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Rescooped by Jean-Michel Livowsky from Influence et contagion
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How Videos Go #Viral part | / #metrics #SNA #contagion

How Videos Go #Viral part | / #metrics #SNA #contagion | Intelligence | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, September 26, 2014 9:38 AM

This is a big post with a lot of variables and data. So let’s recap on what we’re saying overall. How do viral videos spread socially?

We can see there are 2 broad patterns of content diffusion. One model we call “spike” – the sudden ‘explosion’ of sharing activity – and the other we call “growth”, where popularity is a slower and steadier grower.  The metrics we’ve discussed, such as velocity, variability and social currency, provide a way to identify which kind of virality you’re looking:

 

 

http://www.facegroup.com/blog/how-videos-go-viral.html

Rescooped by Jean-Michel Livowsky from Influence et contagion
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A taxonomy of #clustering procedures | #datascience


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Rescooped by Jean-Michel Livowsky from Influence et contagion
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Time varying networks and the weakness of strong ties | #patterns #rumor #SNA

Time varying networks and the weakness of strong ties | #patterns #rumor #SNA | Intelligence | Scoop.it

In most social and information systems the activity of agents generates rapidly evolving time-varying networks. The temporal variation in networks' connectivity patterns and the ongoing dynamic processes are usually coupled in ways that still challenge our mathematical or computational modelling. Here we analyse a mobile call dataset and find a simple statistical law that characterize the temporal evolution of users' egocentric networks. We encode this observation in a reinforcement process defining a time-varying network model that exhibits the emergence of strong and weak ties. We study the effect of time-varying and heterogeneous interactions on the classic rumour spreading model in both synthetic, and real-world networks. We observe that strong ties severely inhibit information diffusion by confining the spreading process among agents with recurrent communication patterns. This provides the counterintuitive evidence that strong ties may have a negative role in the spreading of information across networks.


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Rescooped by Jean-Michel Livowsky from Influence et contagion
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Strongly Connected Component | #SNA #datascience

Strongly Connected Component | #SNA #datascience | Intelligence | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, September 15, 2014 12:48 PM

Graph connectivity is of special interest in networking, search, shortest path and many other applications.

 

Strongly connected directed graph has a path from all vertices to all vertices.

 

Strongly connected components (SCC) are the strongly connected subgraphs.

 

 - abe, fg, cd and h are the strongly connected subgraphs of G.

 

 

Rescooped by Jean-Michel Livowsky from Influence et contagion
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The evolution of #memes on Facebook | #SNA #contagion

The evolution of #memes on Facebook | #SNA #contagion | Intelligence | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, June 22, 2014 10:36 AM

A meme is an idea that is readily transmitted from person to person. But we humans are not perfect transmitters. While sometimes we repeat the idea exactly, often we change the meme, either unintentionally, or to embellish or improve it. 

 

Take for example, the meme: 

“No one should die because they cannot afford health care, and no one should go broke because they get sick. If you agree, post this as your status for the rest of the day”. 

 

In September of 2009, over 470,000 Facebook users posted this exact statement as their status update. At some point someone created a variant by prepending "thinks that'' (which would follow the individual's name, e.g., “Sam thinks that no one…”), which was copied 60,000 times. The third most popular variant inserted "We are only as strong as the weakest among us'' in the middle. “The rest of the day” at one point (probably in the late evening hours) became “the next 24 hours”. Others abbreviated it to “24 hrs”, or extended it to “the rest of the week”.

 

 

Modeling memes as genes

 

So can memes really be modeled as genes? After all, Richard Dawkins originally coined the word "meme” to draw the analogy to genes when describing how ideas or messages replicate and evolve[1]. How would one test the hypothesis that memes undergo a process akin to biological evolution? First, tracing biological evolution is notoriously difficult because one must discern the lineage of specific genetic sequences through generations, without having the genetic sequence of many intermediate instances. But when studying Facebook memes, we have a very unique opportunity* to actually trace when copies and mutations occurred, and these are the two basic ingredients in the evolutionary process.