international education
17 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Measuring America's Decline, in Three Charts

Measuring America's Decline, in Three Charts | international education | Scoop.it
Taken together, these education statistics vividly illustrate some of the challenges facing an economic hegemon plagued by wage stagnation and rising inequality.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Are Americans dumb? No, it's the inequality, stupid - The Guardian

Are Americans dumb? No, it's the inequality, stupid - The Guardian | international education | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Are Americans dumb? No, it's the inequality, stupid The Guardian Just a quick scan of the countries that fared really well in all three categories (Norway, Sweden, Japan, Finland and the Netherlands) compared to the countries that...
Shane Bannon's insight:

This article was extremely liberal and often seems to only use the topic of education to further point fingers at the Republican party, but it does have some interesting points. The author writes that the key reason for countries like the US and the UK doing so poorly on international testing is not overall stupidity or lack of an educational system. It is the severe inequality within the countries. With the inequality seen in these countries, a trend always occurs. Those who hold the majority of resources are vastly outnumbered by those who have very little. The disproportionate gap between the educational systems available to the elite and those available to the poor places most people on the latter side. A country with a smaller gap will allow everybody to do relatively well. The bills that have been passed to cut education in the US also disproportionately affect those in low income environments because more money must often be given through federal grants to these schools. Without it, the schools are starved for funding and in return starve their students of education.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Reihan Salam - The Benefits of Improving U.S. Educational Performance

Reihan Salam - The Benefits of Improving U.S. Educational Performance | international education | Scoop.it
Jim Pethokoukis discusses the results of a new survey of the skills of adults residing in OECD countries, the subject of a recent article in the New York Times: New OECD education tests show that among adults in advanced economies, the US ranks...
Shane Bannon's insight:

US students are ranking poorly against their peers in similar countries, but the nation continues to thrive at this point. The artical points at the correlation between this and the US's history with education. As one of the first countries to bring on universal secondary education, it has been able to stay ahead of other countries. This serves as a problem as the older generations of Americans retire and we are left with a half baked generation. The article looks at projected GDP growth over the next 80 years. If we do nothing to improve the education system, it will already more than double. If we match Canada's scores on international testing, GDp with quadruple. If we match Singapore, GDP will grow six fold. I am not sure if I believe this. I know very little about GDP, but just doubling seems to be a great improvement. Upon looking at the GDP growth sinse 1950, we can see the rate of its change increasing quickly, but I am skeptical to the idea that it can continue to grow at this rate with or without improvements to education. I was appalled to see the percentages of students in the different states who show profficiency in math. Even those who come from "elite" households, have a much lower rate of proficiency than their international peers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

RSA Animate - Changing Education Paradigms

This RSA Animate was adapted from a talk given at the RSA by Sir Ken Robinson, world-renowned education and creativity expert and recipient of the RSA's Benj...
Shane Bannon's insight:

The system of education is one that is severely outdated. The idea of public education came to pass in the mid-eighteen hundreds and has not changed significantly since then. It was built around the ideas of industrialisation and focuses on the subjects prominant within the period of enlightenment that took place at that time. Schools work like factories "pumping out batches of children". We are placed in classes based on the idea that the most important identifying factors within the sducation systems are our ages. This seems like the most logical method for me and other methods would be very hard to bring on if not impossible. Placing children in classes based upon them being introverts or extraverts is quite difficult. I do agree that classes are degined for certain students to thrive, but I still think that it is quite difficult to change the structure so to allow everyone to thrive. I think that it is most important to make schooling as accepting and accomodating as possible for each individual situation. It was also said that the connection between higher education and careers is less prominent in the minds of youth than it has been in the past. With role models like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs who dropped our of their schools, this is very understandable. I find myself thinking less and less about following the path set out by the institution of education, and more about the less paved paths around it towards riches and general happiness. Some of these thoughts come out of our system of education. We are tought that it does not matter whether or not we function within and contribute to our society, but that we make money off of it. Due to that, I often find myself straying away from the jobs that help and find myself more and more attracted to the jobs that are glamorous to me.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Japan’s Education Minister Aims to Foster Global Talents

Japan’s Education Minister Aims to Foster Global Talents | international education | Scoop.it
Hakubun Shimomura explains in an interview how the government plans to make Japanese universities more competitive internationally.
Shane Bannon's insight:
The Prime Minister of Japan was interviewed on his plan to strengthen Japan's educational system. He calles his plan "Abenomics". More than anything, he wants to lift productivity in his nation. He seems most concerned with his country from an economic standpoint. Japan has a history of isolating itself from the global education system, but now Minister Hakubun Shimomura hopes to bring outside teachers into the country. He also plans to allow for better english programs and classes in the language so that more international students may want to enter the system in the future. He recognizes that "diverse talents, leadership skills and human empathy" are more important than ones basic knowledge, but the system continues to contradict that idealism. It is interesting that his own son is studying in England for a degree in fashion design. That is so against what he has been talking about, but it is nice that he does not feel the need to control his own son.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from international education
Scoop.it!

Op-ed: The Swedish Model for Economic Recovery

So it is a refreshing—and brilliant—decision by President Obama to visit Sweden and meet with Scandinavian prime ministers en route to next week's Group of 20 summit in Russia. Sweden ...
Shane Bannon's insight:
This article was about how Sweden has acted in the face of economic turmoil. I like that it looks at the benefit of education through an economic light. It talks about slashing unemployment benefits and sick leave compensation in favor of aiding education. In the country, all children recieve education vouchers so that parents can choose the kind of facility that they want to send their children to. It is however onesided and does not hint at why this strategy would be much more dangerous and difficult in the US. I would like to see a perspective on why some of these strategies would be much more difficult to follow up on in the United States. I would have also liked the article to have been more about education from an economic perspective than how Sweden treats its education system from an economic point of view.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Why Can't America Be Sweden? - NYTimes.com

Why Can't America Be Sweden? - NYTimes.com | international education | Scoop.it
Economists disagree about what would happen to global economic innovation if the United States adopted the social welfare policies of Scandinavian countries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Britain is the only major economy to have paid more than its 'fair share ... - Daily Mail

Britain is the only major economy to have paid more than its 'fair share ... - Daily Mail | international education | Scoop.it
Daily Mail
Britain is the only major economy to have paid more than its 'fair share ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Should America try to be like Scandinavia? – Global Public Square ...

Should America try to be like Scandinavia? – Global Public Square ... | international education | Scoop.it
But I'm also struck by the rise of Scandinavia, a region that includes Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and if you broaden that definition, Finland and Iceland. Each of these countries seem to dominate global ranking lists.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from international education
Scoop.it!

School's In - New York Times

School's In - New York Times | international education | Scoop.it
School's In
New York Times
According to the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (O.E.C.D.), in 2009 the United States ranked 25th in math and 21st in science of 34 O.E.C.D.
Shane Bannon's insight:
This article is made up of a series of responses about the book "Smartest Kids in the World". It is a book about the inferiority of the US education system when compared to much more successeful countries. I enjoy this article because it shares many opposing points of view to this mentality. It brings up the distinction between testing meritocracy and talent meritocracy. While the US is rated low on testing, these responses ask just how much smarter these kids in other countries actually are. It also looks at how race plays into education and the patterns correlating it to testing scores in America. I really love the quote, "When American test scores are compared with those from Europe and Asia, all American students are weighed against a small academic elite. If every European or Asian student, in both kinds of schools, were tested against every American student, the scores would even out." I am not entirely certain that it is true, but it is still something that I had not considered before. Someone in the article also demonstrates the hostility that America has towards education and goes as far as to say that this is the reason for sports being such a prominant fixture duing high school.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from Finland
Scoop.it!

U.S. should look abroad for education reform, study says - San Jose Mercury News

U.S. should look abroad for education reform, study says - San Jose Mercury News | international education | Scoop.it

At the request of U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, the study looks at Finland, Japan, the Canadian province of Ontario, Shanghai and Singapore, all of whose students score near the top on international tests. Over decades, all five designed and improved their education systems. The study looks at strategies of those successful systems, Tucker said, because it makes sense for the U.S. to bench mark the best.


Via Ulla M. Saikku
more...
Shane Bannon's curator insight, September 19, 2013 12:23 PM
This article was about the failures of the US education system and how they have been mended in other countries. It references Canada, Japan, Finland, Singapore, and Shanghai as having some of the best education systems in the world. It spoke to the subjects of teachers, charter schools, and gateway testing. I am very interested by the idea of treating teachers with as much respect as engineers or scientists, as they are developing the nation's future. The idea of a centralized education system being more beneficial than charter schools was also a very different one than what I had heard about charters. I would also like to see the social conditions of the countries and how they relate to the education systems.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from Cross Border Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Quality of Swedish universities ‘too low’

Quality of Swedish universities ‘too low’ | international education | Scoop.it
Sweden’s Education Minister has some harsh words for the country’s universities Echoing the views of the Ugandan President on his country’s higher education system, Sweden’s Education Minister, Jan Björklund, has been speaking out: “The quality of...

Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from Finland
Scoop.it!

Gove should look to Finland for a Master class | Pencilandpapertest

Gove should look to Finland for a Master class | Pencilandpapertest | international education | Scoop.it

Michael Gove has hopped around the globe to find the ideas and the justification for his education policies; Singapore, Sweden, the U.S, Canada and Finland regularly pop up as the inspiration for everything from free schools to curriculum reform.

Of course, it would be wrong-headed to close our eyes to innovation, whether it’s in a school next door or a classroom in Kuala Lumpur.

Equally, there are difficulties with directly importing policies from overseas, not least because of the social, economic, cultural and historical differences from one country to the next.


Via Ulla M. Saikku
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Do Illegal Immigrants Actually Hurt the U.S. Economy?

Do Illegal Immigrants Actually Hurt the U.S. Economy? | international education | Scoop.it
Undocumented workers represent a classic economic challenge with a fairly straightforward solution.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Adding up the ways we're falling behind in education - Macleans.ca

Adding up the ways we're falling behind in education - Macleans.ca | international education | Scoop.it
Adding up the ways we're falling behind in education
Macleans.ca
On Tuesday the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released a global report on adult skills based on surveys of 166,000 people in 23 countries.
Shane Bannon's insight:

I have been seeing a lot of the PIAAC (Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies). It is a survey that was administered recently to  a wide variety of people in 23 countries in order to assess Adult competency in the subjects covered in grade school. This survey is different than most tests because it is administered to adults within the workforce rather than the children who spend much of their time studying for the specific purpose of passing these tests. The PIAAC aims to measure how adults are doing later in life in realtion to their education and the more permanant ideas embodied within. This article is about Canada's place within the tests and how they feel they are falling behind in the subject of mathematics. This article also served to explain the difference between well educated countries and powerful countries. The perfect example, the US, shows us that based on past wealth and accumulated power, a country can still carry an incredible amount of weight even while it struggles in the realm of education. The data in this survey in no way reflects the past. It reflects the future. Countries that are ranked higher on the list will most likely do much better in the generations to come. There is a severe imbalace in the educational systems written about in this article. The most amazing example of this for me was that university graduates in Italy rank lower than high school graduates in Japan. Data like that gives Japan an incredible leg up in functional society.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

In Cumberland, new math lessons replace 'Investigations' | The Valley Breeze

In Cumberland, new math lessons replace 'Investigations' | The Valley Breeze | international education | Scoop.it
Shane Bannon's insight:

This article is about the particular desicions of one districts around its system of education and how it is affecting the students individually. It includes the decision of a 1st grader who already feels that she isn't good at math. This line got me thinking about just how much of an impact a specific curriculum maight have on a student at such an early age in their development. If she begins falling behind in math now and just decides to stop trying because she isn't good enough, she still has all of grade school to fall behind even more. They talk about "Common Core State Standards" forcing schools to increase rigor levels at earlier ages and some argue that 'It's not bad to teach  the test if the test represents accepted international standards". This makes me wonder about the flaws in these standards. If schools truly feel the need to adhere to these standards, they should work for everyone. I have a feeling that these standards that they speak of do not take into account many different social and cultural factors that change how a different group of students might best learn. The very idea of international standards seems a bit antiproductive to me for this reason. In addition, the article gave the judgements given by parents as their students begin to be taught not just how to do math, but why and how it works. Though it seems meaningless to them, these strategies in teaching a subject teach kids why something is important and should be learned. They prepare kids for the rest of their educational careers by igniting their curiosity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

What's Holding American Students Back? The SAT

What's Holding American Students Back? The SAT | international education | Scoop.it
Conceived as a way to identify talent, standardized testing is leaving too many students behind. The U.S. needs new answers
Shane Bannon's insight:

This article is about all of the different factors that are contributing to the US's problems with aducation according to the President of the University of Wyoming. He describes college-admissions testsas "IQ tests in disguise" that only discourage youth from persuing education more vigorously. He states that by using these tests, schools are searching for less important traits in their students. While they seem to be looking for nothing more than IQ/intelligence/cleverness, they should be looking for other traits such as creativity, life experience, and other more practical skills that allow students to grow into contributing members of society. America is in a skill gap crisis. The people who do not go into higher education are most often not skilled enough to take on the middle class jobs necessary for the country to function. It is very interesting to hear that SAT scores are "highly correlated with family income" and are often seen as nothing more than a "wealth test". The SATs are being fought against by certain schools, but they are still very strongly entwined with the college process.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Japan's Bad Education

Japan's Bad Education | international education | Scoop.it
Everyone's equally special—and stifled—in the country's ossified school system.
Shane Bannon's insight:
The prime minister of Japan wants to drive the education system, but is doing so in the wrong ways. Japan's largest problem in their functionality within the worldwide community is their "homogeneity and discomfort with individuality". There is also more weight put on grades than there is on learning itself. Because of this, many onlookers see a facade that gives the image of a strong system, while those inside are wounded in its shortcomings. Students are unhappy and dysfunctional with high rates of suicide and bullying. Rather than allow for a diversity of learning styles, officials began to dumb down learning and favor complete equality rather than the competition that stressed students to the point of suicide. "Textbooks were dumbed down—the mathematical constant pi was reduced to just "3"—and classes trudged at turtle pace, adjusting to slow learners." This information was almost unbelievable. The fact that they would actually give children incorrect information in order to allow them to understand it is preposterous in an educational facility.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

The Great Stagnation of American Education

The Great Stagnation of American Education | international education | Scoop.it
The decline in educational attainment — more high school dropouts, poor-quality schools — has serious consequences for the economy.
Shane Bannon's insight:
This article is about how the US education system has failed to advance the population in recent years. Economic output is no longer rising and the author blames many of the factors in this upon our faulty education system. High School graduation rate is actually dropping right now. This is partially due to the exponentially growing cost of schooling and the lack of financial aid that is going into the institutions. One commenter said that money is not the problem. She says that teachers should be coached on how to truly indictorate a love of learning into their students. I think that money is the problem because even if more children gain the drive to do well, there is currently only so much money to help them achieve a formal education. Drive only drives competition, but it does not change accessibility.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Op-ed: The Swedish Model for Economic Recovery

So it is a refreshing—and brilliant—decision by President Obama to visit Sweden and meet with Scandinavian prime ministers en route to next week's Group of 20 summit in Russia. Sweden ...
more...
Shane Bannon's curator insight, September 27, 2013 11:15 AM
This article was about how Sweden has acted in the face of economic turmoil. I like that it looks at the benefit of education through an economic light. It talks about slashing unemployment benefits and sick leave compensation in favor of aiding education. In the country, all children recieve education vouchers so that parents can choose the kind of facility that they want to send their children to. It is however onesided and does not hint at why this strategy would be much more dangerous and difficult in the US. I would like to see a perspective on why some of these strategies would be much more difficult to follow up on in the United States. I would have also liked the article to have been more about education from an economic perspective than how Sweden treats its education system from an economic point of view.
Scooped by Shane Bannon
Scoop.it!

Popular Education, Power and Democracy | NIACE

Popular Education, Power and Democracy | NIACE | international education | Scoop.it
A wide range of experts from leading universities in Sweden - alongside others from the UK, USA and Japan - have contributed to the book, providing a focus on the relevance of popular education internationally.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from international education
Scoop.it!

U.S. should look abroad for education reform, study says - San Jose Mercury News

U.S. should look abroad for education reform, study says - San Jose Mercury News | international education | Scoop.it

At the request of U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, the study looks at Finland, Japan, the Canadian province of Ontario, Shanghai and Singapore, all of whose students score near the top on international tests. Over decades, all five designed and improved their education systems. The study looks at strategies of those successful systems, Tucker said, because it makes sense for the U.S. to bench mark the best.


Via Ulla M. Saikku, Shane Bannon
Shane Bannon's insight:
This article was about the failures of the US education system and how they have been mended in other countries. It references Canada, Japan, Finland, Singapore, and Shanghai as having some of the best education systems in the world. It spoke to the subjects of teachers, charter schools, and gateway testing. I am very interested by the idea of treating teachers with as much respect as engineers or scientists, as they are developing the nation's future. The idea of a centralized education system being more beneficial than charter schools was also a very different one than what I had heard about charters. I would also like to see the social conditions of the countries and how they relate to the education systems.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university
Scoop.it!

Management, Education and Competitiveness: Europe, Japan and the United States

Management, Education and Competitiveness: Europe, Japan and the United States | international education | Scoop.it

Globally two processes are striking about modern management education. Firstly, management education is changing rapidly to meet new challenges from business and governments and to improve competitiveness. Secondly, management education has become one of the fastest growing areas in higher education. Management Education and Competitiveness provides a wide overview, including studies by scholars in nine countries in Europe, Japan and the United States. It examines how countries have developed different national courses in spite of strong influence from the American system of management education. It also examines the links between education and business. This collection of essays will be invaluable to managers and professionals in educational research and business administration.

 

Contents:

1 IntroductionPart I Different Systems of Management EducationPart II Management Education and Business

 

Source:

Management, Education and CompetitivenessEurope, Japan and the United StatesEdited by Rolv Petter Amdam

April 2013 by Routledge – 288 pages

Series: Routledge International Studies in Business History


Via wmijnhardt
more...
trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:48 AM
nice
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from SA, NEWS ON HIGHER EDUCATION
Scoop.it!

'Sweden needs to invest in science education' - The Local

'Sweden needs to invest in science education' - The Local | international education | Scoop.it
Tax cuts and simple market-oriented reforms are not enough to help Sweden remain a competitive and innovative country, argues liberal commentator Nima Sanandaji.

Via SAQA News Update
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shane Bannon from Ed Tech Chatter
Scoop.it!

Why The Future of Education Depends on Educational Technology

Why The Future of Education Depends on Educational Technology | international education | Scoop.it
As you probably know Norway and Sweden 's educational systems are the top leading ones in the world. I have recently read two or three articles about the reasons for this educational prosperity in...

Via Jon Samuelson
more...
No comment yet.