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AMD Will Run Android and Windows on the Same PC, Too

AMD Will Run Android and Windows on the Same PC, Too | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Yesterday, Intel announced its plans to run Android and Windows on the same PC in perfect harmony. Now, it seems AMD has the exact same plan.
Richard Platt's insight:

AMD also doing the "me too" strategy running Android and Windows on the same PC....OK so it's a new minimum bar

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Many CEOs Aren’t Breakthrough Innovators (and That’s OK)

Many CEOs Aren’t Breakthrough Innovators (and That’s OK) | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Chief executives have found other ways to create value.
Richard Platt's insight:

In high-tech and fashion retail, more CEOs have a product development background than in pharma (around 60% in both industries), but we found that breakthrough innovation for public companies in these industries is rare; most happen pre-IPO. Instead, public companies are mostly exploiting and improving upon past breakthroughs, not coming up with new ones. In this context, CEOs with technical backgrounds don’t necessarily achieve higher shareholder returns than those without. But with rapidly changing technologies and consumer preferences, having the right specialist experience can help CEOs keep their companies and their offerings relevant.


SUGGESTIONS:

How Does Your CEO rate as a breakthrough innovator?  

What have they done to actually warrant this usually self promoting and self-aggrandizing statement?  


One cannot manage what one does not measure, and this includes CEO's / Senior VP's who like to say they are about the "innovation thingy", yet don't have the skills, experience or background, that demonstrates that is a fact.


Admitting the truth of yourself, others or a situation is not a sign of being a failure or even failing, it is a sign of strength, humility and respect for yourself and others, and it is a way through to rectifying the issue at hand.


If on the other hand you might need to rethink over-reaching when making such statements, that you're a innovator, or even a breakthrough innovator, or at least hire real honest to goodness Serial Innovators to help the firm to be innovative, - Just saying...

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Yahoo to cut 15 percent jobs, close several units: WSJ

Yahoo to cut 15 percent jobs, close several units: WSJ | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Yahoo Inc (YHOO.O) Chief Executive Marissa Mayer is set to reveal cost-cutting plans that include slashing 15 percent of its workforce, or roughly 1,600 jobs, and closing several business units, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.
Richard Platt's insight:

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is set to reveal cost-cutting plans that include slashing 15% of its workforce, or roughly 1,600 jobs, and closing several business units, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.  The plans are expected to be announced after Yahoo's fourth-quarter results on Tuesday, citing people familiar with the matter. It did not specify which business units might be closed.  

Yahoo had about 11,000 employees as of June 30, according to its website, down from a Dec. 31, 2014 total of about 12,500 full-time employees and what it called fixed term contractors.  Last week Yahoo confirmed plans to close its offices in Argentina and Mexico. The company declined to specify how many jobs were affected, but said the offices were small and "sales-focused." Yahoo has struggled to expand its Internet business, which includes selling search and display ads on its news and sports sites and email service, in the face of competition from Alphabet's Google unit and Facebook. 

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Sony Grabs Israeli Chipmaker Altair for $212M To Boost IoT Biz

Sony Grabs Israeli Chipmaker Altair for $212M To Boost IoT Biz | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

This Spotlight Is Brought to You By:

Richard Platt's insight:

Sony Corp. ust snapped up Altair Semiconductor for $212 million to get a running start. Israel-based Altair makes modem chip technology and develops software for LTE, the standard data Relevant Products/Services communications protocol on most smartphones. Industry watchers expect LTE to be the connector of devices in the rising IoT market. Sony expects to complete the acquisition early next month.  “Going forward, more and more ‘things’ are expected to be equipped with cellular chipsets, realizing a connected environment in which ‘things’ can reliably and securely access network services that leverage the power of cloud Relevant Products/Services computing,” Sony said in a statement.

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Lenovo And Google Announce Partnership To Develop Project Tango Smartphone

Lenovo And Google Announce Partnership To Develop Project Tango Smartphone | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Lenovo and Google have teamed up to create the first Project Tango-enabled smartphone that is slated for the summer of 2016.
Richard Platt's insight:

"To break new ground in today's hypercompetitive smartphone and tablet industries, we must take innovation risks — it's the only way to truly change the way people use mobile technology," Chen Xudong, senior vice president and president of Lenovo, said in a press release on Jan. 7. "Together with Google we're breaking down silos by working across mobile hardware and software. Turning our shared vision into reality will create a more holistic product experience that captures the imagination of today's consumer."  Project Tango is the technology platform developed by Google that uses computer vision, depth sensing and motion tracking to create on-screen 3D experiences. A sensor in the Project Tango device captures 3D dimensions of the room, and uses motion sensing technology to react to the user's movements, such as when they move forward and backward.  The first consumer mobile device to feature Google's Project Tango is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, and offers users the ability to turn the screen into a window that overlays digital information and objects onto the real world.

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Amazon’s now selling its own brand of ARM processors for the connected home

Amazon’s now selling its own brand of ARM processors for the connected home | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Amazon has officially entered the semiconductor market with the news that it is selling its own-brand of ARM-based chips to manufacturers.
Richard Platt's insight:

Amazon has officially entered the semiconductor market with the news that it is selling its own-brand of ARM-based chips to manufacturers.  U.S. tech companies went transatlantic on more than a few occasions last year in their search for innovation, but one of the more curious cases was when Amazon headed to Israel and snapped up Annapurna Labs for a reported $350 million. The chip-design startup was founded in 2011, though it had largely operated in stealth mode in the years since. It was known that Annapurna Labs was working on ARM-based “midrange networking chips for data centers that transmit more data and use less power,”  It was also mooted at the time that Amazon planned to move away from Intel’s chips to the lower power-consumption of ARM. And making its own chips would ultimately lead to significant savings over the long term.

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How the Internet of Things Limits Consumer Choice

How the Internet of Things Limits Consumer Choice | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
A recent dustup over smart light bulbs illuminates a larger problem.
Richard Platt's insight:

As the Internet of Things becomes more prevalent, so too will this kind of anti-competitive behavior (Specifically, the DMCA includes an anti-circumvention provision, which prohibits companies from circumventing “technological protection measures” that “effectively control access” to copyrighted works. That means it’s illegal for someone to create a Hue-compatible lightbulb without Philips’ permission, a K-cup-compatible coffee pod without Keurigs’, or an HP-printer compatible cartridge without HP’s.  By now, we're used to this in the computer world. In the 1990s, Microsoft used a strategy it called “embrace, extend, extinguish,” in which it gradually added proprietary capabilities to products that already adhered to widely used standards. Some more recent examples: Amazon's e-book format doesn't work on other companies' readers, music purchased from Apple's iTunes store doesn't work with other music players, and every game console has its own proprietary game cartridge format.)  which undercuts the purpose of having smart objects in the first place. We'll want our light bulbs to communicate with a central controller, regardless of manufacturer. We'll want our clothes to communicate with our dishwasher and our cars to communicate with traffic signs.

We can’t have this when companies can cut off compatible products, or use the law to prevent competitors from reverse-engineering their products to ensure compatibility across brands. For the Internet of Things to provide any value, what we need is a world that looks like the automotive industry, where you can go to a store and buy replacement parts made by a wide variety of different manufacturers. Instead, the Internet of Things is on track to become a battleground of competing standards, as companies try to build monopolies by locking each other out.

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Cloud storage provider Box's revenue jumps 38%

Cloud storage provider Box's revenue jumps 38% | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Cloud storage provider Box Inc reported a 38 percent rise in quarterly revenue as more userssigned up for its services.

Via massimo facchinetti
Richard Platt's insight:

Cloud storage provider Box Inc reported a 38%  rise in quarterly revenue as more users signed up for its services.  The company's revenue rose to $78.7 million in the third quarter ended Oct. 31, from $57 million a year earlier.

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eBay’s Retail Tech Patent Spree

eBay’s Retail Tech Patent Spree | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Recent patent filings by online retailer, reseller and auction mega-site eBay have pundits guessing at whether the company intends to take its offerings into the brick-and-mortar space in the coming months and years.

Via Kenneth Carnesi
Richard Platt's insight:

Recent patent filings by online retailer, reseller and auction mega-site eBay have pundits guessing at whether the company intends to take its offerings into the brick-and-mortar space in the coming months and years.

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Sony confirms $155M purchase of Toshiba image sensor business

Sony confirms $155M purchase of Toshiba image sensor business | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Following rumors and negotiations over the last few months, Sony has confirmed today that it is buying the image sensor business of fellow Japanese tech giant Toshiba for 19 billion yen, or roughly $155 million.
Richard Platt's insight:

Sony has confirmed today that it is buying the image sensor business of fellow Japanese tech giant Toshiba for roughly $155 million. This comes after Sony's decision in early October to spin off its own sensor division into a separate company, now called Sony Semiconductor Solutions. This, along with the Toshiba purchase, will allow Sony to secure itself as the dominant provider of camera and smartphone sensors.  As was said when negotiations between Sony and Toshiba began, the former will be taking over the latter's sensor production plants, as well as their employees and any equipment, which are located in Oita, Japan. Toshiba's operations will be folded into Sony Semiconductor Solutions, with the deal said to be completed by the end of the current financial year, in March 2016.

The image sensor business is on of Sony's most important assets, as its one of the company's most successful and continually growing divisions. Sony dominated last year's image sensor market, seeing it responsible for 40% of production, along with every new iPhone 6 and Samsung Galaxy S6 shipping with two of Sony's sensors inside.

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BlackBerry to leave Pakistan after refusing to ditch user privacy

BlackBerry to leave Pakistan after refusing to ditch user privacy | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The Canadian company has taken a stand against demands for "backdoor" access to its services, including encrypted email and messages.
Richard Platt's insight:

BlackBerry will shut down operations in Pakistan at year's end because demands from the country's Telecommunications Authority would result in a massive invasion of user privacy, the company said Monday.  BlackBerry refuses to agree to the Pakistani government's order to monitor BlackBerry Enterprise Services (BES), including encrypted emails and BBM messages sent and received in the country  "Pakistan's demand was not a question of public safety; we are more than happy to assist law enforcement agencies in investigations of criminal activity," Beard said. "Rather, Pakistan was essentially demanding unfettered access to all of our BES customers' information."  Governments, accustomed to tapping phone lines and opening mail in decades past, want access to people's digital data to help stop crime and security threats. However, especially in the wake of revelations from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about massive surveillance by the US and UK, tech companies have been wrestling with government data requests that they believe can go too far.

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Is Amazon's online storage really 'unlimited'? Read the fine print

Is Amazon's online storage really 'unlimited'? Read the fine print | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Amazon's Black Friday offer of "unlimited" storage in its Amazon Cloud Drive service has been getting plenty of attention. But read the terms of service before you dive in, and you'll find some substantial limits. Here are the details.
Richard Platt's insight:

Not a positive review of the Amazon Unlimited Storage that isn't all that good of a storage service deal.  Read on for details.

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Hack of toy maker VTech exposes families - CNET

Hack of toy maker VTech exposes families - CNET | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
A hacker got into a customer database for the Learning Lodge app store, where parents can download apps, games and e-books for VTech toys.
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VTech, a Chinese company that makes popular electronic toys for kids, had its app store hacked.  An "unauthorized party" accessed customer information in a database for VTech's Learning Lodge app store on November 14, the company said in a statement Friday. The app store lets parents download apps, games, e-books and educational content to VTech toys.  The hacked database contains customer data including name, email address, password, IP address, mailing address and download history. It does not contain credit card information, the company said.  VTech has not said how many customers were affected, but Motherboard, which first reported the hack, said information on nearly 5 million parents and more than 200,000 kids was exposed. The hacked data included kids' first names, genders and birthdays.

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Apple's Tim Cook declares the end of the PC and hints at new medical product

Apple's Tim Cook declares the end of the PC and hints at new medical product | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Exclusive interview: The Apple boss has two missions - taking on the office PC with his new devices and keeping his customers safe from cyber criminals
Richard Platt's insight:

I think if you’re looking at a PC, why would you buy a PC anymore? No really, why would you buy one?”, asks Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive, who has just flown into Britain for the launch of the iPad Pro. Cook, whose spotless tailored suit and red poppy belies the fact that he spent the night in a plane, is clearly in ebullient mood. Wall Street and the City are obsessed with the iPhone, the company’s dominant product, but Apple appears quietly confident that its new tablet and TV device are going to help power the company’s continuing growth.  “Yes, the iPad Pro is a replacement for a notebook or a desktop for many, many people. They will start using it and conclude they no longer need to use anything else, other than their phones,” Cook argues in his distinctly Southern accent (he was born in Alabama). He highlights two other markets for his 12.9 inch devices, which go on sale online on Wednesday. The first are creatives: “if you sketch then it’s unbelievable..you don’t want to use a pad anymore," Cook says.  The second is music and movie consumers: the sound system and speakers are so powerful that the iPad appears to pulsate in one’s hands when one plays a video.  Some consumers use the iPad mini to read in bed, he says, finding it more relaxing than using a phone and the busyness that goes with it. That won’t change, he believes. “But I think it clearly created some cannibalisation - which we knew would occur - but we don’t really spend any time worrying about that, because as long as we cannibalise [ourselves], it’s fine," Cook laughs.   The other real excitement - apart from the iPad - lies with the new Apple TV, which has just been launched. You can talk to it, and search for your favourite programme. Early sales are exceptional, he intimates: “We got out of the shoot extremely strong; very strong in the first few days.” A key gauge of the success for such products is the number of apps being developed; Cook says that “it’s much larger than we would have predicted.” He also says that the apps being developed envisage a much wider variety of activities being conducted via the TV, which is another good sign as to the device’s future success and “will really change the living room entirely”. The apps already on offer include games, of course, but also property, home rentals, yoga and health.

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Google surpasses Apple as world's most valuable company

Google surpasses Apple as world's most valuable company | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
After beating Wall Street expectations for the fourth quarter of 2015, Google umbrella company Alphabet usurped Apple as the most valuable company in the world on Monday in after hours trading.
Richard Platt's insight:

For the fourth quarter, Alphabet raked in $21.3 billion in total sales and adjusted profits of $8.67 for every Class A share, the company said in a prepared statement. Total sales were up 18 year over year, while advertising revenue was up 17 percent for the same period.   Alphabet is seeing a renaissance in growth as its advertising business made big gains this quarter. The company's services division also saw wider adoption including Gmail, which passed one billion users in quarter four. Under the Alphabet umbrella, Google's "moonshot" projects" — Wi-Fi balloons, self-driving cars, glucose-reading contact lenses, human longevity — saw advancements, but cost the firm more than $3.56 billion over the last three months of 2015.   Apple, meanwhile, is losing ground after sitting as the world's most valuable company for more than three years. The iPhone maker reached the position in 2011 and throughout most of 2012 before being unseated by Exxon in 2013. Apple retook the lead later that year.   Despite bringing in revenue of $75.9 billion in a record-breaking first quarter, Apple stock is shedding value amid iPhone growth concerns and quickly diminishing iPad sales. For the current quarter, Apple expects year-over-year iPhone unit sales to decline for the first time since the handset launched in 2007.

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FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Pokes Hornet’s Nest As Cable Industry Torches Cable Box Proposal

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Pokes Hornet’s Nest As Cable Industry Torches Cable Box Proposal | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
It’s hard to believe that anyone in the United States expects the cable industry to react quickly to anything; be it customer complaints, innovation, or even something as simple as showing up on time for a scheduled service appointments. However, if you threaten a steady revenue stream for America’s cable giants, there’s sure to be a swift
Richard Platt's insight:

As you might expect, the cable industry is fuming mad and issued lightning quick retorts to the proposal. According to the cable industry: The proposal, like prior federal government technology mandates, would impose costs on consumers, adversely impact the creation of high-quality content, and chill innovation. It also flies in the face of the rapid changes that are occurring in the marketplace and benefitting consumers. — Mark Hess, Comcast SVP, Office of the Chief Technology Officer, Business and Industry Affairs.  Customers that want to keep the status quo and rent a cable box could still do so if they wish. In essence, it would be similar to what’s possible now with Internet service provided by cable companies — you can either rent a cable modem or purchase your own and save on monthly rental fees. The only difference between the FCC proposal and the cable companies offering is that you’d pay a relatively low, one-time cost for the hardware (which would pay for itself in roughly a year if we take into account monthly cable box rental fees) instead of paying the same $7.43 monthly (a fee that has risen 185 percent in the past twenty years) for the rest of your life.  FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is showing a rather icy resolve to this blowback from the cable industry and exhibits no signs of melting under pressure. He hit back hard, saying the FCC proposal is "all about whether the standard for set-top boxes should be a closed standard or an open standard.  "99% of pay-TV customers lease set-top boxes from there cable, satellite, or telco providers. There is no competitive market." Wheeler went on to reiterate that the cost of cable box hardware and rental fees have skyrocketed while the price of other consumer electronics (like PCs and smartphones) have decreased by 90 percent during the same time period.  - Me thinks the Cable Companies doth protest too much



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Apple loses more ground to Google's Chromebook in education market

Apple loses more ground to Google's Chromebook in education market | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Microsoft leads worldwide, but school districts are moving to lower-cost devices.
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The 5 coolest things Samsung unveiled at CES 2016

The 5 coolest things Samsung unveiled at CES 2016 | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The annual Consumer Electronics Show is the biggest consumer tech event of the year, and Samsung typically has the biggest presence among large CE companies at the show.
Richard Platt's insight:

Samsung’s new SUHD TVs cover all sizes up to 89 inches and where smart features are concerned, the new high-end TVs all feature smart home elements from Samsung’s SmartThings platform in addition to standard smart TV features like app support. I see a lot of strategic moves by Samsung with their latest offerings in the SUHD line up, these could break new ground that other firms have yet to be able to match, at least on the high end.

Samsung Galaxy TabPro S:  The new notebook features a smart design, lightweight build and a beautiful 12-inch Super AMOLED display with 2K resolution. The tablet itself is 6.3 millimeters thick and weighs just 693 grams, yet it packs a battery that can deliver up to 10.5 hours of usage per charge.

Samsung rink: Samsung’s Gear VR is one of the most fun new products we’ve used in the past couple of years, created in partnership with the virtual reality experts at Oculus. Now, Samsung’s new rink controllers push things to the next level.

Samsung Welt:  is a smart wearable healthcare belt that looks like a normal belt, thus offering consumers a more discreet way of using smart sensor technology to monitor their health,” Samsung said in a blog post. WELT is capable of recording the user’s waist size, eating habits and the number of steps taken, as well as time spent sitting down. It then sends this data to a specially-designed app for analysis, and the production of a range of personalized healthcare and weight management plans.” fitness bands don’t really blend well with formal wear, this makes it easier to use such a device.

Family Hub Refrigerator:  A $5,000 fridge? Seriously?  I am reserving comment on the value add of this technology, given that I can appreciate that there are other technologies that need to be enabled outside of the fridge to really make it work well for consumers.

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Samsung is securing its smart TVs before they control your house

Samsung is securing its smart TVs before they control your house | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Samsung has announced a new "three-layer security solution" named GAIA for its range of smart TVs, with the aim of securing information stored on the devices themselves (e.g. account passwords and...
Richard Platt's insight:

Samsung has announced a new "three-layer security solution" named GAIA for its range of smart TVs, with the aim of securing information stored on the devices themselves (e.g. account passwords and credit card information) as well as data transmitted "between the TV and [Internet of Things] service servers."  This last point is particularly important given the company's recently-announced plans to turn its smart TVs into hubs for IoT devices around your home. Yesterday, Samsung said its range of premium SUHD TVs will work with any SmartThings compatible devices from 2016, meaning that in the future, your Samsung TV could control everything from security cameras to lighting and motion sensors. This makes securing the TV itself even more important — in a network of connected devices, the whole chain is only as secure as the weakest link.  In many ways, making the TV into a sort of central control panel for your super-smart home makes a lot of sense. It (probably) occupies a central position in one of your rooms at home, it's got a big screen, and you're not going to misplace it. However, smart TVs including Samsung's have already been criticized for their ability to spy on users, so security systems like GAIA have quite a lot to prove before they'll be fully trusted.

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Google and Ford to build self-driving car company, report claims

Google and Ford to build self-driving car company, report claims | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Google is planning to announce a partnership with Ford to create an independent company that will build self-driving cars, according to a report.
Richard Platt's insight:

Google and Ford plan to announce at CES that they will partner to create an independent company to build autonomous vehicles.  According to three sources "familiar with the plans" believe Ford will announce the partnership in January at the Consumer Electronics Show. Neither Ford nor Google would confirm the partnership plans.  Jeremy Carlson, a senior analyst with IHS Automotive, said during a webcast last week that Google is serious about spinning off a separate autonomous car company. Carlson said sources believed Google would develop service-only vehicles and not a traditional car manufacturing business.

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IDC Predicts First Smartphone Industry Downturn

IDC Predicts First Smartphone Industry Downturn | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

“This has never happened before. The global smartphone market is posting its first single-digital growth year on record, which actually signifies a downturn in consumer demand.”


Via massimo facchinetti, Jesús Hernández
Richard Platt's insight:

According to the latest Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker from market research firm IDC. IDC predicts worldwide shipments will grow 9.8% to hit 1.43 billion units this year, thanks in part to slowing growth in Latin America, Western Europe and the Asia Pacific. The slower-than-expected growth actually signifies an industry downturn.  And that’s not the worst of the bad news for smartphone makers. That slowing growth is going to get even slowing through 2019, IDC predicts, due largely to lower Windows Phone sales, as well as fewer sales of phones running platforms outside Android, iOS and Windows Phone.  Anthony Scarsella, a research manager with IDC's Mobile Phones team, expects consumers to migrate toward affordable high-value handsets and financing options on pricier models. He predicts handset makers will try to push device financing and trade-in options across many of the developed markets as growth in these markets is expected to primarily come from replacement purchases and second devices.

“Apple has taken the lead with its iPhone Upgrade Program, and several other vendors are expected to implement similar plans in the months ahead,” Scarsella said. “These plans could represent the most effective way to get flagship devices into the hands of consumers while speeding up the upgrade cycle through trade-in and incentives."

Looking at mobile operating systems, IDC bets Android’s market share, which currently sits at 81 percent, will rise to 82% by 2019. Apple’s iOS has climbed 7.6% of the market and IDC’s forecasts calls for the operating system to hover at the 14 - 15% range, seeing boosts around product launches.

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Samsung to pay Apple $548M over patent dispute

Samsung to pay Apple $548M over patent dispute | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Samsung has agreed to pay Apple $548m (£362m) as part of a deal to settle a long-running patent dispute.
Richard Platt's insight:

Samsung has agreed to pay Apple $548M as part of a deal to settle a long-running patent dispute.  The arrangement was revealed in papers filed to a California court by both companies on Thursday.  The dispute began in 2011 when Apple said Samsung was using some of its patented technologies without permission.  The payment does not mean the end of the row as, next year, a US court will decide if Apple deserves more damages.  The payment is part of a bigger $1bn damages award that Apple was granted in 2012 by a jury that considered the case. That total was reduced on appeal to $930m. Further legal action split this total into two parts - a $548m chunk for technology patents and a $382m chunk for allegations that Samsung copied Apple's packaging materials.  "After years of not getting a cent, more than half a billion dollars is significant," wrote patent expert Florian Mueller in a blogpost.  However, he added, the continuing uncertainty about the validity of some Apple patents and Samsung's plans to file fresh appeals meant the case was a long way from reaching resolution.

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Former MSFT CEO says Windows 10 universal apps "won't work" and questions revenue projections

Former MSFT CEO says Windows 10 universal apps "won't work" and questions revenue projections | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Steve Ballmer, who remains Microsoft's largest shareholder, offered some scathing criticism of how the company is reporting its revenues and profit margins from cloud services and hardware, as well as its universal app strategy for wooing developers to create apps for Windows devices.
Richard Platt's insight:

Speaking at the company's shareholder meeting, as noted in report by Dina Bass for Bloomberg, Microsoft's outspoken former chief executive first took aim its cloud services and hardware business, which the company has touted as key to replacing lost licensing revenues from a PC industry in decline.  Rather than reporting actual revenues and disclosing profit margins across all of its cloud services, the company has only offered a "run rate," an extrapolation that assumes revenues remained constant throughout the year based on a snapshot of real data.   Microsoft reported 44% gross margins on its commercial cloud business, but does not report its total profits from cloud services or hardware.  Ballmer pointed out hardware and cloud services—two businesses the company has been pursuing since Satya Nadella took over as chief executive in 2014—contribute far lower margins than software.  "It's sort of a key metric," Ballmer said. "If they talk about it as key to the company, they should report it." Ballmer specifically called Microsoft's reporting of a revenue run rate "bullshit."  When a shareholder asked Nadella to address the lack of apps for its Windows Phone platform, the company's current chief executive outlined his Windows universal apps strategy, which hopes to entice developers to create new software that can run on both desktop and tablet Windows 10 PCs and Windows Phone.  Ballmer began talking over the top of Nadella, stating "that won't work," and saying that Microsoft should instead develop software to enable users to run Android apps on Windows Phone.   This spring, Microsoft announced plans for Windows 10 and Windows Phone to run a new type of universal Windows 10 app, while also enabling developers to easily port their software from Android or iOS into universal Windows apps.   Further, given that the vast majority of Windows PC users have older OS versions installed, developers wanting to target Windows desktop users are far more likely to write conventional Win32 apps than learn an entirely new development style specifically to target a minority of Windows PCs and the extremely small segment of Windows Phones and tablets that can't run conventional Windows software.  In October, Ballmer said in an televised interview that he believed Microsoft represented the only serious competition to Apple.  "If there's going to be any competition at all for Apple it will come from Microsoft," Ballmer said, adding that unlike Samsung, Microsoft has the "software and the hardware capability" to offer real competition.

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How Samsung Became a Design Powerhouse

How Samsung Became a Design Powerhouse | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The electronics manufacturer now emphasizes design over efficiency.
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More detail on the Samsung Corporate Design Center and how it enables all of the different divisions within Samsung.  1st it was TRIZ methods being employed and deployed across the enterprise, and now it is design thinking too.  Interesting.

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With the Lenovo Razer Edition PC, two companies launch a gaming hardware partnership

With the Lenovo Razer Edition PC, two companies launch a gaming hardware partnership | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Lenovo's future is looking pretty black and green as it tries to secure some much-needed gaming cred. Razer brings that gaming cachet, while Lenovo brings the money and manufacturing means Razer lacks. This seemingly unlikely partnership could be a good thing.
Richard Platt's insight:

For now, it's just have a partnership announcement. It's an unexpected but (probably) smart move for Lenovo, which, despite a strong presence in “mainstream” computing, lacks cachet within the gaming niche. See also: Why Dell bought and maintains the Alienware brand despite the fact it could easily pump out Dell-branded gaming PCs if it wanted.  Razer brings much-needed gaming cachet

“We want to move beyond just the mainstream, and we think partnering with Razer and getting some of that unique DNA we can start to reach up more into the performance and enthusiast space,”said Rios when I spoke to him last week.  Razer might be the bigger winner here. With its Blade laptop and the Project Christine prototype from a few years back, it's clear Razer wants to expand beyond its gaming peripheral roots and into full-on PCs. This partnership lets Razer “make PCs” without, you know, making PCs. Lenovo can do most of the heavy lifting.  Or as Razer CEO Min-Liang Tan puts it in this press release, “Lenovo is the world’s #1 PC maker. Razer is the world’s #1 gaming lifestyle brand.”

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Lenovo Delivers Solid 2nd Quarter FY15-16 Operational Results

Lenovo Delivers Solid 2nd Quarter FY15-16 Operational Results | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Lenovo Group has announced results for its second fiscal quarter ended September 30, 2015. Quarterly revenue was US$12.2 billion, a 16 percent year-over-year increase or 23 percent year-over-year in constant currency. Second quarter run rate pre-tax income, which excludes restructuring costs, one time charges, and non-cash, M&A-related accounting charges, was US$166 million, up 16 percent quarter-to-quarter, while Lenovo’s official reported Hong Kong Financial Reporting Standards (HKFRS) pre-tax loss was US$842 million**. Second quarter net loss was US$714 million.

Via massimo facchinetti
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Comcast leak shows that data caps aren't about congestion

Comcast leak shows that data caps aren't about congestion | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Many internet providers with data caps (especially in mobile) will tell you that those limits exist to prevent network congestion -- that's not necessarily true, but it's the official line. However, Comcast isn't even trying to make that claim.
Richard Platt's insight:

Many internet providers with data caps (especially in mobile) will tell you that those limits exist to prevent network congestion -- that's not necessarily true, but it's the official line. However, Comcast isn't even trying to make that claim. Leaked support documents show that the cable giant's customer service reps will deny that the expanding internet caps are about congestion in any form. Instead, the ceilings are about "fairness" and offering a "more flexible policy" to subscribers. Also, Comcast is telling agents to avoid describing cap-free areas as having unlimited usage. Instead, staffers are supposed to tell you that unfettered areas are still subject to Comcast's longstanding 250GB soft cap -- the company just isn't "currently enforcing" the limit. In other words... it's unlimited.

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