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Curate or be curated: 5 laws for the Content Curation Economy

Curate or be curated: 5 laws for the Content Curation Economy | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it

Curate or be curated — that’s the new face of digital content in the always-on world.


Via Robin Good, Guillaume Decugis
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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:09 PM

Makes sense to me.

Julie Groom's curator insight, October 23, 2013 4:48 AM

Curating - how to manage it. And curation experts already exist - they're called Librarians!

John Thomas's curator insight, February 9, 2014 12:29 PM
The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum
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Curate or be curated: 5 laws for the Content Curation Economy

Curate or be curated: 5 laws for the Content Curation Economy | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it

Curate or be curated — that’s the new face of digital content in the always-on world.


Via Robin Good, Guillaume Decugis
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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:09 PM

Makes sense to me.

Julie Groom's curator insight, October 23, 2013 4:48 AM

Curating - how to manage it. And curation experts already exist - they're called Librarians!

John Thomas's curator insight, February 9, 2014 12:29 PM
The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum
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Health insurance: What you need to know about open enrollment season

Health insurance: What you need to know about open enrollment season | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Most consumers who have access to employer-backed health care will be making choices about their health plans in October and November, and the landscape isn't getting any easier to navigate.
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How HIPAA impacts healthcare investments

How HIPAA impacts healthcare investments | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Potential health IT investors must carefully assess the HIPAA compliance readiness of business associates, according to Tony Kong, director of the healthcare practice at West Monroe Partners management and technology consulting firm.
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Business education shifting gears - gulfnews.com

Business education shifting gears - gulfnews.com | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
gulfnews.com
Business education shifting gears
gulfnews.com
It is well known now that MBAs today need to develop cultural intelligence, specifically a better understanding of universal practices, strategies, and behaviors.
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Thomson Reuters adds Cortellis Clinical Trials Intelligence for drug discovery ... - News-Medical.net

Thomson Reuters adds Cortellis Clinical Trials Intelligence for drug discovery ... - News-Medical.net | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Thomson Reuters adds Cortellis Clinical Trials Intelligence for drug discovery ...
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Rescooped by danijela pavlic from Social Media and Healthcare
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E-patients and their hunt for health information on social media

How patients and caregivers seek health information in the digital age

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James LaCorte's curator insight, October 19, 2013 11:39 AM

Great presentation sohwing how patients are using social media as a #HealthCare resource. #SocBiz

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The Capable Strategist: How Leaders Mistake Exe...

The Capable Strategist: How Leaders Mistake Exe... | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Booz & Company senior partner Ken Favaro explains to s+b executive editor Paul Michelman that when leaders substitute visions, missions, purposes, plans, or goals for the real work of strategy, they send their firms adrift.
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Strategic Planner can now suggest companies to follow

Strategic Planner can now suggest companies to follow | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
We just updated our platform with a couple new features. The big one is a brand new auto-suggest that allows you to discover other companies to follow based on the information we are gathering.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Maryville University breaks ground on nursing school - St. Louis Business Journal (blog)

Maryville University breaks ground on nursing school - St. Louis Business Journal (blog) | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Maryville University breaks ground on nursing school
St. Louis Business Journal (blog)
That includes the school's nursing, music therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy and rehabilitation services programs.
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SQL Business Intelligence Developer - Birmingham - IT & Telecoms

SQL Business Intelligence Developer In this exciting role and environment, you will help implement complex solutions for a self-service reporting envi ...
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Maryville University breaks ground on nursing school - St. Louis Business Journal (blog)

Maryville University breaks ground on nursing school - St. Louis Business Journal (blog) | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Maryville University breaks ground on nursing school
St. Louis Business Journal (blog)
That includes the school's nursing, music therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy and rehabilitation services programs.
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IBM's Watson uses Jeopardy skills to become House-like medical diagnostician

IBM's Watson uses Jeopardy skills to become House-like medical diagnostician | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it

IBM's Watson hasn't been in medical school long, but he already has two jobs. Teaming with the Cleveland Clinic, Big Blue researchers have developed WatsonPaths, a diagnosis and education project, and Watson EMR Assistant, a tool for delving deep into medical records.

 

WatsonPaths is the more ambitious of the two, drawing on question-answering skills acquired from its Jeopardy days to examine medical cases from all angles. It'll gather data from journals, texts and on-the-job training, helping doctors improve differential diagnoses and create better treatments. When first deployed, WatsonPaths will be used as a classroom training tool after physicians have decided what's wrong with a patient, but doctors can already see its real-world potential as a clinician.

 

Researchers are also taking advantage of Watson's natural language talents to scour medical records with the Watson EMR Assistant project. The goal is to analyze unstructured patient records -- which can easily pass 100MB over a patient's lifetime -- with "a deep semantic understanding of the content."

 

That'll take a lot of the grunt work out of parsing such data, letting physicians more easily see the relationship between clinical concerns, lab results and medications in order to provide better care. Despite all that prowess, Watson will mostly remain a learning tool and research project pending further development at the clinic. If the researchers are thinking primary care, however, they may want to bump its people skills.

 

more at: http://www.engadget.com/2013/10/15/ibm-watson-medical-diagnosis/


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Why content curation is a new form of communication

While the history of communication until the end of the previous century has only been focusing on enlarging the distribution to a few published or broadcasted content creators, we now live in information overload where content curators can be the new super heroes.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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John Thomas's curator insight, February 9, 2014 8:47 AM

Why content curation is a new form of communication

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:47 PM

Curaduría de contenidos.

Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 1, 2014 2:05 AM

Welcome to Investors Europe Mauritius Stock Brokers

@investorseurope Online Trading Paradigm

@offshorebroker Nominee Trading Accounts
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/managing-director ;
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/nominee-accounts

Download Offshore Trading DEMO: http://www.investorseurope.net/offshoretraderdemo.html

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Senior Specialist - Business Intelligence ( SAP BW / BI, BO, ASAP )

Senior Specialist - Business Intelligence ( SAP BW / BI, BO, ASAP ) | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Bangalore, India (Senior Specialist - Business Intelligence ( SAP BW / BI, BO, ASAP ) http://t.co/YOriKNqSXq #job)
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Digital Marketing for the New Health Insurance Exchanges

Digital Marketing for the New Health Insurance Exchanges | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Health insurance companies can capitalize on new marketing opportunities in light of the new health insurance exchanges.
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Free Healthcare & Gov't Subsidized Housing Discussion

Visit My Website & Shop http://survivalstory.org/ SUBSCRIBE TO MY OTHER CHANNELS George4Title2 http://www.youtube.com/user/george4vlogging George4Title7 http...
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Why Does the U.S. Overspend on Health Care? One Simple Reason - DailyFinance

Why Does the U.S. Overspend on Health Care? One Simple Reason - DailyFinance | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Why Does the U.S. Overspend on Health Care?
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5 Ways Technology Is Changing Personalized Medicine

5 Ways Technology Is Changing Personalized Medicine | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
In today’s doctor’s office, when a physician diagnoses a patient, a number of tests are consulted and the best possible course of treatment is prescribed. Unfortunately there is often limited data that allows the doctor to tailor and customize treatment specifically to a patient's biology and lifestyle. But there are five ways technology will change that over the next decade, bringing personalized medicine to fruition. 1) Correlations and Data Science. As consumers we first realized the power of correlation with e-commerce. Amazon's "people like you also bought" feature introduced algorithms to look at our online buying profile and match us to others so we could easily find new products we might enjoy. These commerce algorithms are in fact the foundational technology for creating medical algorithms to segment populations for clinical trials. Ultimately, physicians will use biomarkers and genetics to correlate a patient to a population "like him" and thus match him to the most efficacious treatment. At the current moment, a handful of diseases with simple and direct markers have been found, but the power of correlation will truly come to fruition in approaches like those used by researchers Nigam Shaw and Russ Altman, who have been able to use data mining to identify potential rare side effects and segment the population into those at risk of experiencing those side effects. By understanding a person’s biology and how he will react to a particular therapy, researchers will be able to develop more targeted and effective treatment options and physicians will more accurately prescribe those treatments.  2) Advancing Clinical Utility of Genomics. Obtaining sequencing data has gotten faster and less expensive, but bottlenecks exist not just in regulatory process but also in correlating DNA sequence with clinical outcomes. Great examples of sequences with clinical utility exist, such as BRCA1, BRCA2 in breast cancer or the CFTR gene for cystic fibrosis. A key driver for the future is advancement of clinical utility for other genes with advances in the bioinformatics pipelines and data management. Major players in sequencing technologies are already offering data analysis and data storage cloud services in addition to just the instrumentation. New technologies that break the bottleneck in analysis and drive clinical utility of additional genes will be crucial to advancing the translation of sequencing to the clinic. 3) "Datafication" of Tissue. To date, much of the buzz in personalized medicine has been focused on the increasing possibility to easily extract data from DNA. The reality is that diagnoses today and in the future will be made of multiple types of diagnostic data. It will be essential for scientists and clinicians to be able to mine not just DNA, but also extract quantifiable data from images. At Definiens, we've termed the datafication of tissue images and its correlation with clinical outcomes “phenomics”. Although genomic data can give clues to the ideal therapy, tissue images typically are more highly correlated to stage and presentation of disease, making the correlation of both types of data essential to the future of personalized medicine.  4) Telemedicine and Biosensors. At September's TedMed, Eric Topol dazzled audiences by using a cell phone to remotely monitor vital signs. While the term personalized medicine originally applied to tailored therapies, many like Topol believe that personalized medicine will also entail the use of devices and sensors for physicians to continuously monitor their patients remotely and tailor treatments on the go. Today's sensors are as small as a dime, but advances in nanotechnology could shrink sensors to allow for implantation in the body. With this miniaturization, you can imagine a day in which not only could glucose levels be monitored effortlessly in diabetics, but biomarkers of response to prescribed treatments could be continuously monitored via small sensors to alert physicians if threshold levels were reached. 5) Engineering Cells and Printing Organs. Within the next few decades, 3D printing will come to medicine. With over ninety thousand Americans awaiting organs, nothing will become more personal than the ability to "print" an organ from your own cells. Regenerative medicine pioneer Tony Atala has already printed the first 3-D kidneys and San Diego-based start-up Organovo is working on the 3-D printing of a liver. Initially 3-D tissue prints will be used as models for drug action and safety, but many believe that in 10-15 years 3D printing will enable tissue and organ construction from cells harvested from the patient, providing the ability to produce custom and personalized organs on demand. Scooped From: http://www.bio-itworld.com/2013/10/18/5-ways-technology-is-changing-personalized-medicine.html
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poojarajput's curator insight, October 19, 2013 9:07 AM

http://www.jagran.com/lifestyle/technology-news-hindi.html

Mrs. Doughty/Lineburg's curator insight, November 11, 2014 5:36 PM

Interesting article about how technology is changing medicine. After reading this article research one of the technologies that was mentioned in the article in more depth. How is the technology you researched changing the health care field and the experience of the patient? Discuss.

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Wisdom of Crowds Business Intelligence Emerging Technologies Report Now ... - Broadway World

Wisdom of Crowds Business Intelligence Emerging Technologies Report Now ... - Broadway World | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Wisdom of Crowds Business Intelligence Emerging Technologies Report Now ...
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Competitive intelligence just got easy: thank you Saas

Competitive intelligence just got easy: thank you Saas | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it

More recently, we have seen the rise of Software as a Service, or SaaS, where the application is hosted by a vendor and the data may be accessed from anywhere. Companies no longer need expensive datacenters. Industrial designers do not need to purchase pricey new systems every few years – the application evolves continually on the back end.  Accounting, once a core in-house department of every business, is now outsourced to a dedicated provider for a monthly subscription fee. And SaaS has introduced new methods to gather and analyze competitive intelligence. Here’s how.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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4 Questions to Ask About Your Next Business Intelligence Project

4 Questions to Ask About Your Next Business Intelligence Project | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
The goal of Business Analytics and Intelligence software is to help businesses access and analyze data and communicate analytics and metrics.
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More doctors, nurses becoming hospital administrators | Business | Star-Telegram.com

More doctors, nurses becoming hospital administrators | Business | Star-Telegram.com | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Employing adminstrators with medical experience puts hospitals in a stronger position to make decisions in an evolving health care industry with tighter dollars.
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Health Improvement and Innovation Resource Centre

Health Improvement and Innovation Resource Centre | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
#Health Improvement & #Innovation Resource Centre - a portal for healthcare innovn activity in New Zealand http://t.co/PSvtGr72mG #SciPath13
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Professor recognized for nursing commitment - Vidette Online

Professor recognized for nursing commitment - Vidette Online | Intelligence officer | Scoop.it
Vidette Online Professor recognized for nursing commitment Vidette Online Teresa Valerio, assistant professor in nursing, received the 2013 Marie Lindsey Spirit of Advanced Practice Nursing Award from the Illinois Society for Advanced Practice...
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