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Report: Half of all supermarket chicken harbors drug-resistant bacteria

Report: Half of all supermarket chicken harbors drug-resistant bacteria | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
A Consumer Reports investigation found potentially dangerous pathogens in nearly all of the chicken it tested

 

Dangerous bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant “superbugs,” lurk in nearly all supermarket chicken, an investigation by Consumer Reports revealed.

 

The nonprofit organization tested 300 samples of store-bought chicken breasts, and found that 97 percent harbored one of six types of illness-inducing bacteria, including E. coli and salmonella. Over half contained fecal contaminants, most commonly enterococcus. Included in the test were samples labeled “organic” and “antibiotic-free” — neither showed a significant difference in bacteria from conventional samples. In fact, there was little difference in bacteria content between any of the brands or types of chicken tested.

 

“It’s unrealistic to expect that the uncooked chicken you buy won’t contain any potentially harmful bacteria,” the report acknowledges. “At the moment,” added Urvashi Rangan, Ph.D., toxicologist and executive director of the Consumer Reports Food Safety and Sustainability Center, “the only way to protect yourself from becoming sick is to remain vigilant about safe handling and cooking.”

But some pathogens are worse than others. Troublingly, the report found that about half of the samples contained drug-resistant bacteria.

Antibiotic resistance is a growing concern in the public health sphere: Currently, drug-resistant infections are responsible for at least 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. The FDA has taken initial steps toward phasing out the widespread use of antibiotics in meat, proposing voluntary guidelines for pharmaceutical companies. But Consumer Reports has joined other critics in insisting that this plan isn’t assertive enough: In a letter sent Wednesday to the FDA commissioner, the group wrote that there is “much more the agency must do to better protect the public health and to reduce the use of antibiotics in food animals.”

 

In an email to the Huffington Post, the National Chicken Council asserted that “99.99% of servings of chicken are consumed safely.” Given the large amount of chicken consumed in the U.S., HuffPo points out, that amounts to 16,000 unsafe servings each day.

Lindsay Abrams is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on all things sustainable. Follow her on Twitter @readingirl, email labrams@salon.com. More Lindsay Abrams.

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Sue Townsend dead: Adrian Mole's best quotes

Sue Townsend dead: Adrian Mole's best quotes | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

 

Sue Townsend will best be remembered for her much-loved Adrian Mole diaries.

 

Sue Townsend will best be remembered for her much-loved Adrian Mole diaries.

 

Her socially awkward and self-proclaimed 'intellectual' teenage creation has spawned one of the most successful book series of our time.

Townsend instilled wit and wisdom into her 13 ¾ year old protagonist, whose commentary ranged from class consciousness, the British political system, and -not forgetting - his undying love for neighbour Pandora Braithwaite.

 

His wit and wisdom have planted him fondly in the British imagination where he will doubtless live for decades more.

 

Townsend said her favourite Adrian Mole quote was the last line of the first diary, written after Mole had tried glue sniffing and accidentally stuck a model aeroplane to his nose: “I rang Pandora, she is coming round after her viola lesson. Love is the only thing that keeps me sane…”

 

Here we round-up some of the best lines from Your Humble and Obedient Servant, A Mole.

Adrian Mole's best quotes

1. “My skin is dead good. I think it must be a combination of being in love and Lucozade.”

 

2. “I have realised I have never seen a dead body or a real female nipple. This is what comes of living in a cul-de-sac.”

 

3. “I have a problem. I am an intellectual, but at the same time I am not very clever."

 

4. “I asked Pandora how long she would love me. She said, ‘As long as Britain has Gibraltar.’”

 

5. “Guilt is a destructive emotion and doesn’t fit in with my Life Plan.”

6. “I was racked with sexuality but it wore off when I helped my father put manure on our rose bed.”

 

7. “Mrs Thatcher has got eyes like a psychotic killer, but a voice like a gentle person. It is a bit confusing.”

 

8. “My mother is in the hospital grounds smoking a cigarette. She is looking old and haggard. All the debauchery is catching up with her.”

 

9. “Perhaps when I am famous and my diary is discovered people will understand the torment of being a 13 3/4 year old undiscovered intellectual.”

 

10. “The tap drips and keeps me awake/ In the morning there will be a lake” – one of the first poems written by Adrian Albert Mole, aged 13 ¾.

 

11. “Pandora smiled at me in school dinner today, but I was choking on a piece of gristle so I couldn't smile back. Just my luck!”

 

12. “Evelyn Waugh must be dead proud of his daughter, Auberon.”

 

13. “There's only one thing more boring than listening to other people's dreams, and that's listening to their problems.”

 

14. “My father was reading Playboy under cover of the candlelight and I was reading Hard Times by my key-ring torch.”

 

15. “After hearing the disgusting noises from downstairs last night, I have also vowed never to drink alcohol.”

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Satirist, Political comedian Stephen Colbert is replacing Letterman on CBS’s late-night TV show: where real American power lies. A perfect platform to spread his satirical message..

Satirist, Political comedian Stephen Colbert is replacing  Letterman on CBS’s  late-night TV show: where real American power lies. A  perfect platform  to spread his satirical message.. | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

"The Hollywood Reporter called him the “best possible candidate [with] an insatiable appetite for pop culture, politics, music – pretty much anything in the zeitgeist – and he has the ideal mind for taking in those information streams, filtering out what’s important and then commenting on that”.

 

And also:

"Stephen Colbert Is Replacing Letterman. Here Are His Best—and Worst—Political Moments"

 

:http://www.motherjones.com/mixed-media/2014/04/stephen-colbert-best-worst-political-moments-replacing-letterman-cbs-late-show


A LIFE IN BRIEF


Born: 13 May 1964, Washington DC.
Family: Youngest of 11 children, his father and two brothers were killed in a plane crash in 1974. Married Evelyn McGee in 1993; they have three children.
Education: Dropped out of a Virginian college to transfer to Northwestern University in Chicago to study theatre.
Career: Spent eight years as a correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart before launching The Colbert Report in 2005."

 

As soon as Stephen Colbert – who was announced on Thursday as the replacement for David Letterman on CBS’s The Late Show – was given his own show in 2005, it would quickly be known, simply, as “Colbert”.

 

The Colbert Report would be a career peak for most comics. Spun off from the success of Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show, on which Colbert was a “correspondent” for eight years, the Report gave Colbert’s alter ego, a bloviating conservative in the style of Bill O’Reilly, half an hour to put America to rights, four nights a week.

 

Because of it, Colbert has become an unlikely influence on US politics. He would run for president twice; co-host a rally attended by 215,000 people; riff with Obama; dance with Henry Kissinger and, bizarrely, testify in character in Congress about immigration. Now he’s conquered politics, he’s landed where real American power lies: late-night TV.

 

Colbert has driven a long road to the Ed Sullivan Theater. The 49-year-old was the 11th of 11 children born to Lorna Tuck and James Colbert, a doctor. It was a numerical position in his family which he admits to this day makes him fight for attention. The giant Catholic family, which now has wide roots in Colbert’s home town of Charleston, South Carolina, was torn apart on 11 September 1974, when an Eastern Airlines flight carrying Colbert’s father and brothers Peter and Paul crashed, killing all three.

 

His mother, who died last summer, sister Elizabeth (an aspirant politician) and their faith helped to hold the family together and, as such, Colbert remains a committed Christian, who teaches Sunday school.

Having dropped out of an all-male college in Virginia, Colbert moved to Chicago to study theatre at Northwestern University.

 

After graduating, Colbert joined the Second City improv troupe whose graduates included John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd and Bill Murray. His work there led to several shows on Comedy Central, and a later gig on The Dana Carvey Show – a short-lived sketch show which would help to launch the careers of Louis CK, Charlie Kaufman and Colbert’s Daily Show sparring partner Steve Carell. (The pair faced off in a segment called Even Stevphen.)

 

In 1997, Colbert got a call from a producer on ABC’s Good Morning America which was looking for “someone who looked straight but could act funny”,.......

 

A  mischief, his improved background and new press credentials led the Daily Show producer who hired him to suggest he may have been “genetically engineered” to be a correspondent on the show.

 

Colbert actually predated Jon Stewart there, but upon the latter’s arrival in 1998, The Daily Show began an arc towards its modern-day political influence. And, as the Bush years welcomed right-wing pundits such as Sean Hannity, O’Reilly and Rush Limbaugh, Colbert began to layer his character’s bombast.

 

But it wasn’t until The Colbert Report launched in 2005 that Colbert pushed himself into wider conversation.

 

His success came in part from a skill at creating the kind of content which can help spread the influence of late-night TV beyond 11pm.

 

Those included the hijacking of a poll to rename a Hungarian bridge and the invention of the word “truthiness” (“truth which comes from the gut, not the books”) which was named a 2005 word of the year.

 

As the Report aged, the comic’s persona sharpened. A behind-the-scenes 2007 clip gives the best explanation of how it works. In it, Colbert asks John Kerry: “You know that I’m in character, and that I’m an idiot? I’m wilfully ignorant of what we’re going to talk about, so disabuse me of my ignorance.”

 

As Stewart and Colbert became more influential, their role in politics has risen accordingly, with Colbert rarely breaking character.

 

That reached its apex with the pair’s 2010 Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear in Washington (a spoof of a similar event by Glenn Beck).

 

But it may have been Colbert’s surgical skewering of George W Bush at the 2006 White House correspondents’ dinner which made a global audience aware of Colbert’s comedy. Among many stings, Colbert told an unamused Bush: “Over the last five years, you people were so good – over tax cuts, WMD intelligence, the effect of global warming. We Americans didn’t want to know, and you had the courtesy not to try to find out.” The clip was a YouTube sensation and gave Colbert a reputation even among those who didn’t know his show. (It had a brief run here on the FX channel.)

 

From there, he’s risen from cult star to a regular face at award shows and the White House. (In the absence of a Madame Hollande, he sat next to Michelle Obama at a recent state dinner for the French President.) Both Colberts fear no one, not even the creators of the pop hit of the decade. When Daft Punk stood him up to go to the MTV awards instead last summer, Colbert responded by corralling stars including Matt Damon, Bryan Cranston (and Kissinger) for a version of “Get Lucky”.

 

CBS will be hoping he can do more of the same. Its president of entertainment, Nina Tassler, described Colbert as “head and tails above everyone else” when it came to replacing Letterman. ......

 

As if to prove it, he recently appeared on both The Tonight Show (Jimmy Fallon) and The Late Show (Letterman) out of character and excelled. Asked by Fallon if he’d “ever been romantically involved with a horse”, Colbert replied: “No, I wouldn’t say any romance was involved.” On Letterman, he dressed as a Dickensian urchin and sang.

 

In a late-night environment where there’s all to play for – with Leno & Letterman gone and going – Colbert’s knowledge of the rigours of a daily show, added to his popularity among cultured Americans, should ensure he’s a hit.

 

There has been, however, one dissenting voice – right-wing radio presenter Rush Limbaugh. His take? “CBS has just declared war on the heartland of America.” Which sounds exactl

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Springtime ignites with melodious birdsong

Springtime ignites with melodious birdsong | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
Gracing humanity with their melodious symphonic sounds, North American songbirds call attention to the advent of springtime.

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, March 27, 10:55 AM

Lot's of interest in the beneficial effects of birdsong recently.  This article gives a nice summary as to the positive affect birdsong can have on us human beings and makes the case that with ever increasing population density, we could definitely use more of it.  Julian Treasure would approve!

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New Johnny Cash album rescued from the vaults | The Seattle Times

New Johnny Cash album rescued from the vaults | The Seattle Times | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

Johnny Cash, ‘Out Among the Stars’ (Columbia/Legacy)

 

New Cash album uncovers tracks recorded in the 1980s. (Columbia/Legacy)

 

This release is a real find. It’s not a collection of unfinished demos, alternate tracks, or outtakes. It’s a bonafide, brand new Johnny Cash album compiled from tracks Cash recorded in 1981 and 1984 but were left to languish in the vaults. Until now.

 

 

Cash’s career had stalled in the ’80s, a time when he couldn’t even land an album on the country charts. But you wouldn’t know that from listening to these songs.

 

Working with “countrypolitan” producer Billy Sherrill (Tammy Wynette, George Jones), Cash has great fun duetting with wife June Carter Cash on the lively “Baby Ride Easy” and the mellow, romantic “Don’t You Think It’s Come Our Time.” “I’m Movin’ On,” where he trades lines with Waylon Jennings, foreshadows his later work with Jennings in country supergroup the Highwaymen.

 

It’s the light-hearted material that goes down best; the jokey “If I Told You Who It Was,” describes a romantic encounter with teasing lines like “Her tire, unlike her body, was very flat.”

 

The only disappointment for Cash fans is that the album is a mere 12 tracks (there’s also a superfluous bonus track with remix of “She Used to Love Me a Lot” by Elvis Costello). But it’s still nice to get to spend a little more time with the Man in Black.


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The Great Divide: Global income inequality and its cost

The Great Divide: Global income inequality and its cost | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

Income inequality is surging, and there are few countries where it is rising faster than the United States.

 

The distance between rich and poor is greater in America than nearly all other developed countries, making the US a leader in a trend that economists warn has dire consequences.

 

GlobalPost sets out on a reporting journey to get at the ‘ground truth’ of inequality through the lenses of education, race, immigration, health care, government, labor and natural resources.

 

The hope is to hold a mirror up to the US to see how it compares to countries around the world.

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8K people have signed a petition to give Alaska to Russia

8K people have signed a petition to give Alaska to Russia | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

And counting.  

 

Secession. It's all the rage. A petition appeared on whitehouse.gov this week, asking Obama to give Alaska to Russia.

So far, 8,534 people have signed it — which is 389 more people than when I took the screenshot below 24 minutes ago.

The petition doesn't make a ton of sense, but the gist seems to be that Russians deserve Alaska because they got there first a long time ago.

The petition, called "Alaska back to Russia" states:

 

Groups Siberian russians crossed the Isthmus (now the Bering Strait) 16-10 thousand years ago

 

Russian began to settle on the Arctic coast, Aleuts inhabited the Aleutian Archipelago.

 

First visited Alaska August 21, 1732, members of the team boat "St. Gabriel »under the surveyor Gvozdev and assistant navigator I. Fedorov during the expedition Shestakov and DI Pavlutski 1729-1735 years

 

Vote for secession of Alaska from the United States and joining Russia

 

The White House only responds to petitions with 100,000 or more signatures, so the Alaska secessionists have a ways to go.

The more than 100,000 people who signed a petition for Texas to secede over a year ago were basically told no.

According to dailysheeple.com, the White House responded to the Texas secessionists, saying the reason was because our founding fathers established the United States as a “perpetual union.”

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/united-states/140323/8k-people-have-signed-petition-give-alaska-russi

Aulde de B's insight:

azy comments below thz vidoe

 

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Watch this badass Catholic nun rock Alicia Keys on Italy's 'The Voice'

Watch this badass Catholic nun rock Alicia Keys on Italy's 'The Voice' | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

"Pope Francis isn't the only one changing the face of Catholicism these days.By the grace of God go this nun.

 

This is so great. A Catholic nun in full habit sang Alicia Keys' "No One" on Italy's version of "The Voice" this week.

 

She didn't just sing it. She rocked it:

 

The video is so great, largely because the nun, 25-year-old Sicilian Cristina Scuccia, has kickin' pipes, but also because the audition is blind, and you get to see the judges' faces when they turn around to take in the fact that the woman singing is indeed Sister Scuccia.

 

You also get to see the Ursuline Sisters of the Holy Family bob up and down with excitement as their fellow sister wins accolades from the judges and audience alike.

 

Needless to say, Scuccia made it onto the show, according to the Washington Post. We'll see what happens next.

 

Scuccia says it would be nice to win, but she's really in it for the love of song. No wait, actually she's there to spread the word of God.

"I came here because I have a gift, and I want to share that gift. I am here to evangelize," she told the judges.

 

Pope Francis isn't the only one changing the face of Catholicism. 

"The Voice" originated in The Netherlands, and like so many of these talent-based reality TV shows it has spinoffs in more than a dozen countries.

 

Not only does the global mish-mash of these shows make for stellar entertainment, but it also provides a fascinating barometer of the cultural tide.

 

Let's not forget the 23-year-old from Cambridge, Mass., who made it to the finals on "Arabs Got Talent" singing classical Arabic music.

 

It's a big world. Things are getting mixed up. Sometimes in awesome ways. 

 

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/culture-lifestyle/entertainment/140321/catholic-nun-alicia-keys-italy

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Effects of music in hospitals

Effects of music in hospitals | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
Can music in hospital settings be beneficial? What kinds of beneficial effects can music have in this context? In general, music has been reported as beneficial in healthcare settings. Listening to music can have positive effects in particular areas of hospitals according to a report. Those areas

Via Andrew McCluskey
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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, March 24, 12:52 PM

Plenty of evidence, both scientific and anecdotal as to the benefits music can deliver to everybody at the hospital - patients and staff alike!  Another quick summary from Dr. Haake

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Hardy plants needed for tough city environment

Hardy plants needed for tough city environment | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

Researchers are looking at Australia's rocky outcrops as inspiration for deciding what to grow on city buildings.


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Snowden selfies: Edward Snowden roams TED2014 TED Blog Live

Snowden selfies: Edward Snowden roams TED2014  TED Blog Live | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

"A TED attendee snaps a photo with Edward Snowden, appearing on the stage"creen of a telepresence robot. Photo: Bret Hartman

"After speaking at TED2014, Edward Snowden roamed the halls. Here, some great photos by: Kate Torgovnick May March 18, 2014 at 7:00 pm PDT

"Edward Snowden appeared on the TED stage earlier today via a telepresence robot, which he was able to control remotely. So after giving the talk, “Here’s how we take back the internet” — which is now live on TED.com now (after our production team edited it in record time) — Snowden didn’t sign off. He decided to have a little fun and roam the halls of TED2014. First, he had a conversation with Sergey Brin, a moment snapped by one of TED’s engineers.From there, he kept on going, interacting with any attendees who wanted to talk to him or pose for what’s become known around the Vancouver Convention Centre as a “Snowden selfie.” Here, some images."

Edward Snowden walks, err rolls, around the convention center like any other attendee. Photo: Bret Hartman


Snowden debriefs with his lawyer immediately after coming offstage. Photo: Bret Hartman


A Snowden photo opp. Photo: Bret Hartman

Meanwhile, on social media, people are posting similar pics with the hashtag #selfiewithsnowden:

You never know who you might bump into at TED http://t.co/T0tl9xDSXe—;
Chris Anderson (@TEDchris) March 18, 2014

 

Best. Day. Ever. #SelfieWithSnowden #TED2014 http://t.co/5sb46AXW04— ; Alex Rudloff (@alexrudloff) March 18, 2014

 

#selfiewithsnowden http://t.co/ajyx1x9OY0—;
David Nott (@nottdavid) March 18, 201

.

@andrewhobgood is at the TED Conference and the surprise guest speaker was Edward Snowden! #selfiewithsnowden http://t.co/U5MY6fWfAe—; The New Colony (ch 18, 2014

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MUSIC-IDIOMS

MUSIC-IDIOMS | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

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Anatomy Arcade: basic human anatomy come ALIVE through awesome games, interactives & videos.

Anatomy Arcade:  basic human anatomy come ALIVE through awesome games, interactives & videos. | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
Anatomy Arcade makes basic human anatomy come ALIVE through awesome games, interactives and videos.

Via KB...Konnected
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KB...Konnected's curator insight, March 13, 1:21 PM

Some nice games for older students. Beware of advertising though.

Rio Harvey's curator insight, April 8, 4:09 AM

Use this activity to learn the basic human anatomy. There are different activities including Poke-a-muscle and muscle crosswords to help you learn the different muscle groups. Once you have done these activities I want you to answer the following questions:

1. What role does the muscular system play in Health and Physical Education?

2. What are the major muscle groups used in Rugby League?

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A writers best friend.

A writers best friend. | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
A writers best friend.

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Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, December 3, 2013 12:34 AM

Truly helpful chart for secondary students

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Giant rat takes over Swedish family’s kitchen after tunnelling through cement in cellar

Giant rat takes over Swedish family’s kitchen after tunnelling through cement in cellar | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
A Swedish family have described how they were terrorised by a giant rat which tunnelled through cement to take over their kitchen.

 

"Monster 15-inch rodent finally caught in huge mousetrap – yet still almost escaped alive"

 

"A Swedish family have described how they were terrorised by a giant rat which tunnelled through cement to take over their kitchen.

Pest controllers said the “Viking” monster, measuring 15 inches (40cm) not including the tail, was the largest rat they had ever seen.

 

The Bengtsson-Korsås family thought they must have had a mouse infestation after they heard noises coming from behind appliances in the kitchen – but darker suspicions were aroused when their cat started refusing to go near that part of the house.

 

It emerged that the rat had entered their basement by burrowing through wood and cement, carving out a lair for itself behind the dishwasher.

Signe Bengtsson-Korsås told the Swedish edition of The Local that first contact was made when she went to empty the bin under the sink.

“It was right there in our rubbish bin, a mighty monster. I was petrified. I couldn't believe such a big rat could exist,” she said.

 

 “I couldn't help but do the old classic and jump on the kitchen table and scream.”

Her husband, Eric Bengtsson-Korsås, said he was away at the time and thought his wife must have been exaggerating.

 

  'It was quite a shocking experience', said Ms Bengtsson-Korsås “By the time I got home, the rat was so domesticated that it just sat under the kitchen table,” Mr Bengtsson-Korsås said.

 

When they realised that the rat had chewed through the pipes at the back of the dishwasher, flooding part of the kitchen, the family put the area “on lockdown” and called in exterminators.

 

Pest controllers put down three huge traps, and a day later one went off.

Yet not willing to go down without a fight, the rat had disappeared – dragging the trap with it back behind the dishwasher. It later died – though the family’s children remained unconvinced.

 

“The kids were afraid it would come back to life as some sort of zombie rat. They didn't want to touch it,” Mr Bengtsson-Korsås added."

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Color Photographs of Imperial Russia Reveal a World Lost to History : vibrant photos of the pre-Soviet Russian Empire - Smithsonian

Color Photographs of Imperial Russia Reveal a World Lost to History : vibrant photos of the pre-Soviet Russian Empire - Smithsonian | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

"At Paris' Zadkine Museum, explore vibrant photos of the pre-Soviet Russian Empire..."

 

"In the early 20th century, two events changed Russia—and the world—forever: World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution.


There to capture Russia's way of life right before the change from a large, but isolated, agrarian society to an increasingly industrialized one was photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii.

 

In the early 1900s, Prokudin-Gorskii mapped out a plan for a photographic survey of the Russian Empire, a plan that won the support of Tsar Nicholas II.

 

Between 1909 and 1915, Prokudin-Gorskii crisscrossed the Russian Empire via train, taking photographs of 11 different regions. 150 of his photographs are now on display to the public in Paris' Zadkine Museum, to commemorate what would have been Prokudin-Gorskii's 150th birthday. 

 

Educated as a chemist, Prokudin-Gorskii studied with leading color photography experts in St. Petersburg, Berlin and Paris.

 

Through his inventive tinkering, he created a new method for producing vibrant color film slides. Prokudin-Gorskii created color images by exposing one oblong glass plate three times, in rapid succession, through three different color filters: red, green and blue.

He then presented these color images in slides by projecting the three different color images through three different lenses, one on top of another. When the three images were projected in concert, a full color image could be seen.

 

 Using this new method, Prokudin-Gorskii took over 2,000 images of the Empire, capturing everything from people to architecture to the Empire's expanding industrial infrastructure.

 

The images truly represent a lost world: many of the buildings that Prokudin-Gorskii photographed were destroyed in the Bolshevik Revolution.

 

The photos also show the wide ethnic diversity of the Russian Empire, from photographs of young peasant Russian girls to a series of images of Uzbek men and women.

 

The complete canon of Prokudin-Gorskii's work was purchased by the Library of Congress from his sons in 1948. You can view more of his work online through the Library of Congress's website.

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/prok/


The exhibit in Paris is on display through May 18, 2014. Admission to the main museum is free, but the exhibit itself carries a €4 (about $5.50) fee."


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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 1:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 7:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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This Indian artist painted more than 1,000 paintings with his tongue

This Indian artist painted more than 1,000 paintings with his tongue | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
Including an 8-foot Da Vinci and a portrait of Jesus Christ.

OK so this is relatively gross, but bear with me.

 

And also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SuokFJDZMI

 

This man, in an attempt to be a "different kind" of artist, has developed a method whereby he paints exclusively with his tongue.

 

Behold:

The artist's name is Ani K and when he isn't tilting his head at odd angles to achieve nuanced brushstrokes, he's a schoolteacher in Kerala, southern India.

 

"I wanted to be a different kind of artist," he says by way of explanation in the above video.

 

An age-old impulse, to be sure. But while some seek distinction through the content of their work, Ani K opted to explore the possiblities of form and method. 

 

He didn't jump straight to the tongue.

 

"I have tried painting with my nose, tried painting with my chin, my elbows and feet," the 35-year-old said. "I also tried drawing with both hands simultaneously, and also while riding on a moving bike."

The tongue, in the end, would serve Ani K, though not without a price.

"After painting with my tongue, I experience pain in my jaws, headaches, slight loss of vision and dip in memory power," he says. "The side effects stay around for two weeks."



With a slip of his tongue, Ani K has painted more than 1,000 works — including an eight-foot Da Vinci and a portrait of Jesus Christ. Keepin' it classic in some ways at least.

If the tongue won't lead Ani K to stardom, there are other ways.

"For the Guiness Records," he says, "I am going to paint four portraits using both hands and both feet at the same time.

 

Do send word when you do, Ani K. Don't bite your tongue.

 

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/india/140221/indian-artist-painted-more-1000-paintings-his-tongue

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Worked Over: The Global Decline of Labor Rights

Worked Over: The Global Decline of Labor Rights | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

From May Day to Labor Day, GlobalPost explores the human cost of what's been called a "RACE TO THE BOTTOM"."

 

The hyper-accelerated movement of capital, jobs and resources from the world's corporations — manufacturing, agriculture and service — TO THE LOWER BIDDER . In an era of diminished expectations, broken promises and sleight of hand, these are labor stories of governments, employers, unions and workers.

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Britain prosecutes first female genital mutilation case

Britain prosecutes first female genital mutilation case | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
The latest Department of Health figures from 2007 suggest that 66,000 women in England and Wales are living with the consequences of FGM.

Agence France-PresseMarch 21, 2014

 

The latest Department of Health figures from 2007 suggest that 66,000 women in England and Wales are living with the consequences of FGM.


This picture taken in Bandung on Feb. 10, 2013 shows two Indonesian doctors preparing for a circumcision in Bandung. The Indonesian government has come under fire after the UN General Assembly in November passed its first resolution condemning female genital mutilation (FGM) which more than 140 million women worldwide have been subjected to.

 

A London doctor and another man have become the first people to be charged in Britain over female genital mutilation, state prosecutors announced on Friday.

 

Dr. Dhanuson Dharmasena, 31, is accused of re-performing an FGM procedure on a woman who gave birth at his hospital in November 2012 following damage caused by labor.

 

Another man, Hasan Mohamed, 40, is accused of intentionally encouraging an offense of FGM, and of aiding, abetting, counselling or procuring Dharmasena to commit the offense.

 

It was not immediately clear what Mohamed's relationship to the victim was, but he is not a healthcare professional.

 

"It was alleged that following a patient giving birth in November 2012, a doctor at the Whittington Hospital, in London, repaired FGM that had previously been performed on the patient, allegedly carrying out FGM himself," said Alison Saunders, director of public prosecutions.

"Having carefully considered all the available evidence, I have determined there is sufficient evidence and it would be in the public interest to prosecute Dr Dhanuson Dharmasena."

 

Both Dharmasena, from Essex, east of London, and Mohamed, from north London, will appear at Westminster Magistrates' Court on April 15.

Some 100 to 140 million girls and women globally are thought to have undergone FGM, which ranges from removal of the clitoris to more widespread mutilation, and can lead to infection and long-term severe pain.

 

FGM has been illegal in Britain since 1985 but no-one has ever been prosecuted.

 

There have been increasing calls on police and the government to act, and last month ministers introduced a new requirement on British hospitals to keep a record of patients who have been subjected to FGM.

The latest Department of Health figures from 2007 suggest that 66,000 women in England and Wales are living with the consequences of FGM, and a further 23,000 girls under the age of 15 are at risk every year.

 

FGM was first made illegal in Britain under a 1985 law, which was extended in 2003 to make it an offence for British nationals or permanent residents to carry out FGM abroad or seek FGM abroad, even where it is legal.

 

The maximum penalty is 14 years in jail.

 

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/europe/united-kingdom/140321/britain-prosecutes-first-female-genital-mutilatio

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Maori one of most borrowed languages | The New Zealand Herald

Maori one of most borrowed languages | The New Zealand Herald | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

 

 English has taken most words from Latin and French but many Te Reo words now appear.

Te Reo Maori is among the top 20 of English's most borrowed-from languages in between Russian and Hindi, a book reveals.
Borrowed Words: A History of Loanwords in English examines how words borrowed from other languages have influenced English

 

Author Philip Durkin said 280 words from the Maori language are considered loanwords in the Oxford English Dictionary while Te Reo ranks at 14th in terms of languages English has borrowed from.

 

Latin and French are the leading lenders to English with at least 40,000 and 20,000 words respectively ahead of Greek, German, Italian, Spanish and Dutch.

 

Dr Durkin believed just one Maori word - kiwi - was the closest the language had to a Maori loanword used by many English speakers with little or no consciousness of its origins.

 

"The word had developed in meaning after it was borrowed into English, as an emblem of New Zealand, a nickname for any of various national representatives and then as a nickname for any New Zealander."

Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Maori interim chief executive Pita Paraone added the word haka as another used overseas.

 

"And I expect the use of kupu Maori to increase internationally as more New Zealanders, Maori and Pakeha, migrate to other countries."

 

Mr Paraone said non-Maori New Zealanders were now unconsciously using Maori words in their everyday vernacular. "Words such as mana, whanau, hikoi and hapu are examples of everyday use. We should also remember that the use of Maori words is not confined to New Zealand."

Dr Dianne Bardsley of the New Zealand Dictionary Centre said for every 1000 New Zealand English words, six were of Maori origin.

 

The Dictionary of New Zealand English includes 746 words of Maori origin with about 69 per cent names of flora and fauna, 18 per cent are connected with social culture and 13 per cent material culture.

 

Te Reo Maori had become more prominent since colonial times when very few institutions had Maori names and the country had moved on from times when a tui was called a parson bird and rimu red pine.

Maori and English blends and compounds such as "tiki tour" and "couch kumara" were increasing.

 

"To me, that is a sign of our unique bicultural lexis and reflective of the relationship that exists between Maori and non-Maori." Maori language borrowings were first recorded in the early 1800s but the number went down markedly later that century during the land wars.

 

The 1970s saw a renewed surge with Maori leaving their rural homes for cities and interacting more with Pakeha.

 

Dr Durkin said with the Maori population growing, support for the language, greater prominence of Maori in political discussions and positive attitudes towards the language and culture there could be more loanwords.

 

"It's likely that in the future we will see more words added that reflect more recent borrowing," he said.

- NZ Herald


Via musée du quai Branly
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Art - ESL Resources

Art - ESL Resources | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

ART



CONTENTS :

Activities to printList of artistsArtistsListeningCartoonsLiteratureCinemaMuralsColoursMyths and LegendsConversation questionsPowerPoint PresentationsDescribing picturesSongsFacts Street artGalleries and MuseumsTattoos and PiercingsInteractive activities VideosInteractive gamesVocabularyLesson plansWebquests

 


Via Renee Maufroid
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Renee Maufroid's curator insight, March 21, 11:41 PM

Loads of things!

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Reading: The Witch Doctor of Language Acquisition

Reading: The Witch Doctor of Language Acquisition | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
Author: Robert A. Robles ‘What is the best thing I can do to master the language I’m learning?’ ‘What do you recommend if I need to increase my vocabulary base?

Via Carol Goodey
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"Here's how we take back the Internet" out surveillance & Internet freedom Appearing by telepresence robot"" Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 + Transcript

"Here's how we take back the Internet" out surveillance & Internet freedom Appearing by telepresence robot"" Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 + Transcript | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

And also: http://blog.ted.com/2014/03/18/snowden-selfies-and-conversations-in-the-halls-edward-snowden-roams-ted2014/

" The right to data privacy, he suggests, is not a partisan issue, but requires a fundamental rethink of the role of the internet in our lives — and the laws that protect it. "Your rights matter,” he says, "because you never know when you're going to need them." Chris Anderson interviews, with special guest Tim Berners-Lee."

Edward SnowdenWhistleblower Guardian profile The NSA files   TED Speaker "In 2013 Edward Snowden leaked thousands of classified American National Security Agency documents, sparking a global conversation about citizens' rights to privacy on the Internet.""Why you should listen

"Edward Snowden was just about to turn 28 when his face was suddenly splashed across every major newspaper in the US. In the summer of 2013 The Guardian published a series of leaked documents about the American National Security Agency (NSA), starting with an article about a secret court order demanding American phone records from Verizon, followed by an article on the NSA's top-secret Prism program, said to be accessing user data from Google, Apple and Facebook.

 

It wasn't long before Snowden came forward as the source, revealing that he had carefully planned the leak, copying documents when he was working as a contractor for the NSA.

 

"I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions," he said at the time, but "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant."

 

Snowden's actions have led to a global debate on the relationship between national security and online privacy. His leaks continue to have a lasting impact on the American public's view of the government, and has encouraged media scrutiny on the NSA.

 

Snowden had coordinated the leak with journalist Glenn Greenwald and filmmaker Laura Poitras from Hong Kong; after he revealed his identity, he fled and ended up in Moscow. Under charges of espionage by the American government, Snowden remains in Russia in temporary asylum"

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 3:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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10 Business Idioms Using Cats and Dogs

10 Business Idioms Using Cats and Dogs | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it
The business world is full of animal idioms like fat cats, loan sharks and other animals. Indeed, the business idiom fat cats has been widely used in the last few years to describe all those banker...

Via TeachingEnglish, IdiomOfTheWeek, Marylin Alvarez
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