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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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The Economist:New research on how to close the achievement gap

The Economist:New research on how to close the achievement gap | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character. By Paul Tough. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 256 pages; $27. Random House; £12.99. Buy from...

Via Lou Salza
Lon Woodbury's insight:

This is examining the issues the early therapeutic (emotional growth) boarding schools were based on in the 1980s, many of which are still operating.  -Lon

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Lou Salza's curator insight, January 31, 2013 12:08 AM

Paul Tough, a journalist and former editor at the New York Times Magazine, aims to answer these thorny questions in “How Children Succeed”, an ambitious and elegantly written new book, now out in Britain. The problem, he writes, is that academic success is believed to be a product of cognitive skills—the kind of intelligence that gets measured in IQ tests. This view has spawned a vibrant market for brain-building baby toys, and an education-reform movement that sweats over test scores. But new research from a spate of economists, psychologists, neuroscientists and educators has found that the skills that see a student through college and beyond have less to do with smarts than with more ordinary personality traits, like an ability to stay focused and control impulses. The KIPP students who graduated from college were not the academic stars but the workhorses, the ones who plugged away at problems and resolved to do better.

So non-cognitive skills like persistence and curiosity are highly predictive of future success. But where do these traits come from? And how can they be developed? In search of answers, Mr Tough first looks at the problem on a neurological level. Apparently medical reasons explain why children who grow up in abusive or dysfunctional environments generally find it harder to concentrate, sit still and rebound from disappointments. The part of the brain most affected by early stress is the prefrontal cortex, which is critical for regulating thoughts and mediating behaviour. When this region is damaged—a common condition for children living amid the pressures of poverty—it is tougher to suppress unproductive instincts.

 
Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens
News and Opinion of Interest to Parents and Professionals Working with With Struggling Young People - Web Page www.strugglingteens.com
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Woodbury Reports Places For Struggling Teens - News and Views

Woodbury Reports Places For Struggling Teens - News and Views | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

This is a supplemental publication of Woodbury Reports' Places for Struggling Teens, www.strugglingteens.com.  We search the Internet to find articles and opinions that might be helpful to professionals in the private parent-choice network, and parents working with teens with behavioral/emotional/learning problems.

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Simple Kids' Play vs. Genuine Bullying: Here's How to Tell - Voices of Experience

Simple Kids' Play vs. Genuine Bullying: Here's How to Tell - Voices of Experience | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Parents who educate themselves about bullying are better prepared to help their kids, whether they're the bully or the bullied.
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Is internet addiction real?

Is internet addiction real? | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
The stories are numerous, yet extreme, and thus widely covered. You’ve probably heard at least a few. In South Korea, one couple was so committed to their virtual baby that their actual 3-month-old died in her crib, malnourished,...

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Penrith Farms's curator insight, January 28, 2:56 PM

In depth, scary article.  Blogged about it earlier.

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Why the modern world is bad for your brain

Why the modern world is bad for your brain | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Multitasking is an essential skill in the era of email, text messages, Facebook and Twitter. But, argues neuroscientist Daniel J Levitin, it’s actually making us less efficient

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John Page's curator insight, January 25, 7:44 PM

This article speaks exactly about the title. It talks about how all of the things going on in the modern world is too much for our minds to handle because they are so busy. All of this multitasking produces stress which is not good for your body or your health. We have become robots that must check our phones or we will not be able to function, it talks about how if there is an email in the unread bin then our IQ goes down by up to 10 points. Media is very important in this because it will spread this and let people become aware of what we are doing to our brain.

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This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED

This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

“Action video games have a number of ingredients that are actually really powerful for brain plasticity, learning, attention, and vision,” says brain scientist Daphne Bavelier in her TED Talk on the subject.

Findings like Bavelier’s have been cropping up over the last few years, forcing us to reevaluate our firmly held beliefs. Many educators now use video games in formal learning settings, and others are teaming up with members of the gaming industry to design programs that target specific learning goals. The controversy is ebbing, and this year neuroscientists have discovered something that may end the discussion once and for all:

Video games actually make the brain bigger.


Via Kim Flintoff
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Millennials Reflect on Social Networking

Millennials Reflect on Social Networking | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Teens are taking notice of how social networking is impacting their relationships for good and bad. Most agree it is a useful tool to keep in touch with friends and family and to communicate important and timely messages. But they also share a deep concern for how social media affects the quality of their relationships.
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Counseling isn’t Working with Addiction | Penrith Farms-WA

For the past decade the Federal Government has been encouraging doctors to push people they assess as having an alcohol or substance abuse problem towards counseling.  It is turning out that this counseling is only effective with reducing alcohol abuse but abuse of marijuana, opioids, and cocaine is not effected. 


Via Penrith Farms
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Maybe the focus of the counseling has been toward the substance use, rather than the underlying emotional causes? -Lon

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Penrith Farms's curator insight, January 23, 4:27 PM

Recent blog entry from Penrith Farms

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Unexpected Tools That are Influencing the Future of Education

Unexpected Tools That are Influencing the Future of Education | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

Unschooling, greater independence for the student and teacher, and getting in touch with our social and emotional selves are just some of the topics that have inspired educators and life-long learners...


Via Becky Roehrs
Lon Woodbury's insight:

I like the context of comparing "Interconnected individuals" vs. "consumers". -Lon

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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, January 22, 10:52 AM

Lots of ways to learn-from schools that are student-led, schools that focus on mindfulness,  to schools using brain-based teaching and learning techniques.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, January 22, 3:05 PM

We're in the midst of exciting and life-changing possibilities for the education industry.

Learning Help Center's curator insight, January 23, 3:25 AM

Freedom of thought has lead us to some of the greatest genuineness.

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This Is How Music Can Change Your Brain

This Is How Music Can Change Your Brain | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Actively learning to play an instrument can help a child's academic achievement

 

Summary from BrainHQ December 2014

A new study from Northwestern University has found that kids who actively learn to play musical instruments may be training their brains to process sounds better. But the research showed that a key feature is active participation in learning music—and that passive participation doesn’t seem to confer the same benefits. 


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What Motivates Teachers? - Mind/Shift

What Motivates Teachers? - Mind/Shift | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

"A recent Gallup poll of 170,000 Americans — 10,000 of whom were teachers — found that teaching is the second most satisfying profession (after medicine). Ironically, the same Gallup poll found that in contrast to their overall happiness with their jobs, teachers often rate last or close to the bottom for workplace engagement and happiness.

“Of all the professions we studied in the U.S., teachers are the least likely to say that their opinions count and the least likely to say that their supervisor creates an open and sharing environment,” said Brandon Busteed, executive director of Gallup Education, at the Next New World Conference.

This is a troubling trend at a time when schools need to continue to attract high quality educators. “If the perception in our country is that teaching is not a great profession to go into, we certainly aren’t going to be encouraging really talented young people to be thinking about the profession of teaching,” Busteed said in an interview with Stephen Smith on the American RadioWorks podcast."


Via John Evans, Miloš Bajčetić
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Most of the ex-classroom teachers I know (including myself) say what they miss most from their teaching experience are the kids.  Even and sometimes especially those that are challenging. -Lon 

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Biological explanations, less empathy

Biological explanations, less empathy | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Biological explanations of mental illness reduce clinicians’ empathy for their patients, according to a new Yale study.

U.S. physicians were given a series of fictitious patients with various mental illnesses that were explained using either biological or psychosocial reasons. Doctors exhibited less empathy after reading the biological explanations. Furthermore, clinicians believed medication, not psychotherapy, to be a more effective treatment when symptoms were explained biologically.


The finding comes at a time when there has been a shift to conceptualizing psychiatric disorders as biomedical diseases, according to lead author and psychology graduate student Matthew Lebowitz GRD ’16.


There is no doubt that advances in genetics and neuroscience have revolutionized how we see mental health, he added, but it is important to understand their pitfalls, too. 


BY ERIN WANG


Via Edwin Rutsch
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How Handwriting Enhances Learning Infographic

How Handwriting Enhances Learning Infographic | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

How Handwriting Enhances Learning Infographic Nowadays it’s less about putting pen to paper and more about turning on your laptop. But are we losing out by letting the art of penmanship die? Lots of evidence shows handwriting for kids stimulates the brain and offers benefits typing doesn’t. The H... http://elearninginfographics.com/handwriting-enhances-learning-infographic/


Via elearninginfographic, Suvi Salo
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The mass attention deficit era: what businesses can learn from schools

The mass attention deficit era: what businesses can learn from schools | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
We are living through the first era of mass attention deficit.

You’ll recognise it if, like me, you struggle to read a book from start to finish, or if you start a task only to end up following a maze of different weblinks instead. And you’ll understand it if you have friends who just can’t put their phones down: on average, we check them 150 days a day, according to Nokia research.

It would be tempting to say this is just a millennial phenomenon; that a generation of self-centered 20- and 30-somethings is getting sucked into the screen. But, if you thought this group is bad, just look to the next generation.


The brain is changing

Kids aged eight to 18 spend twice as much time with screens as they spend in school. Children have fundamentally different cognitive skills nowadays and they are too easily distracted, according to two pieces of research by the Pew Internet Project, in which US teachers said kids need more time away from digital technologies. In the UK, shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt has suggested children receive lessons in concentration – an ironic proposition, to be sure.

But fighting modern modalities is not the best way to fit the reality of consumption and comprehension today. If brains are evolving to favour constant, short bursts of information, it is unlikely this can be reversed. Even in 1976 a study found that in-lesson concentration ebbed and flowed, topping out at just 10 to 18 minutes.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Lon Woodbury's insight:

This is the reason I try to limit stories on my online newsletter to 500 words, and the reason I'm shifting from 50 minute segments on internet talk radio to less than 10 minute interviews.  -Lon

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 16, 8:13 PM

Are we saying this is good change? What if paid attention to the changes that are happening, not to control them, but to experience them more fully.

 

I am not sure School, the way it is structured, has much to offer.

@ivon_ehd1

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The American Teenager in 2015

The American Teenager in 2015 | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
In 1965, we surveyed the nation’s teens. 50 years later, we take a new look

Via Peter Mellow
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Penrith Farms's curator insight, Today, 6:46 PM

Interesting comparison between teenagers today and teenagers fifty years ago.  I think it says more about American society than it does about the kids themselves.

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Helicopter Parenting: Good For Your Pets, Bad For Your Kids

Helicopter Parenting: Good For Your Pets, Bad For Your Kids | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

                   "Helicopter the one on the left, not the right."

 

"If you want to make your children neurotic, clinginess and overprotectiveness on your part - helicopter parenting - is the way to go.

"Assuming you don't want to cause that, it is still okay to hover over your dogs and cats, according to an analysis of pet owners by psychologists at U.C. Berkeley and California State University, East Bay.

"They used an online survey of more than 1,000 pet owners nationwide to analyze the key personality traits and nurturing styles of people who identified as a "cat person," a "dog person," "both" or "neither."  Those who expressed the greatest affection for their pets were also the most conscientious and neurotic, suggesting that the qualities that work for domesticated canine and feline companions, who tend to require lifelong parenting, make for overbearing parents."

 

Summary from BrainHQ Brain Fitness News: January 2015

Neurotic People Make the Best Pet Owners 
Psychologists at UC Berkeley and Cal State East Bay recently conducted a study of pet owners, and found that those who had the most “neurotic” tendencies were also the most conscientious when it came to their pets’ happiness and well-being. They suggest that if your tendency is to be a “helicopter parent,” it will work out much better for your pets than for your (human) children.


Via iPamba
Lon Woodbury's insight:

Could the helicopter parents trend be coming from an increasing tendency in our society for some adults to have pets instead of children, and parents tending more to consider pets a part of the family? -Lon

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America's addiction to Heroin contributing to terrorism | Kenneth Whitfield | LinkedIn

America's addiction to Heroin contributing to terrorism | Kenneth Whitfield | LinkedIn | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

The picture shown is of a Afghan National Police officer after a raid on a stash house full of Opium used to make Heroin. Today the war on drugs is not just about the eradication of the sales of illicit narcotics in America. Now this war has been complicated by the ones that profit from it the most, terrorist. 

Lon Woodbury's insight:

This is an entirely different slant on the War on Drugs - the one that I think is not working. -Lon

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Huffington Post Live - Free-Range Parenting vs. Helicopter Parenting

Huffington Post Live - Free-Range Parenting vs. Helicopter Parenting | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Free Range Parenting vs. Helicopter Parenting. What's best for the kids?
Lon Woodbury's insight:

In my work with students enrolled in therapeutic boarding schools and wilderness therapy programs, I have seen far more damage needing residential treatment from over-controlling parents than I have from neglectful or abusive parents. -Lon

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Disadvantages of Social Networking: Surprising Insights from Teens

Disadvantages of Social Networking: Surprising Insights from Teens | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD. Drawn from a collection of 10th grade essays, this article explores the disadvantages of social networking.
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What Sends Teens Toward Triumph Or Tribulation

What Sends Teens Toward Triumph Or Tribulation | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Alison Gopnik on Laurence Steinberg’s “Age of Opportunity” and on what sends teens toward triumph or tribulation.
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Teen opinion: how bleak should dystopian fiction be?

Teen opinion: how bleak should dystopian fiction be? | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses have become an increasing issue for young people in today’s society and many of these aspects are reflected in YA dystopian fiction.

Via Penrith Farms
Lon Woodbury's insight:

I like to read, and lately I've got into YA dystopian fiction.  I'm inclined to see the positive side the author talks about, a youth showing character, perseverance, morality and goal oriented and through those usually overcoming all obstacles in the end.,  Looking at past generations, there were the Tom Swift and Tom Swift Jr. series, and the Hardy boys series, and the Nancy Drew series.  All lived in worlds with threats, bad people, and overwhelming odds.  They were seen as aiding character development, much like I think the modern dystopian fiction can be, especially YA Dystopian fiction.  I've heard parents talk to young people about "What would Harry Potter do?" etc.  Modern YA Dystopian fiction I think is similar, just written for a different time. -Lon


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Penrith Farms's curator insight, January 23, 2:03 PM

A little lighter reading this afternoon.  Speaks to the impact dystopian literature has on teenagers written from a teenagers perspective.

Penrith Farms's comment, January 23, 7:14 PM
Since you said Harry Potter ... http://www.themarysue.com/dealing-with-anxiety-psychology-lessons-from-harry-potter/
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Ritalin vs. Recess: Are Drugs Really the Answer to the ADHD Epidemic? - TakePart

Ritalin vs. Recess: Are Drugs Really the Answer to the ADHD Epidemic? - TakePart | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
By robbing kids of time to act like kids, then opting for medication over therapy, we may be undertaking a giant, uncontrolled experiment on the brains of children.

Via Penrith Farms
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Penrith Farms's curator insight, January 22, 5:21 PM

Great article.  Prescriptions for ADHD in the United States are double what they are in Europe.  No one knows what the long term effect these drugs will have on children.  Pharmaceutical companies are doing a strong sell (surprise surprise).  In the end brings it back to legislation requiring schools to focus on Reading, Writing, and Math with the loss of recess.  Aren't children supposed to play?  Take away play time what is going to happen?

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The Likely Cause of Addiction Has Been Discovered, and It Is Not What You Think

The Likely Cause of Addiction Has Been Discovered, and It Is Not What You Think | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it

"...The experiment is simple. Put a rat in a cage, alone, with two water bottles. One is just water. The other is water laced with heroin or cocaine. Almost every time you run this experiment, the rat will become obsessed with the drugged water, and keep coming back for more and more, until it kills itself.

The advert explains: "Only one drug is so addictive, nine out of ten laboratory rats will use it. And use it. And use it. Until dead. It's called cocaine. And it can do the same thing to you."

But in the 1970s, a Professor of Psychology in Vancouver called Bruce Alexander noticed something odd about this experiment. The rat is put in the cage all alone. It has nothing to do but take the drugs. What would happen, he wondered, if we tried this differently? So Professor Alexander built Rat Park. It is a lush cage where the rats would have colored balls and the best rat-food and tunnels to scamper down and plenty of friends: everything a rat about town could want. What, Alexander wanted to know, will happen then?

In Rat Park, all the rats obviously tried both water bottles, because they didn't know what was in them. But what happened next was startling.

The rats with good lives didn't like the drugged water. They mostly shunned it, consuming less than a quarter of the drugs the isolated rats used. None of them died. While all the rats who were alone and unhappy became heavy users, none of the rats who had a happy environment did.

[...] 

Professor Alexander argues this discovery is a profound challenge both to the right-wing view that addiction is a moral failing caused by too much hedonistic partying, and the liberal view that addiction is a disease taking place in a chemically hijacked brain. In fact, he argues, addiction is an adaptation. It's not you. It's your cage.

After the first phase of Rat Park, Professor Alexander then took this test further. He reran the early experiments, where the rats were left alone, and became compulsive users of the drug. He let them use for fifty-seven days - if anything can hook you, it's that. Then he took them out of isolation, and placed them in Rat Park. He wanted to know - if you fall into that state of addiction, is your brain hijacked, so you can't recover? Do the drugs take you over? What happened is - again - striking. The rats seemed to have a few twitches of withdrawal - but they soon stopped their heavy use, and went back to having a normal life. The good cage saved them."

[click on the title for the full article]

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Lon Woodbury's insight:

In the 1980s, the tradition and the drug war focus was referred to and criticized as "The Medical Model."  -Lon

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Lisa A Romano's curator insight, January 22, 3:19 PM

Extraordinary. The concept of social recovery, and drugs are a substitute for a lack of social bonding 

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Redefining Mental Illness

Redefining Mental Illness | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
New research recognizes that diagnoses and drugs are not the only approach.

Via Penrith Farms
Lon Woodbury's insight:

The network of therapeutic boarding schools, wilderness therapy programs started in the 1980s rejecting the rigid diagnosis and treat mentality, referring to it as "medical model."  Much of what they did came under the category of "emotional growth schools and programs."  The traditional defining of mental illness has been questioned by many successful schools and programs in the last 30 years, and seem to be along the line of what this article presents. -Lon

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Penrith Farms's curator insight, January 19, 6:47 PM

Another salvo in the raging debate.  I don't know if this question will ever be answered.

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4 Incredible Benefits to Failing Miserably

4 Incredible Benefits to Failing Miserably | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Failure doesn't ruin your story. Failure helps you write it. Here's four reasons why failure is the best thing that can happen to you.
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When Stress Rises, Empathy Suffers - Article

When Stress Rises, Empathy Suffers - Article | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Humans—and mice—are much more likely to feel empathy toward friends than strangers. New research finds that stress hormones are to blame, writes Robert M. Sapolsky.


It’s rare to find individuals in whom stress brings out the best—fostering calm, rational thinking, deep humanity and the notion that strangers are just friends you’ve yet to meet.


More typically, stress literally and metaphorically narrows our field of vision; it tends to makes us less generous and cooperative in economic games, more xenophobic, more likely to interpret ambiguous expressions as hostile ones, and more likely to displace frustration and aggression onto those around us. As this new study on the biology of stress found, it also makes us less likely to feel someone else’s pain.


Science has amply demonstrated that, when we are stressed, there are adverse consequences for our blood pressure, digestive tract, immune system and so on. This research shows that, when we are stressed, there are also adverse consequences for those stuck being around us.



Via Edwin Rutsch
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Cheerleading is More Dangerous Than You Think

Cheerleading is More Dangerous Than You Think | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
Modern day cheerleading has progressed beyond pretty girls waving pom-poms on the sidelines. It’s now an ultra-competitive sport filled with physically
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