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Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens
News and Opinion of Interest to Parents and Professionals Working with With Struggling Young People - Web Page www.strugglingteens.com
Curated by Lon Woodbury
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Learning & Mind & Brain
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The mass attention deficit era: what businesses can learn from schools

The mass attention deficit era: what businesses can learn from schools | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
We are living through the first era of mass attention deficit.

You’ll recognise it if, like me, you struggle to read a book from start to finish, or if you start a task only to end up following a maze of different weblinks instead. And you’ll understand it if you have friends who just can’t put their phones down: on average, we check them 150 days a day, according to Nokia research.

It would be tempting to say this is just a millennial phenomenon; that a generation of self-centered 20- and 30-somethings is getting sucked into the screen. But, if you thought this group is bad, just look to the next generation.


The brain is changing

Kids aged eight to 18 spend twice as much time with screens as they spend in school. Children have fundamentally different cognitive skills nowadays and they are too easily distracted, according to two pieces of research by the Pew Internet Project, in which US teachers said kids need more time away from digital technologies. In the UK, shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt has suggested children receive lessons in concentration – an ironic proposition, to be sure.

But fighting modern modalities is not the best way to fit the reality of consumption and comprehension today. If brains are evolving to favour constant, short bursts of information, it is unlikely this can be reversed. Even in 1976 a study found that in-lesson concentration ebbed and flowed, topping out at just 10 to 18 minutes.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Lon Woodbury's insight:

This is the reason I try to limit stories on my online newsletter to 500 words, and the reason I'm shifting from 50 minute segments on internet talk radio to less than 10 minute interviews.  -Lon

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 16, 8:13 PM

Are we saying this is good change? What if paid attention to the changes that are happening, not to control them, but to experience them more fully.

 

I am not sure School, the way it is structured, has much to offer.

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Eclectic Technology
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Michael Wesch: How the Internet has changed us

Michael Wesch: How the Internet has changed us | Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens | Scoop.it
If you’ve ever slowed down long enough to wonder about the effect of our increasing immersion in the world of social media and digital technology, Michael Wesch is the person to ask.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 28, 2013 9:07 PM

The comment I like best in this interview is the final part of this interview. He states:
"We live in an age of almost infinite information and learning opportunity and so the key here is we have to inspire people to have a sense of wonder and curiosity and if we do that, they have what is essentially the world’s largest knowledge machine at their fingertips. If we fail at that they have the world’s largest distraction device."

The question we may want to ask ourselves is how do move our students to have the "sense of wonder and curiuosity"?