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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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The Economist:New research on how to close the achievement gap

The Economist:New research on how to close the achievement gap | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character. By Paul Tough. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 256 pages; $27. Random House; £12.99. Buy from...

Via Lou Salza
Lon Woodbury's insight:

This is examining the issues the early therapeutic (emotional growth) boarding schools were based on in the 1980s, many of which are still operating.  -Lon

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Lou Salza's curator insight, January 31, 2013 12:08 AM

Paul Tough, a journalist and former editor at the New York Times Magazine, aims to answer these thorny questions in “How Children Succeed”, an ambitious and elegantly written new book, now out in Britain. The problem, he writes, is that academic success is believed to be a product of cognitive skills—the kind of intelligence that gets measured in IQ tests. This view has spawned a vibrant market for brain-building baby toys, and an education-reform movement that sweats over test scores. But new research from a spate of economists, psychologists, neuroscientists and educators has found that the skills that see a student through college and beyond have less to do with smarts than with more ordinary personality traits, like an ability to stay focused and control impulses. The KIPP students who graduated from college were not the academic stars but the workhorses, the ones who plugged away at problems and resolved to do better.

So non-cognitive skills like persistence and curiosity are highly predictive of future success. But where do these traits come from? And how can they be developed? In search of answers, Mr Tough first looks at the problem on a neurological level. Apparently medical reasons explain why children who grow up in abusive or dysfunctional environments generally find it harder to concentrate, sit still and rebound from disappointments. The part of the brain most affected by early stress is the prefrontal cortex, which is critical for regulating thoughts and mediating behaviour. When this region is damaged—a common condition for children living amid the pressures of poverty—it is tougher to suppress unproductive instincts.

 
Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens
News and Opinion of Interest to Parents and Professionals Working with With Struggling Young People - Web Page www.strugglingteens.com
Curated by Lon Woodbury
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Woodbury Reports Places For Struggling Teens - News and Views

Woodbury Reports Places For Struggling Teens - News and Views | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

This is a supplemental publication of Woodbury Reports' Places for Struggling Teens, www.strugglingteens.com.  We search the Internet to find articles and opinions that might be helpful to professionals in the private parent-choice network, and parents working with teens with behavioral/emotional/learning problems.

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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Learning & Mind & Brain
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A School With No Teachers, Where Students Teach Themselves

A School With No Teachers, Where Students Teach Themselves | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The school, simply named 42, requires no high school diploma and no money to apply. It's turning French education on its head, but it may also solve some of the country's most pressing problems.

Via Juergen Wagner, Miloš Bajčetić
Lon Woodbury's insight:

This concept reminds me a little of US education before mass education, of online learning potentials currently and some of the progressive schools going back to the 1930s. -Lon

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Historic Shift Occurring in Opiate vs. Alcoholism Stats

12/17/2014 -ATIN - In a major development, data out of Ohio is showing for the first time in many decades that statistically addiction to opiates is near to outstripping addiction to alcohol. 
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Anderson Cooper investigates Mindfulness for 60 Minutes

Anderson Cooper investigates Mindfulness for 60 Minutes | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Anderson Cooper reports on what it's like to try to achieve "mindfulness," a self-awareness scientists say is very healthy, but rarely achieved in today's world of digital distractions
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Mindfulness is going mainstream this last year or two, but many people I work with in therapeutic or emotional growth programs have been doing this for years in helping their struggling teen students. -Lon

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Religion or spirituality has positive impact on romantic/marital relationships, child development, research shows

Adolescents who attend religious services with one or both of their parents are more likely to feel greater well-being while romantic partners who pray for their “significant others” experience greater relationship commitment, according to research.
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Community-based program for troubled teens halves crime rates | UNSW Newsroom

Community-based program for troubled teens halves crime rates | UNSW Newsroom | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

An innovative community based program aimed at engaging and upskilling troubled teenagers has halved juvenile crime rates in Armidale NSW over a seven year period, new research from UNSW, University of New England and the Hunter Medical Research Institute has shown. 

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Top Ten Relaxation Techniques for Children

Top Ten Relaxation Techniques for Children | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Includes: ten great ways to help children relax, and practice these techniques together.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 11, 10:10 PM

These are mindfulness practices and very important for children and adults.

 

ehd1@shaw.ca

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Feeling Judgy? Take Home Some Lessons from the Parking Lot at Trader Joe's

Feeling Judgy? Take Home Some Lessons from the Parking Lot at Trader Joe's | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
A dear friend of mine (we'll call her Lizzy) is the single mom of two daughters. Lizzy spends her days working at our school, and her evenings and weekends engaged in activities aimed at enriching ...

Via Gina Stepp
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Those who judge parents rarely know what they are judging.  Every parent can remember times when they are dealing with a crisis from a child and strangers disapprove.  It seems to be a national tendency, especially from people who have never been a parent.  . -Lon

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Gina Stepp's curator insight, December 11, 3:45 PM

Have you ever been on the receiving end of a "parking-lot judgment"? Have you ever been on the bestowing end? Maybe you've experienced both. In either case . . . tell us your story, we're bound to learn something.

Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Empathy and Compassion
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When the Narcissist Becomes Dangerous

When the Narcissist Becomes Dangerous | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
here are four characteristics of the narcissist which can work together to make him a danger. They are:

  • The need to protect his inflated sense of self can make him desperate.
  • The need to feed his sense of specialness can drive him to violate others’ boundaries.
  • Lack of empathy for others can make him incapable of seeing when he hurts others.
  • His belief that he is special can make it easy for him to rationalize his actions.


....If you have a narcissist in your life: a parent, sibling, friend, spouse, or ex, it is possible to manage the relationship in a healthy way. Your best approach is to walk a figurative tightrope. Have empathy for the pool of pain that lies beneath the surface of your narcissist’s blustery shell. Understand that he or she is protecting herself from the hurt that she experienced in childhood. But at the same time, it is vital to protect yourself as well. Keep your boundaries intact.


Do not let your compassion make you vulnerable.


Via Edwin Rutsch
Lon Woodbury's insight:

He's right, dealing with them is a tightrope.  It sometimes calls for supreme self-control. -Lon

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For docs, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients

For docs, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Give therapists and psychiatrists information about the biology of a mental disorder, and they have less — not more — empathy for the patient, a new Yale study shows.

The findings, released Dec. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, challenge the notion that biological explanations for mental illness boost compassion for the tens of millions of Americans who suffer from mental-health problems.  

Conventional wisdom suggests that biological explanations for psychiatric symptoms should reduce the blame patients receive for their behavior by making genes and brain cells the culprits. This, in turn, should increase feelings of compassion.

In a series of studies, U.S. clinicians read descriptions of patients whose symptoms were explained using information that focused on either genetics and neurobiology or on childhood experiences and stressful life circumstances. Among other questions, the clinicians were asked how much compassion they felt for the individual, an essential element of therapy.

The clinicians consistently expressed less empathy and compassion for the patient when his or her symptoms were explained using biological factors, the researchers found.


By Bill Hathaway


Via Edwin Rutsch
Lon Woodbury's insight:

This won't be good news for Psychiatrists who emphasize treatment by medication. -Lon

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, December 5, 10:00 AM

Surprising results...

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Owner of Christian Academy closes school amid security questions, abuse convictions

Owner of Christian Academy closes school amid security questions, abuse convictions | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Several episodes of violent beatings were caught on camera.
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No, you're not sleeping enough, and it's a problem: 15 scary facts in new ... - Washington Post (blog)

No, you're not sleeping enough, and it's a problem: 15 scary facts in new ... - Washington Post (blog) | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
"Every aspect of who you are as a human -- every capability is degraded, impaired, when you lose sleep."

Via ESCAP Online
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Maybe I should take a nap this afternoon? :) -Lon

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He is VERY Disrespectful to me! -

He is VERY Disrespectful to me! - | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Do you have a teen who is being disrespectful? If so, find out how to deal with it and what should change. Click here and share!

Via Teenage Sons
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from High Performance Learning
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What I Know About Kids...

So I was speaking with a young, prospective teacher the other day about his future in education, and at the end of our conversation he asked me a really good question…a question that I had to stop ...

Via Adrian Bertolini
Lon Woodbury's insight:

A good view on children.  I'm thinking of a few teens I'm doing a little work with currently, and have been amazed at how much all those points have been shut down, at least in their relations with me in this specific situation. -Lon

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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, December 21, 8:46 PM

Great summarising blog post covering what the author knows about kids. Great reading!

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Anger and Anorexia

Anger and Anorexia | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
It took an eating disorder to finally teach me how to get angry.
Many people with eating disorders are like me in that they feel reluctant — even downright refuse — to express anger. This is by and large a learned behavior.
I grew up in a...

Via Maisen Mosley
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Good insight as to when angry might be a positive emotion. -Lon

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MyHealthShare's curator insight, December 21, 9:34 AM
It took an eating disorder to finally teach me how to get angry. http://flip.it/NnU4c @EDCDenver #Anger #Anorexia
Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Educational Books and Scholarly Articles
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Why Curiosity Enhances Learning

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

A neurological study has shown that curiosity makes our brains more receptive for learning, and that as we learn, we enjoy the sensation of learning.


Via ICTPHMS
Lon Woodbury's insight:

When a child drives you crazy with "Why?", I guess that is a good thing. :)  -Lon

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Dr. Pyrate's curator insight, December 18, 10:47 AM

Remember: A child's 1st question is "What?" because they need language-object identification. THEN it's "Why?" Don't close down either. Ever.

Christine Macia Carter's curator insight, December 18, 1:41 PM

Curiosity!!!  Key to everything.

maria taveras's curator insight, December 18, 1:57 PM

It's a natural human phenomenon that occurs when our curiosity is activate and engaged learning and assimilation takes place. It's a creative dynamic that is essential to foster for our well being.

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No One Brings Dinner When Your Daughter Is an Addict

No One Brings Dinner When Your Daughter Is an Addict | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
When my wife was diagnosed with breast cancer, we ate well. Mary Beth and I had both read the terrifying pathology report of a tumor the size of an olive. The surgical digging for lymph nodes was followed by months of radiation. We ate very well. Friends drove Mary Beth...
Lon Woodbury's insight:

The contrast between friends reacting to physical and then mental health emergencies is very well done. -Lon

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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Education Policy & Practice
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How ‘Deprogramming’ Kids From How to ‘Do School’ Could Improve Learning

How ‘Deprogramming’ Kids From How to ‘Do School’ Could Improve Learning | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Student know how to play school like it's a game, but if teachers change the rules, they just might appreciate it.

Via Christopher Tienken
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Why Your Child Hates School

Why Your Child Hates School | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
By Miso N. Grey A version of this article was originally published at Diary of an Angry Father. My son is 12 years-old and is heading into the 7th gra...
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Why Kids Won't Quit Technology

Why Kids Won't Quit Technology | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

"Smartphones, iPads, TVs, computers, videogames. Technology is omnipresent, especially for young students. They just can’t get enough; one 2013 study found that college students check their digital devices for non-class purposes 11 times per day on average, and 80 percent of them admitted that the technology was distracting them from class. This has some educators and scientists concerned: Are students distracted because their brains are hard-wired for it after a lifetime of screens? Is there a cultural or behavioral element to the fixation that has infiltrated the classroom?"


Via EDTC@UTB
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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, December 11, 8:36 PM

The premise seems to be that educators are incorporating technology as a defensive strategy to combat distraction. Interesting. I have to wonder if distraction is always "bad." I also wonder if one of the reasons students gravitate towards their devices is because they have them. . .rather than doodle in their notebooks and write notes to their friends or find other ways to manage their "distractions" which are often responses to battling boredom. Why write a whole note that could be collected by the teacher when you can text? But maybe we shouldn't assume that student distraction (read "not paying attention to what the teacher is saying") equals a lack of engagement. Maybe it's curiosity.

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, December 12, 2:08 AM

Although the "jury is still out" on whether students' apparent "addiction" to digital devices impede concentration and performance in a structured classroom environment, some teachers  are finding the iPad, smart phones, and tablets used by students can be help accelerate the teaching of science, technology, and math--subjects that fall under the STEM banner.  Whether these digital devices "hardwire" the brain is still a debatable subject.  Meanwhile, teachers are learning to use these devices as a supportive educational tool. Aloha, Russ.

Digitpedia's curator insight, December 14, 6:31 AM

Very interesting.

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Is the Addicts' "Hole in the Soul" caused by Insecure Attachment?

Is the Addicts' "Hole in the Soul" caused by Insecure Attachment? | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Dr. Flores reports that the human need for social interaction is a physiological one, linked to the well-being of the nervous system, as we’ve already seen. When someone becomes addicted, he says, mechanisms for healthy attachment are “hijacked,” resulting in dependence on addictive substances or behaviors. Flores believes that addicts, even before their addiction kicks in, struggle with knowing how to form emotional bonds to connect to other people.

While it’s commonly understood that early childhood attachments to parents and family are necessary for healthy development, Flores says, emotional attachments remain necessary throughout adulthood. It’s not enough, he says, to “just stop drinking. ” To achieve long-term well-being, addicts need opportunities to forge healthy emotional attachments.

Flores reports that this is the reason for the phenomenal success rate of Alcoholics Anonymous over more than 50 years.  When people walk into an A.A. meeting, the whole point is to admit openly that they are an alcoholic and yet to feel fully accepted for exactly who they are, with no condemnation.  What a relief! This experience of, in essence, pure attachment, may be the best attachment experience in their lives – and most people who walk in and experience this, miraculously, stay sober for decades or a lifetime.

Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Pacific Quest-HI Welcomes Kellyn Smythe

Pacific Quest-HI Welcomes Kellyn Smythe | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Pacific Quest Welcomes Kellyn Smythe to the Admissions and Outreach Team. Kellyn comes to Pacific Quest with extensive experience working with families and professionals in the field of special needs education.
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Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Still Read Fiction - they tend to be more empathetic toward others

Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Still Read Fiction - they tend to be more empathetic toward others | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

This is further apparent in a 2013 study that investigated emotional transportation, which is how sensitive people are to others' feelings. Researchers calculated emotional transportation by having participants express how a story they read affected them emotionally on a five-point scale — for example, how the main character's success made them feel, and how sorry they felt for the characters. 


In the study, empathy was only apparent in the groups of people who read fiction and who were emotionally transported. Meanwhile, those who were not transported demonstrated a decrease in empathy


By Gabe Bergado 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, December 6, 1:28 AM

Fascinating article from Gabe Bergado.  According to a study conducted by Emory University, people who read fiction tend to be more empathetic toward others.  Fiction stimulates centers of the brain involved with language, role playing, and self awareness.  The study also showed that "Fiction readers make great friends as they tend to be more aware of others."  So, pick up a book and become more human.  Aloha, Russ.

Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from ESCAP child and adolescent psychiatry
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Forgotten Children (Research on impact of institutionalization at young age)

Forgotten Children (Research on impact of institutionalization at young age) | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), the first-ever randomized trial of foster care for young children with a history of institutionalization, began in 2000.

Via ESCAP Online
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Do we let "school" get in the way of learning?

Do we let "school" get in the way of learning? | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
I had some great conversations today in Queensland, Australia about some of the ways we need to change our mindsets about teaching and learning.  A big one that I kept reiterating was how we hold o...

Via Adrian Bertolini, Teenage Sons
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 2, 7:35 PM

This is directed at principals which is all well and fine, but should we not let teaching be included in this conversation. However, many principals, School managers, fled the classroom, did not want to be there in the first place, and spent little time teaching so what should that tell us. We are led down the path that Habermas described and deform the life world and life work of teachers. Everything can be planned.

 

@ivon_ehd1

David W. Deeds's curator insight, December 3, 7:57 AM

Yes, "we" do. ;)

Dennis Swender's curator insight, December 3, 12:15 PM

A principal for whom to need to work

Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from With My Right Brain
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Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General

Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The fascinating effect of music on people’s cognitive abilities.

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.

Their brains are also capable of much faster neural responses in key areas of the brain related to decision-making, memory and attention.

The results were presented at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, DC (Schaeffer et al., 2014).

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.


Via Alessandro Cerboni, Emre Erdogan
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Duy Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 10:47 PM

Music is a brain treat