International Fiction
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Judi Hurst
Scoop.it!

Is it really necessary to translate Arabic literature?

Is it really necessary to translate Arabic literature? | International Fiction | Scoop.it
A translation (the irony!) of author Ibrahim Farghali's essay on the translation of Arabic literature as published here on his blog. I have for a while now, in my capacity as a journalist and write...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Judi Hurst from Discover Sigalon Valley - Where the Tags are the Topics
Scoop.it!

Mo Yan - Wikipedia

Guan Moye (simplified Chinese: 管谟业; traditional Chinese: 管謨業; pinyin: Guǎn Móyè; born 17 February 1955), better known by the pen name Mo Yan (/m jɛn/, Chinese: 莫言; pinyin: Mò Yán), is a Chinese novelist and short story writer. He has been referred by Donald Morrison of U.S. news magazine TIME as "one of the most famous, oft-banned and widely pirated of all Chinese writers",[1] and by Jim Leach as the Chinese answer to Franz Kafka or Joseph Heller.[2] He is best known to Western readers for his 1987 novel Red Sorghum Clan, of which the Red Sorghum and Sorghum Wine volumes were later adapted for the film Red Sorghum. In 2012, Mo was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for his work as a writer "who with hallucinatory realism merges folk tales, history and the contemporary".[3][4]

Mo Yan was born in 1955, in Gaomi County in Shandong province to a family of farmers, in Dalan Township (which he fictionalised in his novels as "Northeast Township" of Gaomi County). Mo was 11 years old when the Cultural Revolution was launched, at which time he left school to work as a farmer. At the age of 18, he began work at a cotton factory. During this period, which coincided with a succession of political campaigns from the Great Leap Forward to the Cultural Revolution, his access to literature was largely limited to novels in the socialist realist style under Mao Zedong, which centered largely on the themes of class struggle and conflict.[5]

At the close of the Cultural Revolution in 1976, Mo enlisted in the People's Liberation Army (PLA),[6] and began writing while he was still a soldier. During this post-Revolution era when he emerged as a writer, both the lyrical and epic works of Chinese literature, as well as translations of foreign authors such as William Faulkner and Gabriel García Márquez, would make an impact on his works.[7] In 1984, he received a literary award from the PLA Magazine, and the same year began attending the Military Art Academy, where he first adopted the pen name of Mo Yan.[8] He published his first novella, A Transparent Radish, in 1984, and released Red Sorghum in 1986, launching his career as a nationally recognized novelist.[8] In 1991, he obtained a master's degree in Literature from Beijing Normal University.[6]

Biography

Mo Yan was born in the northeast Gaomi township in Shandong province to a family of farmers. He left school during the Cultural Revolution to work in a factory that produced oil. He joined the People's Liberation Army at age twenty, and began writing while he was still a soldier, in 1981. Three years later, he was given a teaching position at the Department of Literature in the Army's Cultural Academy. In 1991, he got the Master degree in Literature from Beijing Normal University.

 

Work

"Mo Yan"—meaning "don't speak" in Chinese—is a pen name.[4] In a public speech delivered at the Open University of Hong Kong, he said that the name was chosen when he wrote his first novel. Because he was well known to be frank in his speech, which was not welcomed in mainland China, he chose the name to remind himself not to speak too much.

 

Mo Yan has published dozens of short stories and novels in Chinese. His first novel was Falling Rain on a Spring Night, published in 1981. Several of his novels have been translated into English by Howard Goldblatt, professor of East Asian languages and literatures at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Mo Yan's works are predominantly social commentary, and he is strongly influenced by the political critique of Lu Xun and the magical realism of Gabriel García Márquez. Using dazzling, complex, and often graphically violent images, Mo Yan draws readers into the disturbing yet beautiful, kaleidoscopic universes of his stories. He sets many of his stories near his hometown, Northeast Gaomi Township in Shandong province.

 

Extremely prolific, Mo Yan wrote his latest novel, Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out in only 43 days. He composed the more than 500,000 characters contained in the original manuscript on traditional Chinese paper using only ink and a writing brush.

 

The Chinese writer Ma Jian has deplored the lack of solidarity and commitment of Mo Yan vis-a-vis other Chinese writers and intellectuals who were punished and/or detained despite the freedom of expression recognized by the Constitution.[5]

 

Mo Yan has been censured for hand-copying Mao Zedong's Yan'an Talks on Literature and Art in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the speech.

 

Before 2012, he was known to western readers primarily for two novels which formed the basis of the film Red Sorghum. That year he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for his work as a writer "who with hallucinatory realism merges folk tales, history and the contemporary"


Via Sigalon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Judi Hurst from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Asian Literature at a Crossroads

Asian Literature at a Crossroads | International Fiction | Scoop.it
The greatest promise of the Man Asian Literary Prize is its potential to expose Asian readers to writers from within the region, writes prize judge Maya Jaggi.

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.