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Change or Die

Change or Die | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

All leadership comes down to this: changing people's behavior. Why is that so hard? Science offers some surprising new answers...


Via Matthew Delmarter
Richard Platt's insight:

I once had one of my senior manager clients complain about the statement of "innovate or die" - the necessity of adapting because the firm's future is dependent on doing so.  Clearly he was resisting the idea of being able to make the necessary changes.  The only thing we would add is that change personally or at an organizational level is tough stuff to master, and most companies who attempt it fail miserably - we strongly suggest getting a change agent who's done it before to help you.    Please see our fellow curators comments below:


Matthew Delmarter's insight:

What if you were given this choice? How would you react?


This article offers some interesting comments on the science of behavioural change. Even when somebody's life is on the line, the numbers show that most of us will not change our habits.


So how to enforce change in somebody's behaviour? Or more importantly, change our own behaviour?


Here are some take-home comments I zoomed in on...


  • Instead of trying to motivate with the "fear of dying", inspire a new vision of the "joy of living" - convincing them they can feel better, not just live longer. That means enjoying the things that make daily life pleasurable, like making love or even taking long walks without the pain caused by their disease. "Joy is a more powerful motivator than fear".
      
  • Radical, sweeping, comprehensive changes are often easier for people than small, incremental ones.
      
  • Don't go it alone. Accept help and support - in fact, look for it. "If you look at people after coronary-artery bypass grafting two years later, 90% of them have not changed their lifestyle" - conversely when buttressed with weekly support groups with other patients, as well as attention from dieticians, psychologists, nurses, and instructors, over 77% of one group of patients did successfully change their lifestyle.
      
  • The cumulative weight of experience makes it harder to change.
      
  • People think they're leading an interesting life when they haven't learned anything in 20 or 30 years. What happens if you don't work at mental rejuvenation? People who live to 85 have a 50-50 chance of being senile. While the issue for heart patients is "change or die," the issue for everyone is "change or lose your mind."  


---


You can read the full article here:
http://www.fastcompany.com/52717/change-or-die

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Matthew Delmarter's curator insight, December 18, 2013 3:53 PM

What if you were given this choice? How would you react?


This article offers some interesting comments on the science of behavioural change. Even when somebody's life is on the line, the numbers show that most of us will not change our habits.


So how to enforce change in somebody's behaviour? Or more importantly, change our own behaviour?


Here are some take-home comments I zoomed in on...


  • Instead of trying to motivate with the "fear of dying", inspire a new vision of the "joy of living" - convincing them they can feel better, not just live longer. That means enjoying the things that make daily life pleasurable, like making love or even taking long walks without the pain caused by their disease. "Joy is a more powerful motivator than fear".
      
  • Radical, sweeping, comprehensive changes are often easier for people than small, incremental ones.
      
  • Don't go it alone. Accept help and support - in fact, look for it. "If you look at people after coronary-artery bypass grafting two years later, 90% of them have not changed their lifestyle" - conversely when buttressed with weekly support groups with other patients, as well as attention from dieticians, psychologists, nurses, and instructors, over 77% of one group of patients did successfully change their lifestyle.
      
  • The cumulative weight of experience makes it harder to change.
      
  • People think they're leading an interesting life when they haven't learned anything in 20 or 30 years. What happens if you don't work at mental rejuvenation? People who live to 85 have a 50-50 chance of being senile. While the issue for heart patients is "change or die," the issue for everyone is "change or lose your mind."  


---


You can read the full article here:
http://www.fastcompany.com/52717/change-or-die

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The Corporate Innovator - Samsung

How Samsung does innovation systematically and systemically, repeatably and reliably.
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How Samsung does innovation systematically, systemically, repeatably and reliably

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Google's IoT Eddystone 'Beacons', More Open Than Apple's

Google's IoT Eddystone 'Beacons', More Open Than Apple's | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Google has added another set of nuts and bolts to the mechanics of the Internet of Things (IoT) with the launch of its Eddystone technology. Named after the Eddystone Lighthouse off of the English coast in the county of Cornwall, Google’s Eddystone is an open source cross-platform Bluetooth LE (BLE) [...]
Richard Platt's insight:

Google has added another set of nuts and bolts to the mechanics of the Internet of Things (IoT) with the launch of its Eddystone technology. Named after the Eddystone Lighthouse off of the English coast in the county of Cornwall, Google’s Eddystone is an open source cross-platform Bluetooth LE (BLE) beacon format. Apple’s iBeacon technology for iPhones and other iOS devices, which sits in the same BLE space technically, is a comparatively closed platform.   -  When users get to connect with IoT beacon technology they can get what the industry likes to call ‘better proximity contextual experiences’. The Eddystone specification itself includes a number of ‘broadcast frame’ types (or data payloads, if you prefer) including Eddystone-URL, which the firm says is the backbone of the Physical Web.


How IoT beacons work:  Beacon transmitters like those ascribing to the Eddystone format broadcast one-way information via Bluetooth to smartphones or tablets (it’s not usually going to be a laptop) typically while users are mobile on foot.  “Beacons can be deployed at fixed places such as airports, museums, and bus stops, and also to movable objects such as bicycles and taxis,” says Google.  -  The data may be ‘absorbed’ by the user’s device via direct user-initiated connection or by more passive ‘always on’ connection if the user’s device is set up to establish a more constant relationship. Stores and shops could use beacons to send out promotions, special event locations could send out directions and warnings, travel locations could send out transport news, timetables or alerts and so on. Basically, it’s the way you imagine the truly connected Internet of Things world to work when it all does.


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IBM Launches New IoT Community for Developers

IBM Launches New IoT Community for Developers | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
IBM today announced the launch of a new community, IBM developerWorks Recipes, designed to help developers – from novice to experienced – quickly and easily learn how to connect Internet of Things (IoT) devices to the cloud and how to use data coming from those connected devices. Users of developerWorks Recipes can tap into IBM’s ...

Via M2M World News
Richard Platt's insight:

Users of developerWorks Recipes can tap into IBM’s platform-as-a-service, Bluemix, to implement step-by-step tutorials for embedding advanced analytics and machine learning into IoT devices and applications. Examples include:

  • Understanding vehicle performance by analyzing data from its On-Board Diagnostic system.
  • Linking real-time machine condition monitoring with IBM asset management to monitor everything from the health of household appliances to wheels on a railroad car.
  • Spotting trends and obtaining solutions to common problems through graphical representation of historical and real-time data from IoT devices.
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Servers.com Brings Its Bare-Metal Servers To The US

Servers.com Brings Its Bare-Metal Servers To The US | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Servers.com, a hosting company with a focus on dedicated bare-metal servers that launched in Europe in 2005, today announced the opening of its first U.S...
Richard Platt's insight:

Until now, Servers.com was mostly focused on its Amsterdam location. But as the company’s COO Nick Dvas told me, he believes that while the U.S. is very different from Servers.com’s home market, “with a way tougher competition,” it’s also “way more rewarding in terms of market size.”  He also believes that there is still lots of room for a dedicated server business in the U.S. That’s partly driven by the current move to containers, he said. “Containers are particularly important because they are easy to use, close to the hardware and have less overhead,” he said. “So they allow you to get all of the benefits of a bare metal server.”  In addition to containers, though, he also sees demand for standing up private VMware and OpenStack clouds on the service. One thing Dvas argues makes his service stand out is that it offers private 40 GBPS networking between servers, which can potentially speed up your overall cluster when you need to send a lot of data back and forth between machines. In addition, the company also offers 20 GBPS private networking between its European and U.S. data centers.

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Amazon wants dedicated airspace for delivery drones

Amazon wants dedicated airspace for delivery drones | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
It’s no secret that Amazon is seriously considering using drones to deliver packages across short distances, and now the company has taken a clearer step towards reaching the goal. The…
Richard Platt's insight:

The Amazon proposal suggests high-speed drones be limited to an area covering a height of 200 to 400 feet off the ground. Another 100-foot area above this corridor would be designated as a no-fly zone to act as a buffer against other aircraft.  The company unveiled the plans at the NASA UTM Convention in California, and included five features for drones that would be able to fly in the zone:

  • An advanced GPS system to pinpoint their location in real-time along with any nearby drones
  • Reliable internet to maintain communications with GPS data and other devices
  • Online flight planning to predict and communicate flight paths
  • The ability to communicate with other drones to ensure they avoid each other
  • Sensors to avoid obstacles including birds, buildings and cables
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When Will Intel Corporation Launch Its First 10-Nanometer Atom Processor?

When Will Intel Corporation Launch Its First 10-Nanometer Atom Processor? | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
It's looking like early 2018 right now.
Richard Platt's insight:

By and large I am not a big fan of the Motley Fool, (a lot of the advice that doesn't match what is actually going on inside of companies), however Ashraf Eassa is one that I do pay attention to- he does good analysis.  Here's what had to say about Intel (one of his favorite company's to analyze) - my comments in parentheses and bold italics:


"In order for Intel to be able to capture share in the smartphone market, I believe that the company needs to show potential customers that it can consistently churn out products with leadership performance, power consumption, and feature integration in a timely fashion. (Which I agree with,  and I am sure that Intel does as well)

One of the key drivers of product competitiveness is the manufacturing technology upon which its chips are built. Although there is far more to the competitiveness of a semiconductor chip than the underlying manufacturing technology, there's no denying that all else equal, better manufacturing technology means faster, more efficient processors. (All of this is true)


He has some interesting analysis (read the article for that) about Intel and what it must do to get to the 10nm node, and I would add that time is not on Intel's side when compared against Samsung and TSMC, and you can come to your own conclusion.   


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IoT changes OEM electronics outsourcing strategy - What the EMS firms are Doing

IoT changes OEM electronics outsourcing strategy - What the EMS firms are Doing | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The IoT changes how electronics OEMs identify electronics services providers with adequate capabilities and understanding of extract, transform and loading of
Richard Platt's insight:
Advances in embedded computing on faster, smaller platforms offering greater functionality combined with systems connectivity supported by data identification, aggregation and mining is what’s driving the IoT marketplace today.  EMS companies are competing for the business from OEM's, some seem to understand better than others what that will take to be an effective provider in that field.
  • Jabil best positioned itself early on (online and off) to address what the IoT can and will offer electronics OEM seeking more innovative ways to do more with their products and services.
  • Foxconn has done next to zero with online marketing its IoT capabilities but the world’s largest electronics manufacturing services (EMS) provider publicly committed finances in IoT to technical capabilities provided by a French Internet of Things and cloud solutions provider.
  • Recently EMS provider Flextronics re-designed its Website. Far above anything seen so far. Flex(tronics) has quickly distanced itself from all other providers currently positioned for offering IoT service capabilities.  Flex’s marketers have done a terrific job branding and effectively communicating to OEM prospects the provider understands the evolving IoT horizon. With a gaggle of newly-crowned Flex embedded systems developers, whether Flex can execute remains to be seen.
Regardless of savvy marketing, and remove any genuine desires to execute, having access to enough available cash to staff and build IoT service capabilities in-house with deep ETL expertise to extract, transform and load proprietary methodologies to meet IoT and machine learning head on creates a whole different set of challenges.
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Nokia's $16.6B acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent approved by European Commission

The European Commission has given the green light to Nokia's acquisition of telecoms equipment company Alcatel-Lucent for €15.6 billion ($16.6 billion). The Commission noted that the deal would...
Richard Platt's insight:

The newly approved deal is the latest milestone in Nokia's transition from a company with major interests in consumer markets to an operation focused primarily on business and industry clients. Nokia's failure to keep up with the mobile market is well known, with the acquisition of its handset business by Microsoft recently written off for $7.6 billion (although Nokia has made a few attempts to perpetuate its brand). The company is also thought to be selling its Here Maps businesses to a consortium of automakers including Audi, BMW, and Mercedes. While a mobile company might have found a good use for an integrated maps business, the new Nokia’s interests evidently lie elsewhere.

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​IoT is a good investment, claims a TCS study

​IoT is a good investment, claims a TCS study | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The average increase in revenue as a result of investments in IoT is 15.6%, said the biggest software exporter in the country, quoting a study conducted among 795 executives working at large multinationals
Richard Platt's insight:

The report, which looks at trends across 13 key industries, found that large-scale investment in IoT infrastructure and monitoring where executives in the Industrial Manufacturing sector are reporting the largest increase in revenue from IoT, with an average 28.5 %, followed by Financial Services (17.7 %) and Media & Entertainment (17.4 %). The Automotive industry has the lowest revenue gain with just a 9.9 % increase.  The Travel, Transportation and Hospitality sectors planning to spend 0.6 % of revenue this year. Media and Entertainment companies will spend 0.57 % of their revenue on IoT in this year - significantly more than the 0.4 % average and the 0.44 percent spend in Banking and Financial Services.

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MSFT's Xbox One video game console is your next work computer

MSFT's Xbox One video game console is your next work computer | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
With Windows 10 and Xbox One, anything is possible, including the possibility that the game console could become Microsoft's flagship desktop computer and...
Richard Platt's insight:

The Xbox One, the successor to the Xbox 360, is increasingly well-positioned to do everything — games, entertainment, productivity. And at a current $350 MSRP (with a copy of Halo: The Master Chief Collection, to boot), the Xbox One may well be your next computer.

The first data point here is Microsoft's longstanding commitment to putting a full-blown version of the forthcoming Windows 10 operating system on the Xbox One console, though it's being coy about the timing.  -  This is important, because a major selling point for Windows 10 is "universal apps." This is the idea that any Windows 10 app will work on any Windows 10 device — phone, tablet, computer, futuristic HoloLens or, once it gets the update, the Xbox One. It also means there's nothing stopping you from running, say, the Windows 10 versions of Microsoft Office on a Windows 10-updated Xbox One.

While the Xbox controller is great for playing games, and works well enough as a remote control when watching movies, it's not exactly a rich input device for writing term papers.  -  But that will change. Xbox boss Phil Spencer said on Twitter yesterday that Microsoft is working on mouse and keyboard support for the Xbox One.  - Ever since I had my own XBox, I always wondered why MSFT never went full on to make it a multi-functional platform, like it's PC predecessor.  I strongly see this as a potential direction of the evolvement of the PC for the Home, and one that incorporates and manages the other wireless Home IoT devices.  Perhaps you see it differently, what do you think?

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ARM is enhanced by race to build the IoT

ARM is enhanced by race to build the IoT | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Arm Holdings has benefited from the increasing focus on the internet of things, with sales and profits increasing in the first half of 2015 as it looked to diversify from its traditional strength in smartphones. The Cambridge-based group signed a
Richard Platt's insight:

ARM, signed a record 54 processor licences in the Q2 of this year, with its chips set to be used in products ranging from biometric sensors for mobile payments to automotive engine controls.. Its components are used in more than 95% of smartphones, with the rise of mobile devices powering its growth in recent years.   ARM reported that revenues in Q2 were up 15% y-o-y to $351M, slightly higher than analysts’ expectations. However, the company also reported that revenues from licensing, which represents 42% of total sales, had increased just 3% to $151M — a disappointment for a company that had recently seen double-digit growth in that area.


But their growth occurred as a result of what it did last year, ARM refreshed its range of chips for smartphones and is banking on continued strong growth in this sector, predicting that half of all new smartphones sold this year will contain its latest chips.  And has been boosted by record sales of Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.  Over the past year, ARM has also benefited from consumers upgrading from 3G mobiles to 4G devices. These contain ARM-designed components that allow the group to make more money per device.

The company has also become a key supplier to most large electronics manufacturers while pursuing other areas for growth, such as cars and servers


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Google to tackle patent trolls with free patents for start-ups

Google to tackle patent trolls with free patents for start-ups | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Tech giant Google has long led a tirade against patent trolls, and now it’s escalating the war by giving eligible start-ups two free patents.
Richard Platt's insight:

Tech giant Google has long led a tirade against patent trolls, and now it’s escalating the war by giving eligible start-ups two free patents.  -  A patent troll is a person or company that attempts to enforce patent rights against accused infringers, when they either do not manufacture a product or supply a service related to that patent.  The term generally refers to people or companies who are purely in the business of litigation, or threatening litigation, as opposed to making or selling something.  -  Google said today it will give start-ups two patents for free, which they can keep, as long as they join the LOT network, a cross-company effort including firms like Dropbox, SAP and Canon, to fight patent trolls.  -  As first reported by TechCrunch Google has opened the program only to the first 50 eligible start-ups, while eligibility requirements include that a company’s 2014 revenue has to be between $US500,000 and $US20 million.  -  Once the company has applied Google will then send it a list of three to five families of patents, of which they can select two.  -  The patents can only be used defensively to protect against a lawsuit, and Google retains a license to the patents it gives away.  -  Each of the start-ups also join the LOT program. Google said under its LOT program every company that participates grants a license to the other participants where the license becomes effective only when patents are transferred to non-participants.  Google will also waive LOT membership fees for the first two years of a start-up’s participation.

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NVIDIA Shield update enables Android 5.1 and Google Cast

NVIDIA Shield update enables Android 5.1 and Google Cast | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The Original NVIDIA Shield handheld is finally getting an Android 5.1 upgrade -- but it comes at a price.
Richard Platt's insight:

A new, optional update for the Shield bestows the handheld with latest version of Lollipop, the ability to be a Chromecast / Google Cast source device and fixes a glitch that made Google Play Books unusable -- but in trade, it takes away Miracast support and permanently removes a handful of apps, and you lose Sonic 4: Episode II, Expendable: Rearmed if that was an important game for you, don't get the optional update.

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Gartner Says the IoT Is Creating New Software Vendors who don't Get the Money

Gartner Says the Internet of Things Is Creating New Software Vendors
Richard Platt's insight:

The IoT is turning many manufacturers of "things" into first-time software vendors that need licensing and entitlement management (LEM) solutions, according to Gartner, Inc. By shifting product value from device hardware to the software running on the device and applying an appropriate licensing strategy, manufacturing product strategists can maximize revenue potential. 


"The IoT is creating a new type of software vendor for whom LEM is vital to protect, differentiate and monetize their offerings," said Laurie Wurster, research director at Gartner. "We expect that by 2020, a failure to put in place a LEM system will result in a 20 percent drop in potential revenue generated from software for device manufacturers connecting to the IoT." 

The issue is that many makers of "things" still apply a traditional "box" mentality to products and do not consider the extra revenue opportunities of licensing-controlled embedded software and applications. Most of these companies are first-time software providers, mainly device manufacturers and OEMs that can now monetize their software as well as the devices via the IoT. For these companies, the IoT represents a significant market opportunity. 

"By controlling product functionality and the features and capacities of Internet-connected devices via flexible licensing, device manufacturers will be better able to compete in current and new markets. They will also be able to come to market quicker with new products, new feature combinations and product enhancements," said Ms. Wurster. "Moreover, software-controlled configuration gives manufacturers more flexibility to regionalize their offerings and develop niche solutions for specific markets without having to manufacture separate product stock keeping units (SKUs). Overall, this reduces the number of SKUs produced, lowering overall manufacturing costs while enhancing manufacturers' ability to customize and regionalize products."


Gartner research indicates that the vast majority of device manufacturers do not have, or have yet to implement, commercial LEM systems to monetize the IoT. This is because, historically, they had little or no software IP to protect. Initially, they will look to build LEM capabilities in-house as they already have a technical and engineering background that developed the hardware, and they often believe that these internal resources can also build an efficient LEM system.  "For some, recognizing the need for a LEM solution is a viable first step.

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How Markets and Vendors Are Evaluated in Gartner Magic Quadrants

How Markets and Vendors Are Evaluated in Gartner Magic Quadrants | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Magic Quadrants offer visual snapshots, in-depth analyses and actionable advice that provide insight into a market's direction, maturity and participants. Understanding our methodology will help you when evaluating a market, choosing a technology or service provider or managing vendor relationships.

Via Bonnie Hohhof, Marc Wachtfogel, PhD, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Richard Platt's insight:

A lot of companies could benefit by truly understanding what this quadrant tool is telling them, namely if you can't execute (As Measured By: Financial Results and Product Outcomes), and then go change their organizations to actually achieve what they want and not let the status quo old school mentality prevail and prevent the decline of a firm's performance.  It is as Einstein has often been quoted as saying "what got you to where you are at, will not be what you will need to do to get where you really want to go."

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Rog Rothe's curator insight, Today, 12:35 AM

I scooped this because it is an interesting take on organizational leadership.  I hope that someday I will learn how to best navigate all of the quadrants of leadership to maximize learning results and be an effective leader. 

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Intel And Micron Announce Breakthrough Faster-Than-Flash 3D XPoint Storage Technology

Intel And Micron Announce Breakthrough Faster-Than-Flash 3D XPoint Storage Technology | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
A new class of memory storage was announced today by Intel and Micron. It marks a rare introduction of a new class of memory and each one has had large, wide-ranging impacts on the technology industry. 3D XPoint technology claims to be 1,000 times faster, has 1,000 times greater durability and [...]
Richard Platt's insight:

The technology is a fundamental breakthrough in the memory storage industry, offering massive benefits over current NAND-based storage, which is used in devices such as solid state disks (SSDs) and smartphones. For example, current SSDs that are based on NAND memory have limited write cycles, with a portion of the storage space being used essentially as a backup when memory cells die. A 1,000-fold increase in memory durability could have a profound impact on a range of devices, as well as hard disk sales.  There are breakthrough materials used in 3D XPoint too that allow for greater density and performance. Memory is stored in a fundamentally different way. Property changes – not phase-changes, in the storage material itself are used – completely different to alternative electron-based storage. The technology uses a binary change in the resistance of the material, moving from high to low resistance.  The memory is able to be written at the bit-level, meaning that in certain circumstances, traditional garbage collection on SSDs won’t be needed and there are no transistors used in the storage of the individual memory cells.

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Chris Johnson's curator insight, Today, 11:38 AM
I wonder if this means that we will have TB options for USB drives!
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GE FirstBuild Launches Indiegogo Campaign For Next Generation Icemaker

GE FirstBuild Launches Indiegogo Campaign For Next Generation Icemaker | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
It’s the biggest innovation in ice in nearly twenty-five years, according to General Electric (a company that knows a thing or two about ice). It’s called..
Richard Platt's insight:

OK so I pay attention to a lot of different corporate open innovation platforms efforts, like the one GE is doing here on Indiegogo.  Here is one of their examples:  Dreamed up by the crowdsourced community GE has harnessed through its FirstBuild initiative, the Opal makes a heretofore inaccessible ice cube available to John Q Public (unless they were a Wonder Twin).   The ice nugget (Opal’s only output), has been available for commercial consumption at roadside Dairy Queens, Sonics, and other fast food chains for years, but the machinery responsible for such frosty, chilly nuggets of icy goodness was too expensive for a home.  -  For those that are interested, there’s also a quick run-through of the magic of making a new ice maker.

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Australian firm BAI and Sensus put utilities on the IoT

Australian firm BAI and Sensus put utilities on the IoT | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Australian communications firm BAI has partnered with US smart meter company Sensus to propel local utilities into the internet-of-things age.
Richard Platt's insight:

Sensus and BAI will design, supply and install digital infrastructure that will allow utilities to remotely and continuously monitor their networks for problems and pre-emptively manage maintenance issues.  -  Data from sensors built into Sensus’s meters is transmitted over radio connections to help utilities better manage their resources.  “The Sensus-BAI partnership can help water utilities (meet) the growing demand by supporting data that helps conserve resources,” Sensus Australia’s director of smart metering Mary Wilson told The Australian.  BAI and Sensus have made bids with utilities across Australia, and expect a decision within months. BAI’s other contracts include running the NSW government radio network, and the New York subway 2G, 3G, 4G and WiFi emergency communications system.  - BAI director of critical communications Malcolm Keys said while Victoria had already mandated the use of smart sensors, utilities elsewhere were now taking the plunge without a legislative push.

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Forget the Ashley Madison or Sony hacks – a crippling cyberattack is imminent in the US

Forget the Ashley Madison or Sony hacks – a crippling cyberattack is imminent in the US | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Instead of mobilising a national defence against cyberattacks, we want a toaster that communicates with the washing machine over the internet
Richard Platt's insight:

Grim take on the threat of massive cyberattacks by 2020 that the tech community analysts see it coming.  (I always enjoy talking to or reading about what other specialists in the high tech community think of issues that I see too.)  And I don't think this is unnecessary fear mongering either.  Here's a taste of the article, well worth the read.  


 "I found myself at a dinner in a fancy hotel to discuss cybersecurity with the executives of top Silicon Valley firms. Unlike the festive Target event, the mood was decidedly grim. Actually it was downright alarming.   Forget about the Sony and Ashley Madison hacks. Those cyberthefts may cost companies some money and embarrassment, but that’s not what the execs were nervous about. Even the successful breach of Chrysler’s in-car systems, which allowed hackers to take control of a Jeep on the highway and prompted the recall of 1.4 million vehicles, is a mere appetiser compared with what’s coming down the road.  By 2020 the US will be hit with an earthquake of a cyber-attack that will cripple banks, stock exchanges, power plants and communications, an executive from HP predicted. Companies are nowhere near prepared for it. Neither are the Feds. And yet, instead of mobilising a national defence, we want a toaster that communicates with the washing machine over the internet.


What struck me about the dinner, attended by executives from Hewlett-Packard, software company Cloudera and PayPal, along with academics and investors, was the naked pessimism in the room. Nobody even tried to put a happy face on the situation. “A slow-moving train wreck,” one executive said. Forget about coordinating with each other or the Feds: companies don’t even know how to deal with their own hacks, never mind worry about someone else’s. A whopping 57% of chief executives have not been trained on what to do after a data breach, according to a report by HP. And more than 70% of executives think their companies only partially understand the risks. Buying antivirus software is one thing; deploying an effective strategy is quite another. However, companies don’t even want to admit they were hacked in the first place.


Check out the article for more

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Honda steers toward Silicon Valley with new R&D center

Honda steers toward Silicon Valley with new R&D center | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Honda gave an unusual nod to Silicon Valley this week, revealing its latest Accord model in the company’s Mountain View research center instead of at a traditional Detroit auto industry show. The automaker opened a small tech research office in Silicon Valley in 2000, and began talking to Apple and Google years ago about improving technology inside cars, before either tech giant was publicly pursuing auto platforms. Honda, one of nine automakers with research and development centers in the val
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Honda, one of nine automakers with R&D centers in the valley, employs nearly 100 workers in Mountain View, many working with local app developers and other innovators. On Thursday it hosted a grand opening for its newest center on Ravendale Drive.  During a press tour, Honda showed off technology that is not yet ready for public consumption — like the Uni-Cub, a self-balancing, one-person, one-wheeled chair that can move as fast as 10 mph. It also demonstrated a system connected to mobile devices that would give the driver an audio and visual warning if an unsuspecting pedestrian is about to cross the path of the vehicle.  Frank Paluch, president of U.S. research and development, said one of the center’s major goals is to cut collisions involving Hondas in half by 2030 and “completely eliminate” them by 2050.

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BlackBerry Extends Corporate Security Focus to the IoT

BlackBerry Extends Corporate Security Focus to the IoT | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Executives at a security summit Thursday focused on the growing number of sensors and physical devices that connect to an enterprise, from medical devices to fire alarms.
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BlackBerry CEO John Chen said the company’s four acquisitions since September put it on track to create “the most secure mobile platform that the industry has to offer.” The deals are part of a turnaround based on enterprise security software and services as well as smartphones aimed at professionals.  Executives at Blackberry are now focused on the growing number of sensors and physical devices that connect to an enterprise, from medical devices to fire alarms.

To highlight the vulnerabilities of these devices, the company demonstrated how hackers could take over an infusion pump, a device used to distribute fluids to a patient. Alongside Chief Security Officer David Kleidermacher, a BlackBerry security researcher broke into the pump via his laptop and changed the speed of a morphine drip.  CIOs now are approaching the BlackBerry about securing not just mobile devices, but also the sensors and other equipment in the enterprise that connects to the Internet, said Jeff Holleran, BlackBerry’s VP of corporate strategy. The company now is looking at how to connect fire alarms and other devices to corporate networks via BlackBerry’s security platform.


With its most recent purchase – software provider AtHoc on Wednesday – BlackBerry signaled its desire to improve communications between organizations and the devices floating among them. The software works across mobile operating systems to allow users to communicate in real time during a cyberattack or other type of crisis situation, the Journal’s Ben Dummett reported. Its platform also connects to devices like sirens and fire panels. A sensor in the panel could trigger an alarm, then alert users via their phones. The company’s services are used by most branches of the US military.

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Qualcomm trims about 4,500 jobs and $1.4 billion from books

Qualcomm trims about 4,500 jobs and $1.4 billion from books | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
In an attempt to cut roughly $1.4 billion in costs, San Diego-based Qualcomm is trimming 15 percent of its total workforce, or around 4,500 jobs. The announcement came as the company…
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In an attempt to cut roughly $1.4 billion in costs, San Diego-based Qualcomm is trimming 15 percent of its total workforce, or around 4,500 jobs. The announcement came as the company announced its quarterly earnings, which beat analysts’ expectations.  Qualcomm reported earnings of $0.99/share on the back of $5.83 Billion in revenue, but overall earnings fell just shy of expectations ($5.55 billion).  Qualcomm also says it plans to introduce a new cost-cutting plan that it hopes will reduce expenditures by roughly $1.1 billion in addition to cutting jobs.  - Tough times ahead if you work at Qualcomm

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Wal-Mart buys out China e-commerce firm Yihaodian in online push

Wal-Mart buys out China e-commerce firm Yihaodian in online push | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Wal-Mart Stores Inc has taken full ownership of Chinese e-commerce firm Yihaodian.com, buying out the 49 percent stake that it did not already own to accelerate its push online, the U.S. retail giant
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Huge move by Wal-Mart to join the truly digital world, and thwart it's main rival Amazon (we see this as a flank move on Wal-Mart's part).  -  Wal-Mart has taken full ownership of Chinese e-commerce firm Yihaodian.com, buying out the 49% stake that it did not already own to accelerate its push online.   The investment will help Wal-Mart target China's fast-growing online market at a time when largely brick and mortar retailers are feeling the pinch of competition from online rivals and a slowing of the world's second-largest economy.  Wal-Mart's move also comes after China said last month it will allow full foreign ownership of some e-commerce businesses, with the goal of encouraging foreign investment and the development and competitiveness of the sector.

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Amazon Shares Soar on Quarterly Earnings

Amazon Shares Soar on Quarterly Earnings | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Shares of Amazon.com were soaring nearly 20 percent in after-hours trading as the online giant surprisingly reversed a year-ago loss of $126 million by posting a $92 million profit in the second quarter, then offered strong current-quarter guidance.
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Shares of Amazon.com were soaring nearly 20% in after-hours trading as the online giant surprisingly reversed a year-ago loss of $126 million by posting a $92 million profit in the second quarter, then offered strong current-quarter guidance.  -  Among the highlights in the quarter, Amazon Studios launched six new pilots for kids and debuted a second season of Annedroids on the company's Prime Instant Video service.  The company also said its Amazon Fire TV has grown to 2,000 channels, apps and games, including the additions of Starz Play, Candy Crush Saga and Popcornflix during the quarter. Amazon Fire TV is a box that connects to HDTVs giving users access to Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, HBO GO and more.

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The cloud is too hard, so Intel launched a sweeping project to fix it

The cloud is too hard, so Intel launched a sweeping project to fix it | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The first step is a project with Rackspace to make OpenStack easier to deploy and manage
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Intel has kicked off a broad effort to speed the adoption of the modern cloud infrastructure, which it says has been slow to take off because the software is complex and takes too long to deploy.  To speed its growth, Intel has kicked off a multi-pronged effort, called the Cloud for All initiative, that includes hiring hundreds of additional engineers to work on open-source cloud software, setting up two massive compute clusters where companies can test and validate applications, and making further investments and acquisitions itself.

Its first move is a partnership with Rackspace to make the popular OpenStack cloud platform enterprise-ready and easier to use. Intel and Rackspace will hire hundreds of engineers at a development center near San Antonio, Texas, to work on OpenStack components such as its scheduling software, network capabilities and container services.  The goal is not to create “yet another OpenStack distribution,” but to improve “the overall health of the project.” The companies will also make OpenStack easier to scale.  -  “Today at best, the most successful OpenStack deployments scale to a few hundred nodes. Intel's goal is to enable enterprise class features at scale for thousands of nodes,”

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100 petabytes: How Google’s huge freebie promotes its Nearline cloud backup service

100 petabytes: How Google’s huge freebie promotes its Nearline cloud backup service | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Google, with its sights fixed firmly on Amazon, is using this freebie--and the promise of faster service--to lure corporate customers.
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Google taking on Amazon:  Nearline is nothing like Google’s Drive service, which gives individual users up to 15GB of free cloud storage, and business employees up to 30GB. Like Amazon and other competitors, Nearline offers data-heavy enterprises premium archiving and backup services. Google's Nearline also promises fast retrieval of data, which can take hours or days on competing services.  -  Originally introduced to much fanfare in March, Cloud Storage Nearline now promises 99 percent uptime, on-demand I/O, lifecycle management and a broadly expanded partner ecosystem. The 100 free petabytes of storage—equivalent to 100 million gigabytes—is being offered for new users for up to six months, and aims to lure away companies currently using other providers.

Google’s standard pricing is one cent per GB per month, so the credit is essentially worth $1 million for each month it lasts.

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