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Color Photographs of Imperial Russia Reveal a World Lost to History : vibrant photos of the pre-Soviet Russian Empire - Smithsonian

Color Photographs of Imperial Russia Reveal a World Lost to History : vibrant photos of the pre-Soviet Russian Empire - Smithsonian | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

"At Paris' Zadkine Museum, explore vibrant photos of the pre-Soviet Russian Empire..."

 

"In the early 20th century, two events changed Russia—and the world—forever: World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution.


There to capture Russia's way of life right before the change from a large, but isolated, agrarian society to an increasingly industrialized one was photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii.

 

In the early 1900s, Prokudin-Gorskii mapped out a plan for a photographic survey of the Russian Empire, a plan that won the support of Tsar Nicholas II.

 

Between 1909 and 1915, Prokudin-Gorskii crisscrossed the Russian Empire via train, taking photographs of 11 different regions. 150 of his photographs are now on display to the public in Paris' Zadkine Museum, to commemorate what would have been Prokudin-Gorskii's 150th birthday. 

 

Educated as a chemist, Prokudin-Gorskii studied with leading color photography experts in St. Petersburg, Berlin and Paris.

 

Through his inventive tinkering, he created a new method for producing vibrant color film slides. Prokudin-Gorskii created color images by exposing one oblong glass plate three times, in rapid succession, through three different color filters: red, green and blue.

He then presented these color images in slides by projecting the three different color images through three different lenses, one on top of another. When the three images were projected in concert, a full color image could be seen.

 

 Using this new method, Prokudin-Gorskii took over 2,000 images of the Empire, capturing everything from people to architecture to the Empire's expanding industrial infrastructure.

 

The images truly represent a lost world: many of the buildings that Prokudin-Gorskii photographed were destroyed in the Bolshevik Revolution.

 

The photos also show the wide ethnic diversity of the Russian Empire, from photographs of young peasant Russian girls to a series of images of Uzbek men and women.

 

The complete canon of Prokudin-Gorskii's work was purchased by the Library of Congress from his sons in 1948. You can view more of his work online through the Library of Congress's website.

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/prok/


The exhibit in Paris is on display through May 18, 2014. Admission to the main museum is free, but the exhibit itself carries a €4 (about $5.50) fee."


Via musée du quai Branly
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Watch People Act Out Paris's Subway Station Names : In Métropolisson, Apin set up amusing, carefully arranged scenes in nearly half of Paris Metro's 245 stations

Watch People Act Out Paris's Subway Station Names : In Métropolisson, Apin set up amusing, carefully arranged scenes in nearly half of Paris Metro's 245 stations | Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,) | Scoop.it

"In METROPOLISSON, Photographer Janol Api shoots playful scenes along the platforms.

http://www.janol-apin.com/photos/metropolisson

 

"While traveling along a subway line, our imaginations may take us to strange places. What, we might wonder, would a "Foggy Bottom" or "Cockfosters" actually look like?Photographer Janol Apin has given us some idea.  

 

Apin set up amusing, carefully arranged scenes in nearly half of Paris Metro's 245 stations. Each is meant to be a literal depiction of the station name.

 

In Argentine, for example, there are tango dancers. https://www.facebook.com/Janol.Apin.Photographe ;

 

At Château d'Eau (which translates to "Water Tower"), a man desperately reaches for a water cooler.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_d%27Eau_%28Paris_M%C3%A9tro%29  

 

And at Alexandre Dumas, hree musketeers put their swords to the air in unison."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandre_Dumas_%28Paris_M%C3%A9tro%29

 

"Apin tells Fast Company that the idea for the project came during a stop at Richard-Lenoir, when he saw a stranger posing underneath the station sign, causing Apin to think that the man could be Richard himself. Not surprisingly, he eventually came come back to the station with his camera, and a man in a t-shirt that says "Richard.""

 

Métropolisson "La photographie est un grand labyrinthe où les regards se croisent. Janol Apin nous invite à un voyage souterrain parfois candide, souvent drôle mais toujours anecdotique où l’image et le texte se rencontrent.  

 

D’Abbesses à Wagram, jeux de mots, charades et calembours se côtoient. Le métro de Paris comme vous ne l’avez jamais vu

! En voiture !  Découvrez le livre Métropolisson aux éditions Lacarothe."  

Rendez-vous sur la page facebook de Janol Apin pour en apprendre davantage sur le projet Métropolisson et partager vos commentaires ! https://www.facebook.com/Janol.Apin.Photographe

 

Pour contacter Janol Apin ou commander des photos ou livres :" Tél : (+33) 6 10 08 49 60    Email : lacarothe@gmail.com "


Via Seth Dixon
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