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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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The Economist:New research on how to close the achievement gap

The Economist:New research on how to close the achievement gap | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character. By Paul Tough. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 256 pages; $27. Random House; £12.99. Buy from...

Via Lou Salza
Lon Woodbury's insight:

This is examining the issues the early therapeutic (emotional growth) boarding schools were based on in the 1980s, many of which are still operating.  -Lon

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Lou Salza's curator insight, January 31, 2013 12:08 AM

Paul Tough, a journalist and former editor at the New York Times Magazine, aims to answer these thorny questions in “How Children Succeed”, an ambitious and elegantly written new book, now out in Britain. The problem, he writes, is that academic success is believed to be a product of cognitive skills—the kind of intelligence that gets measured in IQ tests. This view has spawned a vibrant market for brain-building baby toys, and an education-reform movement that sweats over test scores. But new research from a spate of economists, psychologists, neuroscientists and educators has found that the skills that see a student through college and beyond have less to do with smarts than with more ordinary personality traits, like an ability to stay focused and control impulses. The KIPP students who graduated from college were not the academic stars but the workhorses, the ones who plugged away at problems and resolved to do better.

So non-cognitive skills like persistence and curiosity are highly predictive of future success. But where do these traits come from? And how can they be developed? In search of answers, Mr Tough first looks at the problem on a neurological level. Apparently medical reasons explain why children who grow up in abusive or dysfunctional environments generally find it harder to concentrate, sit still and rebound from disappointments. The part of the brain most affected by early stress is the prefrontal cortex, which is critical for regulating thoughts and mediating behaviour. When this region is damaged—a common condition for children living amid the pressures of poverty—it is tougher to suppress unproductive instincts.

 
Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens
News and Opinion of Interest to Parents and Professionals Working with With Struggling Young People - Web Page www.strugglingteens.com
Curated by Lon Woodbury
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Woodbury Reports Places For Struggling Teens - News and Views

Woodbury Reports Places For Struggling Teens - News and Views | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

This is a supplemental publication of Woodbury Reports' Places for Struggling Teens, www.strugglingteens.com.  We search the Internet to find articles and opinions that might be helpful to professionals in the private parent-choice network, and parents working with teens with behavioral/emotional/learning problems.

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Benchmark Transitions-CA Celebrates 21st Anniversary

Benchmark Transitions-CA Celebrates 21st Anniversary | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Benchmark Transitions is pleased to announce the celebration of its 21st Anniversary!
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Learning & Mind & Brain
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Even in Education Everything Old is New Again

Even in Education Everything Old is New Again | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

It’s been over fifty years since the article “Teaching Machines” appeared in the Science Journal from which the opening quote was excerpted. Author B.F. Skinner would be pleased to read some of the headlines in the education sector this week, one in particular “College in a Box” (Kahn, 2014) which describes how textbook publishers such as Pearson have developed enhanced textbooks and put them on their online platforms such as MyMathLab. These enhanced ‘books’ feature interactive quizzes, tutorials, immediate feedback, and tutorial videos based upon students’ responses. Pearson’s new spin on the old textbook would likely meet Skinner’s definition of efficiency. Coincidently, the instructional method used for Pearson’s textbook programs is programmed instruction; a method Skinner developed and applied with his teaching machine. Skinner’s machine consisted of a program, developed to deliver a self-learning experience for the student that included presenting of content, related questions for students to answers, immediate  and corrective feedback.

 

 


Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Addiction, Treatment & Recovery
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FBI raids sober living condos in West Palm Beach

FBI raids sober living condos in West Palm Beach | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
FBI agents and state fraud police raided Good Decisions Sober Living on Georgia Avenue as part of an insurance fraud investigation.
Via George Curran
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Charles Davis's curator insight, September 14, 3:09 AM

�� BUSTED!

New Beginning's curator insight, September 14, 11:34 AM

OMG!  3 TO 4 DRUG TESTS A WEEK PER CLIENT BILLED AT $1500 PER TEST!  WOW!  MAKING UPWARDS OF $40 MILLION PER YEAR FOR A SOBER HOUSE!  COME ON!  HOW MANY PEOPLE COULD HAVE REALLY BEEN HELPED WITH THOSE FUNDS THAT DID NOT GET ANY HELP?  THIS KIND OF ACTION NEEDS TO STOP AND BE PUT IN THE SPOTLIGHT!

 

REVKEV

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A Surprising New Study On How Video Games Impact Children

A Surprising New Study On How Video Games Impact Children | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Parents tend to approach video games like junk food: games are fine in moderation but ultimately they are an evil temptation that’s more bad than good.

Via Kent Kessler
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The disease of perfectionism - Veronica Valli

The disease of perfectionism - Veronica Valli | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
This blog could be written really briefly, here's the gist of it: You're not perfect. Get over it. If only it were that simple right? Unfortunately the diseas
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Eating Disorders in the News
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When an Eating Disorder Takes Your Child Hostage - Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders

By Deborah A. Russo, PsyD., The Rosewood Centers for Eating Disorders Director, The Rosewood Institute I will be fine Mom, I need to start school, and I can’t miss it! I will fall behind and never catch up and then it will be awful… I won’t get the scholarship I’m depending on. Please, please, I …

Via Maisen Mosley
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Children's Minds
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Four in 10 infants lack strong parental attachments

Four in 10 infants lack strong parental attachments | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
In a study of 14,000 US children, 40 percent lack strong emotional bonds -- what psychologists call 'secure attachment' -- with their parents that are crucial to success later in life, according to a new report. The researchers found that these children are more likely to face educational and behavioral problems.

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Pimps use social media to lure at-risk teens into prostitution

Pimps use social media to lure at-risk teens into prostitution | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Parents should be alert to the fact pimps in Texas use social media to recruit young girls, with the likelihood it's happening elsewhere.
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Reversing the Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic

Reversing the Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
This is a deeply troubling and challenging public health problem that is an enormous priority for our Department and President Obama. What gives us hope is the knowledge that we have the power to bring an end to this epidemic. These deaths are preven...
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7 Ways to Break Your Kid: Disney Villian-Style

7 Ways to Break Your Kid: Disney Villian-Style | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The villain in Disney's Tangled is a parent...sort of.  Mother Gothel, as we know her, receives her designation as a mother when she kidnaps a young child and raises her under the guise of being he...
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Teacher Learning Networks
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Why Art Teachers are The Most Important Teachers in the School

Why Art Teachers are The Most Important Teachers in the School | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
I know that I'll be sparking quite a bit of controversy in this post, but I feel that in light of recent budget cuts and a general misunderstanding about

Via Linda Alexander
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Teacher Learning Networks
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The Learning Myth: Why I'm Cautious About Telling My Son He's Smart

The Learning Myth: Why I'm Cautious About Telling My Son He's Smart | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
By: Salman Khan
Researchers have known for some time that the brain is like a muscle; that the more you use it, the more it grows. They’ve found that neural connections form and deepen most when we make mistakes doing difficult tasks rather than repeatedly having success with easy ones. What this means is that our intelligence is not fixed, and the best way that we can grow our intelligence is to embrace tasks where we might struggle and fail.

My 5-year-­old son has just started reading. Every night, we lie on his bed and he reads a short book to me. Inevitably, he’ll hit a word

Via Linda Alexander
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Linda Alexander's curator insight, August 25, 4:05 PM

Well, I've already messed up by telling my children they're smart...too late to change that!  I have intuitively understood, however, that the brain is a muscle and that IQ/intelligence is not fixed.  So, I get 1 point for that!

Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from eParenting and Parenting in the 21st Century
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Presumed dangers of technology related play for children exaggerated by media

Presumed dangers of technology related play for children exaggerated by media | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

The seven week course ‘Exploring Play’ is set to provide students with an exploration of the debates surrounding play, including the invention of digital and technology based play which has been highly reported on in the media as damaging for children.

The course is set to dismiss this belief and reveal active and imaginary play is still a popular aspect of children’s lives as they grow up with continuing importance into adulthood.


Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from There's nothing so black as the inferno of human mind...
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Schizophrenia is eight different diseases, not one

Schizophrenia is eight different diseases, not one | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
New research shows that schizophrenia is not a single disease, but a group of eight distinct disorders, each caused by changes in clusters of genes that lead to different sets of symptoms.

Via Agãpe Lenõre
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from The Addictions Coaches Corner
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13 Valuable Alternative Treatments for Addiction | The Fix

13 Valuable Alternative Treatments for Addiction | The Fix | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The Fix lists some outside-the-box modalities that are playing increasingly important roles in substance abuse treatment.

Via Maisen Mosley, Cali Estes
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Effects of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign on youths

Could the US government's biggest ever attempt to use the media to turn US youth away from cannabis actually have done the reverse? At best it was a disappointment; at worst, it counterproductively fostered the impression that 'Everyone's doing it'.


Via George Curran
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Did the Federal Government  anti-drug campaign backfire?  -Lon

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Exposure to Alcohol Before Birth Linked to Social Skills Problems in Childhood

Exposure to Alcohol Before Birth Linked to Social Skills Problems in Childhood | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) provides education, information, help and hope to the public. It advocates prevention, intervention and treatment through offices in New York and Washington, and a nationwide
network of Affiliates.
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Obesity, sleep loss associated with teens’ excessive ‘screen-time’, CDC says

Obesity, sleep loss associated with teens’ excessive ‘screen-time’, CDC says | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
New CDC survey shows that nearly three-quarters of American teens age 12 to 15 are using media excessively. More than two hours of screen use a day has been linked to teen obesity, CDC says.
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Helping the “Bad Kid” of the Family

Helping the “Bad Kid” of the Family | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
How to help your child break out of the “Troublemaker” role
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Cyberbullying, it's not a game! It's your Life!!!
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Cyberbullying increases in line with mobile phone usage? [infographic]

Cyberbullying increases in line with mobile phone usage? [infographic] | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Summary: Research on cyberbullying sponsored by Opennet has found that teenager who are 'heavy cell phone users' are more likely to engage in the practice of bullying online, as well as become bullied themselves.According to the survey, mobile...

 

Read more:

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/igeneration/cyberbullying-increases-in-line-with-mobile-phone-usage-infographic/14713

 


Via Gust MEES
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KIP Somerset's curator insight, August 16, 2013 6:17 AM

Correlation between mobile phone use and cyberbullying is explored in this info graphic. This would make a great conversation starter. Plenty of other statistics in this info graphic to reflect on.

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Man guilty in battery case - The News Desk

Man guilty in  battery case - The News Desk | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

A former program director at a Christian boarding school for troubled teens in Caroline County has been convicted of sexual battery.

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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from eParenting and Parenting in the 21st Century
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Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all? | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Summer is expiring, the mornings already feel shorter and now, for families across the country, it's that dark time of year when we reacquaint ourselves with our alarm clocks and – whisper it – go back to school (although children in Scotland went back two weeks ago).

Via Peter Mellow
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Toward a Luddite Pedagogy-a View That Progress Is More Than Just a Lot of New Gadgets

Toward a Luddite Pedagogy-a View That Progress Is More Than Just a Lot of New Gadgets | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The time has come to take a stand against this thoughtless use of “Luddite” in the pejorative. The historical record needs to be set straight, and it needs to be set straight as a prelude to defending a Luddite approach to education.

 

A Luddite pedagogy for the 21st century

Just as the 19th century Luddism was interested far more in a forward-looking political agenda than in particular pieces of technology, so a 21st century Luddism in  education will be concerned with more important issues than whether or not allowing pupils to use their own devices in class is a good idea. Like their political ancestors, the Luddite pedagogues will wield a hammer, but they won’t see any urgency in bringing it down on trivial things like touch-screen gadgetry. Instead, the targets lie elsewhere.

 

One place they lie is in the false talk of liberation that has gained popularity among people using the #edtech hashtag. A Luddite pedagogy is a pedagogy of liberation, and, as such, it clashes head on with the talk of liberation peddled by advocates of edtech. According to the latter, the child, previously condemned to all the unbearably oppressive restrictions of having to learn in groups, can now be liberated by the tech that makes a 1:1 model of education feasible, launching each and every child on an utterly personal learning journey. Liberation as personalisation – here the Luddite finds something that ought to be smashed.

 

But what needs to be smashed is less the pedagogy itself than the idea of freedom it rests on – the more general political notion that freedom is all about freeing individuals from social constraints so that they can pursue their personal projects unhampered by the claims of society. This is the essentially liberal idea championed by Sir Ken Robinson, for instance, for whom it is enough for individuals to find things to do that they enjoy and that allow them to develop a talent.

 

But we need to be clear here: Luddism doesn’t want to smash the concern for personal freedom, rather it wants to smash the idea that it is enough. The untruth of personalisation is its unjustified narrowing of the horizon of liberation.


Via Hybrid Pedagogy, Miloš Bajčetić
Lon Woodbury's insight:

"Luddites" have been seen as against progress.  This article argues that they claimed there are more important ways to progress than just new electronic gadgets and scientific advances. -Lon 

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How Negative Thoughts Are Ruining Your Life

Last year, a study of more than 30,000 people revealed that harping on negative life events (particularly through rumination and self-blame) can be the prime predictor of some of today's most common mental health problems. Results from the eye-opening U.K. study, the largest of its kind, indicated that it isn't just what happens to us that matters, but how we think about it that shapes our psychological well-being.

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9th International Conference - Sydney, Australia, December 2-4, 2014 | EAGALA Primary site

9th International Conference - Sydney, Australia, December 2-4, 2014 | EAGALA Primary site | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

We look forward to seeing you at EAGALA's 9th International Conference in Sydney, Australia, December 2-4, 2014!

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