to your smartphone if the locked door is opened. - This product may have legs with a couple more iterations for the emerging IoT home space,but the programming aspect may still act as a deterrent for all but the most tech savvy.

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Yahoo to cut 15 percent jobs, close several units: WSJ

Yahoo to cut 15 percent jobs, close several units: WSJ | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Yahoo Inc (YHOO.O) Chief Executive Marissa Mayer is set to reveal cost-cutting plans that include slashing 15 percent of its workforce, or roughly 1,600 jobs, and closing several business units, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.
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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is set to reveal cost-cutting plans that include slashing 15% of its workforce, or roughly 1,600 jobs, and closing several business units, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.  The plans are expected to be announced after Yahoo's fourth-quarter results on Tuesday, citing people familiar with the matter. It did not specify which business units might be closed.  

Yahoo had about 11,000 employees as of June 30, according to its website, down from a Dec. 31, 2014 total of about 12,500 full-time employees and what it called fixed term contractors.  Last week Yahoo confirmed plans to close its offices in Argentina and Mexico. The company declined to specify how many jobs were affected, but said the offices were small and "sales-focused." Yahoo has struggled to expand its Internet business, which includes selling search and display ads on its news and sports sites and email service, in the face of competition from Alphabet's Google unit and Facebook. 

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Sony Grabs Israeli Chipmaker Altair for $212M To Boost IoT Biz

Sony Grabs Israeli Chipmaker Altair for $212M To Boost IoT Biz | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

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Sony Corp. ust snapped up Altair Semiconductor for $212 million to get a running start. Israel-based Altair makes modem chip technology and develops software for LTE, the standard data Relevant Products/Services communications protocol on most smartphones. Industry watchers expect LTE to be the connector of devices in the rising IoT market. Sony expects to complete the acquisition early next month.  “Going forward, more and more ‘things’ are expected to be equipped with cellular chipsets, realizing a connected environment in which ‘things’ can reliably and securely access network services that leverage the power of cloud Relevant Products/Services computing,” Sony said in a statement.

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Lenovo And Google Announce Partnership To Develop Project Tango Smartphone

Lenovo And Google Announce Partnership To Develop Project Tango Smartphone | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Lenovo and Google have teamed up to create the first Project Tango-enabled smartphone that is slated for the summer of 2016.
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"To break new ground in today's hypercompetitive smartphone and tablet industries, we must take innovation risks — it's the only way to truly change the way people use mobile technology," Chen Xudong, senior vice president and president of Lenovo, said in a press release on Jan. 7. "Together with Google we're breaking down silos by working across mobile hardware and software. Turning our shared vision into reality will create a more holistic product experience that captures the imagination of today's consumer."  Project Tango is the technology platform developed by Google that uses computer vision, depth sensing and motion tracking to create on-screen 3D experiences. A sensor in the Project Tango device captures 3D dimensions of the room, and uses motion sensing technology to react to the user's movements, such as when they move forward and backward.  The first consumer mobile device to feature Google's Project Tango is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, and offers users the ability to turn the screen into a window that overlays digital information and objects onto the real world.

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Amazon’s now selling its own brand of ARM processors for the connected home

Amazon’s now selling its own brand of ARM processors for the connected home | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Amazon has officially entered the semiconductor market with the news that it is selling its own-brand of ARM-based chips to manufacturers.
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Amazon has officially entered the semiconductor market with the news that it is selling its own-brand of ARM-based chips to manufacturers.  U.S. tech companies went transatlantic on more than a few occasions last year in their search for innovation, but one of the more curious cases was when Amazon headed to Israel and snapped up Annapurna Labs for a reported $350 million. The chip-design startup was founded in 2011, though it had largely operated in stealth mode in the years since. It was known that Annapurna Labs was working on ARM-based “midrange networking chips for data centers that transmit more data and use less power,”  It was also mooted at the time that Amazon planned to move away from Intel’s chips to the lower power-consumption of ARM. And making its own chips would ultimately lead to significant savings over the long term.

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How the Internet of Things Limits Consumer Choice

How the Internet of Things Limits Consumer Choice | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
A recent dustup over smart light bulbs illuminates a larger problem.
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As the Internet of Things becomes more prevalent, so too will this kind of anti-competitive behavior (Specifically, the DMCA includes an anti-circumvention provision, which prohibits companies from circumventing “technological protection measures” that “effectively control access” to copyrighted works. That means it’s illegal for someone to create a Hue-compatible lightbulb without Philips’ permission, a K-cup-compatible coffee pod without Keurigs’, or an HP-printer compatible cartridge without HP’s.  By now, we're used to this in the computer world. In the 1990s, Microsoft used a strategy it called “embrace, extend, extinguish,” in which it gradually added proprietary capabilities to products that already adhered to widely used standards. Some more recent examples: Amazon's e-book format doesn't work on other companies' readers, music purchased from Apple's iTunes store doesn't work with other music players, and every game console has its own proprietary game cartridge format.)  which undercuts the purpose of having smart objects in the first place. We'll want our light bulbs to communicate with a central controller, regardless of manufacturer. We'll want our clothes to communicate with our dishwasher and our cars to communicate with traffic signs.

We can’t have this when companies can cut off compatible products, or use the law to prevent competitors from reverse-engineering their products to ensure compatibility across brands. For the Internet of Things to provide any value, what we need is a world that looks like the automotive industry, where you can go to a store and buy replacement parts made by a wide variety of different manufacturers. Instead, the Internet of Things is on track to become a battleground of competing standards, as companies try to build monopolies by locking each other out.

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Cloud storage provider Box's revenue jumps 38%

Cloud storage provider Box's revenue jumps 38% | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Cloud storage provider Box Inc reported a 38 percent rise in quarterly revenue as more userssigned up for its services.

Via massimo facchinetti
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Cloud storage provider Box Inc reported a 38%  rise in quarterly revenue as more users signed up for its services.  The company's revenue rose to $78.7 million in the third quarter ended Oct. 31, from $57 million a year earlier.

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