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5 Ways to Rethink Corporate Knowledge Sharing

5 Ways to Rethink Corporate Knowledge Sharing | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
The quest to effectively share knowledge within a company is one that still appears elusive.  How do you keep on top of your competitors' developments?  How to do you monitor articles that mention your brand?

Via Guillaume Decugis
Marty Koenig's insight:


There is so much more corporations can do to share knowledge. Sharing conversations using IM and private social media like Yammer is just the tip of the iceberg. I believe curation will be one catalyst that solves the firehose issue and lets people engage in the topics they are interested in for their career aspirations and adding more value to their employer. Scoop.it will be the leader in this next quest.

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Ennio Martignago's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:18 AM

Ripensare la Corporate Knowledge Sharing in 5 punti

Jordi Carrió Jamilà's curator insight, November 12, 2013 1:08 AM

Interesante artículo de cómo enfocar la curación en las empresas

Stepanov Sergey Mikhailovich's curator insight, March 20, 2:19 PM

Music " Reflection " for Independence of Ukraine.
http://soundcloud.com/stepanov-sergei/reflection-1
       FIND...
Find your dream , find your way , find your star ,
find your love, find your friend,
find your beat in your heart .
       FIND
Find your dream, find your way , find your star ,
find your love, find your friend,
find your love to Ukraine .
                                                         by  Stepanov      Ukraine

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Managing: Responding to a candidate who turns down an offer - Denver Business Journal

Managing: Responding to a candidate who turns down an offer - Denver Business Journal | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Each week Alison Green, who also writes the Ask a Manager website , answers workplace and management questions from readers.
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Harvard cracks DNA storage, crams 700 terabytes of data into a single gram | ExtremeTech

Harvard cracks DNA storage, crams 700 terabytes of data into a single gram | ExtremeTech | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
A bioengineer and geneticist at Harvard's Wyss Institute have successfully stored 5.5 petabits of data -- around 700 terabytes -- in a single gram of DNA, smashing the previous DNA data density record by a thousand times.
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Why whale poo could be the secret to reversing the effects of climate change

Why whale poo could be the secret to reversing the effects of climate change | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Philip Hoare: I have been at the wrong end of a defecating sperm whale: it smells, it's nutrient rich, and could just save the world
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World’s fastest wireless network hits 100 gigabits per second, can scale to terabits | ExtremeTech

World’s fastest wireless network hits 100 gigabits per second, can scale to terabits | ExtremeTech | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
German researchers have combined photonics and electronics to create a world-record-breaking wireless network that can send and receive data at a heady 100 gigabits per second (Gbps). This beats the same team's previous world record of 40Gbps. At 100Gbps, or a transfer rate of 12.5 gigabytes per second -- ten times faster than Google Fiber -- you could copy a complete Blu-ray disc in a couple of seconds.
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Spider-drones weave high-rise structures out of cables

Spider-drones weave high-rise structures out of cables | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Forget scaffolding and cranes – architects and roboticists are teaching drones to build web-like structures from cables that spool out behind them
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16 Ways An Interviewer Judges Your Potential

16 Ways An Interviewer Judges Your Potential | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
You have to break the rules sometimes.
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I can't believe this Hubble's star explosion time-lapse video is real

I never imagined I was going to see something like this: A video of a star bursting in space, illuminating the interstellar dust around it at the speed of light. This is not a computer simulation. It's an actual time-lapse video taken over four years by the Hubble—and scientists don't know its origin yet.
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Depth Maps Hidden in Google Street View Create Flickering Ghost-Cities

Depth Maps Hidden in Google Street View Create Flickering Ghost-Cities | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
This is awesome: Patricio Gonzalez Vivo found a way to scrape Google Street View for its depth map data, then rebuilt the streets as ghostly spatial models in openFrameworks. The weird and flickering results, seen in the video above, are like a holograph dreaming of electric streets, with facades and sidewalks tuning in and out as if being tuned on shortwave radio.
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Total Volume of Saturn Moon Titan's Otherworldly Seas Calculated

Total Volume of Saturn Moon Titan's Otherworldly Seas Calculated | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Titan harbors about 2,000 cubic miles of liquid methane and ethane on its frigid surface. The hydrocarbons are contained in an area near Titan's north pole that's just 660,000 square miles in size, a region slightly larger than Alaska.
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Scientists take "4D printing" a step further

Scientists take "4D printing" a step further | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it

Using a 3D printer, people can already determine the length, width and depth of an object that they create. Thanks to research being conducted at the University of Colorado, Boulder, however, a fourth dimension can now be included – time. And no, we're not talking about how long it takes to 3D-print an item. Instead, it's now possible to print objects that change their shape at a given time.

 

The scientists, led by Prof. H. Jerry Qi, have developed a "4D printing" process in which shape-memory polymer fibers are deposited in key areas of a composite material item as it's being printed. By carefully controlling factors such as the location and orientation of the fibers, those areas of the item will fold, stretch, curl or twist in a predictable fashion when exposed to a stimulus such as water, heat or mechanical pressure.

 

The concept was proposed earlier this year by MIT's Skylar Tibbits, who used his own 4D printing process to create a variety of small self-assembling objects. "We advanced this concept by creating composite materials that can morph into several different, complicated shapes based on a different physical mechanism,” said Martin L. Dunn of the Singapore University of Technology and Design, who collaborated with Qi on the latest research.

 

This means that one 4D-printed object could change shape in different ways, depending on the type of stimulus to which it was exposed. That functionality could make it possible (for example) to print a photovoltaic panel in a flat shape, expose it to water to cause it to fold up for shipping, and then expose it to heat to make it fold out to yet another shape that's optimal for catching sunlight.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Samantha Hogan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:44 PM

Wow! Interested to see what the next step will be in 3D printing!

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 8, 2013 4:53 PM

This 4D printing is reminding me of Star Trek's replicator...is food next?

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5 Ways to Rethink Corporate Knowledge Sharing

5 Ways to Rethink Corporate Knowledge Sharing | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
The quest to effectively share knowledge within a company is one that still appears elusive.  How do you keep on top of your competitors' developments?  How to do you monitor articles that mention your brand?

Via Guillaume Decugis
Marty Koenig's insight:


There is so much more corporations can do to share knowledge. Sharing conversations using IM and private social media like Yammer is just the tip of the iceberg. I believe curation will be one catalyst that solves the firehose issue and lets people engage in the topics they are interested in for their career aspirations and adding more value to their employer. Scoop.it will be the leader in this next quest.

more...
Ennio Martignago's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:18 AM

Ripensare la Corporate Knowledge Sharing in 5 punti

Jordi Carrió Jamilà's curator insight, November 12, 2013 1:08 AM

Interesante artículo de cómo enfocar la curación en las empresas

Stepanov Sergey Mikhailovich's curator insight, March 20, 2:19 PM

Music " Reflection " for Independence of Ukraine.
http://soundcloud.com/stepanov-sergei/reflection-1
       FIND...
Find your dream , find your way , find your star ,
find your love, find your friend,
find your beat in your heart .
       FIND
Find your dream, find your way , find your star ,
find your love, find your friend,
find your love to Ukraine .
                                                         by  Stepanov      Ukraine

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Ancient City Found in India, Irradiated from Atomic Blast - वेद Veda

Ancient City Found in India, Irradiated from Atomic Blast - वेद Veda | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
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Noise-canceling tech could lead to Internet connections 400 times faster than Google Fiber

Noise-canceling tech could lead to Internet connections 400 times faster than Google Fiber | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
The basic mechanism behind noise-canceling headphones could boost both the speed and reliability of Internet connections, according to researchers that published findings via Nature Photonics.
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Denver ranks No. 1 in nation in employment opportunities (Slideshow) - Denver Business Journal

Denver ranks No. 1 in nation in employment opportunities (Slideshow) - Denver Business Journal | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
WalletHub ranks Denver and Aurora in the top 20 of the largest U.S. cities on economic improvement since the Great Recession.
Marty Koenig's insight:

Yep.

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Invisibility gun uses a beam of darkness to make objects vanish from sight | ExtremeTech

Invisibility gun uses a beam of darkness to make objects vanish from sight | ExtremeTech | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Researchers at the National University of Singapore have built a beam of darkness that can make objects invisible from a long distance away. This isn't the plot from some not-so-distant sci-fi movie: It really works. The beam of darkness can create a 3D region of invisibility -- or
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Data Center In a Box Startup NIMBOXX Raises $12M, Launches Product

Data Center In a Box Startup NIMBOXX Raises $12M, Launches Product | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Hong Kong investor arranges Series A round; early adopter reports impressive performance, easy set-up Read More
Marty Koenig's insight:

It's about time someone did this. 

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The Fermi Paradox - Wait But Why

The Fermi Paradox - Wait But Why | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Scientists estimate that there are over 100,000 intelligent alien civilizations in our galaxy alone—but we've never heard anything from any of them. Here are 13 possible explanations for why.
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Lou Adler’s Hiring Troubleshooting Guide

Lou Adler’s Hiring Troubleshooting Guide | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
The following guide is current as of June 3, 2014
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What a space settlement would actually look like in real life

What a space settlement would actually look like in real life | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
We are used to see space settlements in sci-fi illustrations and movies, but these are not realistic. Bryan Versteeg—from Spacehabs—uses scientific principles to develop concepts that can actually happen one day. The Kalpana One Space Settlement is one of them. Bryan has sent us new renders of this awesome place.
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Driven by Facebook and Google, Mobile Ad Market Soars 105% in 2013

Driven by Facebook and Google, Mobile Ad Market Soars 105% in 2013 | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Global mobile ad spending increased 105.0% last year to hit $17.96 billion, according to new eMarketer estimates. Spending on mobile ads worldwide will rise another 75.1% in 2014, thanks largely to Facebook and Google.

Via Deanna Dahlsad
Marty Koenig's insight:

Makes you wonder what's next.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, March 23, 4:35 PM

Why some call Facebook "Ad Face".

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A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death

A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it

When people have nerve problems such as those caused by spinal injuries, they can lose the ability to feel when their bladder is full. This means that they don't know when it needs to be emptied, resulting in a build-up of pressure that can damage both the bladder and their kidneys. Now, a tiny sensor may offer a better way of assessing their condition, to see if surgery is required or if medication will suffice.


Presently, in order to observe how well the bladder is functioning, a catheter is inserted into the patient's urethra and used to fill their bladder with saline solution. This is understandably uncomfortable for the patient, plus it's claimed to provide an inaccurate picture of what's going on, as the bladder fills up much more quickly than would normally be the case.


That's why scientists at Norwegian research group SINTEF are proposing replacing the catheters with tiny pressure sensors. The current prototypes can be injected into the bladder directly through the skin, and could conceivably stay in place for months or even years, providing readings without any discomfort, and without requiring the bladder to be filled mechanically.


Patients would be able to move around normally, plus the risk of infection would reportedly be reduced. Currently readings are transmitted from the prototypes via a thin wire that extents from the senor out through the skin, although it is hoped that subsequent versions could transmit wirelessly – perhaps even to the patient's smartphone.


Next month, a clinical trial involving three spinal injury patients is scheduled to begin at Norway's Sunnaas Hospital. Down the road, plans call for trials involving 20 to 30 test subjects.


Although they're currently about to be tested in the bladder, the sensors could conceivably be used to measure pressure almost anywhere in the body.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Care and Feeding of Networks & 10 Must Follow Scoopiteers

Care and Feeding of Networks & 10 Must Follow Scoopiteers | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it

This post was fun to write. I spent the morning writing about the importance of thinking digital first. This post shares 5 tips about the care and feeding of possibly your most important asset - your network of support, advocacy and content. If your content network isn't the most important thing no one really thinks about very often I don't know what is. 

Since it isn't fair to tease such a list and not share, here is my list of 10 Must Follow Scoopers:

@Robin Good 
@Guillaume Decugis
@Ally Greer 
@ janlgordon 
@Jesús Hernández
@Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
@Karen Dietz
@Thierry Saint-Paul 
@Neil Ferree
@Ana Cristina Pratas  

If you want to see what each of these great content curators has taught me you will need to read the post (since I'm not one to spoil a tease :).   


Via Martin (Marty) Smith, Karen Dietz
Marty Koenig's insight:

Great Scoop, Karen!

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 9, 2013 5:48 AM

This is a link to a blog by Martin Smith his opinions about how to make your network and connections stronger and who to look towards for direction and inspiration.

Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's curator insight, November 9, 2013 9:56 AM

Totally agree with Marty, each of these Scoopers uses Scoop.it to build their readership.  That's right they are using Other Peoples Content (OPC) that they curate to build their own following and traffic to their channels be it a website or social network. 

Tahar Mehenni's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:10 AM

       Le 04 Décembre de l'année 2013     

                       Bonjour madame,

                                          Bonjour monsieur,

Êtes vous intéressés par un challenge en recevant dés votre inscription gratuitement  et sans aucun engagement de votre part des actions convertibles immédiatement après le lancement du méga réseau social  actuellement en phase de  pré-organisation GloballSare ? Si oui cliquez sur ce lien et inscrivez vous sans tarder car l'offre est limitée dans le temps:

http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1469288.html

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Google Announces Live Video Tutorials Called 'Helpouts'

Google Announces Live Video Tutorials Called 'Helpouts' | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it
Google has built an empire with a search engine that answers your questions, and now the company hopes humans can do the same Google on Tuesday announced Helpouts, a new tool that connects users via live video chat with experts who can help them...

Via Steven Healey
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Steven Healey's curator insight, November 6, 2013 3:52 AM

I attended my first helpout last night , a 15 minute live video call with screen sharing . It worked well and I learned some new tricks from a seasoned G + user .

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Glioblastoma multiforme: Incurable brain cancer gene BCL2L12 is silenced

Glioblastoma multiforme: Incurable brain cancer gene BCL2L12 is silenced | Interesting Sciences | Scoop.it

Scientists at Northwestern University say they were able to demonstrate the successful delivery of a drug that turns off a critical gene in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), increasing survival rates significantly in animals with the deadly disease. This form of brain cancer, which ended Sen. Edward Kennedy’s life, kills approximately 13,000 Americans a year.

 

According to the investigators, the novel therapeutic, which is based on nanotechnology, is small and nimble enough to cross the blood-brain barrier and get to where it is needed—the brain tumor.

 

Designed to target a specific cancer-causing gene in cells, the drug flips the switch of the oncogene to “off,” silencing the gene, they added. This knocks out the proteins that keep cancer cells immortal.

 

In a study of mice (“Spherical Nucleic Acid Nanoparticle Conjugates as an RNAi-Based Therapy for Glioblastoma”), the nontoxic drug was delivered by intravenous injection. In animals with GBM, the survival rate increased nearly 20%, and tumor size was reduced three to four fold, as compared to the control group. The results were published October 30 in Science Translational Medicine.

 

“We preclinically evaluate an RNA interference (RNAi)–based nanomedicine platform, based on spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoparticle conjugates, to neutralize oncogene expression in GBM,” wrote the scientists. “In vivo, the SNAs penetrated the blood-brain barrier and blood-tumor barrier to disseminate throughout xenogeneic glioma explants. SNAs targeting the oncoprotein Bcl2Like12 (Bcl2L12)—an effector caspase and p53 inhibitor overexpressed in GBM relative to normal brain and low-grade astrocytomas—were effective in knocking down endogenous Bcl2L12 mRNA and protein levels, and sensitized glioma cells toward therapy-induced apoptosis by enhancing effector caspase and p53 activity.”

 

“This is a beautiful marriage of a new technology with the genes of a terrible disease,” said Chad A. Mirkin, Ph.D., a nanomedicine expert and a senior co-author of the study.

 

“This proof-of-concept further establishes a broad platform for treating a wide range of diseases, from lung and colon cancers to rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.”

 

The power of gene regulation technology is that a disease with a genetic basis can be attacked and treated if scientists have the right tools, pointed out Dr. Mirkin. Thanks to the Human Genome Project and genomics research over the last two decades, there is an enormous number of genetic targets; having the right therapeutic agents and delivery materials has been the challenge, he explained.

 

“The RNA interfering-based SNAs are a completely novel approach in thinking about cancer therapy,” said Alexander H. Stegh, Ph.D., a co-author on the study. “One of the problems is that we have large lists of genes that are somehow disregulated in glioblastoma, but we have absolutely no way of targeting all of them using standard pharmacological approaches.

 

That's where we think nanomaterials can play a fundamental role in allowing us to implement the concept of personalized medicine in cancer therapy.”

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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What does it mean when Earth's magnetic pole shifts?

magnetic north pole has moved 161 miles in 6 months only, this puts its arrival in siberia in less that 2 years, and it is when it arrives there that it will...
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