Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens
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Woodbury Reports Review of News and Opinion Relating To Struggling Teens
News and Opinion of Interest to Parents and Professionals Working with With Struggling Young People - Web Page www.strugglingteens.com
Curated by Lon Woodbury
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Rescooped by Lon Woodbury from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Misleading claims regarding ChromaGen lenses to treat dyslexia: The International Dyslexia Association

"In recent months, articles have surfaced claiming that ChromaGen colored lenses have been FDA approved for the treatment of Dyslexia. While the lenses have been approved to aid in the treatment of visual problems, they have not been approved to treat Dyslexia. 

Although some individuals with Dyslexia may also have visual difficulties, Dyslexia is not primarily a vision problem; it is a language-based problem that is neuro-biological in origin and cannot be treated by visual aids. It is important to understand the difference. There is a great deal of research and information available regarding vision and dyslexia and we urge you to review the following to stay abreast of the facts:..."


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, September 1, 2013 1:07 PM

Let's consider the data going back 3 decades: While some dyslexics may have visual problems, dyslexia is not a 'visual"condition that can be treated with colored lenses. 'nuff said.--Lou


Excerpt


"Dyslexia: The Eyes Don’t Have It:  For those attending the Annual Reading, Literacy & Learning Conference in New Orleans, November 6-9, 2013, there is a fascinating session focusing on this topic.  Dr. Sheryl Handler, Chairman of the American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Learning Disabilities Task Force, along with Dr. Walter Fierson, Vice-chairman of the American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Learning Disabilities Task Force, and Dr. A. Melinda Rainey, Section Chief, Dell Children’s Eye Center of Central Texas and American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Learning Disabilities Task Force, will present the session:

F25: Dyslexia: The Eyes Don’t Have It
This session will give a comprehensive summary of the latest information on reading, dyslexia, and the role of vision. Controversial topics including the Magnocellular Deficit Theory, Scotopic Sensitivity, and Behavioral Optometric Theories, will be discussed. Commonly promoted therapies including colored lenses and filters, low-power lenses, and vision therapy, will be reviewed and examples shown. The participant will gain a thorough understanding of the issues and controversies and how to examine and interpret research regarding vision and dyslexia.."