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ScienceDirect.com - Journal of Business Research - Cross-cultural examination of online shopping behavior: A comparison of Norway, Germany, and the United States

Highlights

► We examine cross-cultural online shopping using the Technology Acceptance Model.

► The TAM held for the U.S. but the relationships did not hold for Germany and Norway.

► Cognitive involvement influences perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use.

► Affective involvement does not influence behavior intention in Germany.

 

Abstract

While the rise of the commercial Internet has promoted many brands to a globally ubiquitous status, convergent demand for certain goods and services masks many culture-bound differences in consumer shopping behaviors. Adopting the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), this research examines the role of culture in influencing online shopping use, comparing differences across three countries: Germany, Norway, and the United States. The roles of cognitive and affective involvement in driving technology perceptions and usage are also examined. After assuring measurement equivalence for study constructs, the study assesses differences in structural patterns across the countries. Findings show that the full TAM model does not hold for the European samples. In addition, cognitive involvement influences perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use in all countries, but the relationship between affective involvement and behavioral intention does not hold in Germany. 

 

To read the rest of the article, you need to access a library's database or go to: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148296311002906

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Bennett Model of Cultural Competence

Bennett Model of Cultural Competence | Intercultural | Scoop.it

The Bennett scale, also called the DMIS (for Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity), was developed by Dr. Milton Bennett. The framework describes the different ways in which people can react to cultural differences.


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Community Village Sites's curator insight, June 5, 2013 1:39 AM

Click through to read the 6 stages

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Promoting Cross-Cultural Competence in Intelligence Professionals ...

Promoting Cross-Cultural Competence in Intelligence Professionals ... | Intercultural | Scoop.it

Recent publications have highlighted alternative analytical thinking strategies to inform and facilitate improved intelligence analysis.  Red teaming, fast and slow thinking, divergent thinking, as well as other strategies have been identified as essential to understanding today's radically different, non-traditional landscape that analysts and collectors are expected to operate in: to understand, to provide meaning and context, and at times forecast likely outcome scenarios.


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Collaboration and cultural awareness essential in next generation of leaders

Collaboration and cultural awareness essential in next generation of leaders | Intercultural | Scoop.it
A new study has shown that Generation X value very different leadership qualities to their departing peers. How can organisations prepare and shift?

Via Amadou M. Sall, Shawn Simpson, Jenny Ebermann, Create Wise Leader, John Michel
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Shawn Simpson's curator insight, May 26, 2013 6:24 AM

This is a long overdue and meaningful change. Am very much looking forward to it.

John Michel's curator insight, May 27, 2013 10:36 AM

Organisations must also accommodate the different work attitudes and motivations of the generations, moving if necessary to a flatter organisational structure and providing opportunities for freer movement.

Deborah Long's curator insight, May 27, 2013 9:58 PM

An organizational shift and transition will occur in the work place as Generations X and Y inherit leadership roles once held by retiring Baby Boomers. Guided by a different set of values than Boomers, Gen X and Y will likely redefine leadership in years to come.