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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Interested things | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:15 AM

This article makes an argument for having a girl rather than a boy in China. With all of the males, brides are in high demand. Their demands for gifts are also high, as they can be picky with so many grooms looking for husbands. Parents of boys must pay for the apartment for the couple as a wedding gift and this puts a heavy financial strain on the family, especially when there are multiple boys.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 7:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 8:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

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Rescooped by Kacie Knyvett from Geography Education
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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Interested things | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
Kacie Knyvett's insight:

:P

more...
Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:15 AM

This article makes an argument for having a girl rather than a boy in China. With all of the males, brides are in high demand. Their demands for gifts are also high, as they can be picky with so many grooms looking for husbands. Parents of boys must pay for the apartment for the couple as a wedding gift and this puts a heavy financial strain on the family, especially when there are multiple boys.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 7:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 8:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

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Cool and Unique Christmas Trees

Cool and Unique Christmas Trees | Interested things | Scoop.it

The most beautiful and creative Christmas Trees from all over the world.


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Rescooped by Kacie Knyvett from Geography Education
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More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities

More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities | Interested things | Scoop.it

"This week's Boston Marathon bombing fit with the norm of U.S. terrorist events and threats in one important way: it occurred in a major city. American concerns about terrorism, however, seem to ignore that pattern...There’s a divide on people’s thoughts about terrorism. People that live in places most likely to be hit by terrorism seem the most sunny about the country’s anti-terror prospects and efforts. And those in rural places,  are more concerned and pessimistic."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 11:01 AM

This article cites data from the PEW Reseach Center that implies that city dwellers seem to feel less dread about terror threats than their suburban and rural counterparts, despite the fact they live in the primary target zone (see full size infographic here--note that the data was assembled before the Boston Marathon attack).  


Question to Ponder: Why are the Americans most vulnerable to terrorist attacks the least concerned with terrorism? 

 

Tagsterrorism, statistics, USA, infographic, urban.