INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL
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INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL
La RED de conocimientos compartidos a través de las nuevas TICs
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15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas

15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas | INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL | Scoop.it

"It just might be that in a society where information is abundant, thinking habits are more important than knowledge. Somewhere beneath wisdom and above the “things” a student knows.

Laws of economics say that scarcity increases value. It’s no longer information that’s scarce, but rather meaningful response to that information. Thought.

And thought has a source–a complex set of processes, background knowledge, and schema that we can, as educators think of as cognitive habits. And if they’re habits, well, that means they’re probably something we can practice at, doesn’t it?"


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 8, 2014 10:09 PM

We want our students to demonstrate that they know how to think, to understand that they have the ability to ask questions and find answers, answers that may not be available through Google (esp. if we are asking them to research). In short, we want them to use metacognitive skills.

But how do we teach them these skils? The image above, from teachthought, provides 15 questions that may help students create the habits that students need to learn. Below are three of the questions. Click through to the post for the entire list, as well as some great discussion.

* Is this idea important to me? To others? Why or why not?

* Is there a “part” of this new idea I can take and “pivot”? Create something new and fresh?

* What real-world models–examples–relate to this that can help me understand this further?

Consider posting these questions in your classroom and using them when appropriate with students.

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:50 PM

Thinking and questioning, the more the better. Engaging with new information and building curiosity.

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15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas

15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas | INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL | Scoop.it

"It just might be that in a society where information is abundant, thinking habits are more important than knowledge. Somewhere beneath wisdom and above the “things” a student knows.

Laws of economics say that scarcity increases value. It’s no longer information that’s scarce, but rather meaningful response to that information. Thought.

And thought has a source–a complex set of processes, background knowledge, and schema that we can, as educators think of as cognitive habits. And if they’re habits, well, that means they’re probably something we can practice at, doesn’t it?"


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 8, 2014 10:09 PM

We want our students to demonstrate that they know how to think, to understand that they have the ability to ask questions and find answers, answers that may not be available through Google (esp. if we are asking them to research). In short, we want them to use metacognitive skills.

But how do we teach them these skils? The image above, from teachthought, provides 15 questions that may help students create the habits that students need to learn. Below are three of the questions. Click through to the post for the entire list, as well as some great discussion.

* Is this idea important to me? To others? Why or why not?

* Is there a “part” of this new idea I can take and “pivot”? Create something new and fresh?

* What real-world models–examples–relate to this that can help me understand this further?

Consider posting these questions in your classroom and using them when appropriate with students.

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:50 PM

Thinking and questioning, the more the better. Engaging with new information and building curiosity.

Rescooped by Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS from Eclectic Technology
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S.A.S.S.Y. SAMR: Toolkit for Educators to Transform Instruction

S.A.S.S.Y. SAMR: Toolkit for Educators to Transform Instruction | INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL | Scoop.it
S: STUDENTS and StorytellingA: Awesome ASSESSMENT (Teacher-Driven and Student-Driven)S: SOCIAL (Voice and Collaboration)S: SEEK: Research and Visualization (Finding it, Citing it, and Displaying it)Y: YOU: Think about Your Own Thinking…
Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:18 PM

This infographic has many ThingLinked activities and resources. To get to them click through to the post. The infographic includes five pieces of support material, including over 60 SAMR examples and resources. There are also four questions that may help you determine if the technology is an enhancement or transformative. One is below.

* Does the technology/tool allow for collaboration (e.g. within a school, district, state, nation, globe, experts, PLN)?

This post is chock full of information as well as introducing the new acronym SASSY (see infographic above).

Ruby Day's curator insight, February 14, 2014 3:54 PM

Useful resources for programme design

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15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas

15 Questions To Help Students Respond To New Ideas | INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL | Scoop.it

"It just might be that in a society where information is abundant, thinking habits are more important than knowledge. Somewhere beneath wisdom and above the “things” a student knows.

Laws of economics say that scarcity increases value. It’s no longer information that’s scarce, but rather meaningful response to that information. Thought.

And thought has a source–a complex set of processes, background knowledge, and schema that we can, as educators think of as cognitive habits. And if they’re habits, well, that means they’re probably something we can practice at, doesn’t it?"


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 8, 2014 10:09 PM

We want our students to demonstrate that they know how to think, to understand that they have the ability to ask questions and find answers, answers that may not be available through Google (esp. if we are asking them to research). In short, we want them to use metacognitive skills.

But how do we teach them these skils? The image above, from teachthought, provides 15 questions that may help students create the habits that students need to learn. Below are three of the questions. Click through to the post for the entire list, as well as some great discussion.

* Is this idea important to me? To others? Why or why not?

* Is there a “part” of this new idea I can take and “pivot”? Create something new and fresh?

* What real-world models–examples–relate to this that can help me understand this further?

Consider posting these questions in your classroom and using them when appropriate with students.

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:50 PM

Thinking and questioning, the more the better. Engaging with new information and building curiosity.

Rescooped by Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

30 Ways to Inspire Divergent Thinking - InformED

30 Ways to Inspire Divergent Thinking - InformED | INTELIGENCIA GLOBAL | Scoop.it

"When we stop talking about creativity and innovation in abstract terms and start thinking about how they originate, we get divergent thinking. Divergent thinking is more than thinking outside the box; it’s thinking without the box, and imposing structure later."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 9, 2014 8:13 PM

Why is divergent thinking important in education, and how can we inspire our students to become divergent thinkers? This post explores this idea, beginning with a definition of divergent thinking and providing a look at current research on divergent thinking.

Did you know that divergent thinking "stems from logical, unbiased thinking" or that divergent thinking "leads to positive mood swings while convergent thinking leads to negative mood swings." After this discussion (and there is much more in the post) you will find 30 tips on how to teach your students to become divergent thinkers. A few of the tips are below.

* Fast, frequent failures (with the suggestion that students quickly lay out all possible solutions). Identifying mistakes helps to lead to the students to the correct solution.

* Google - Today students like to Google the answer...but what if you create questions that require deeper thinking, where Google will not supply an answer quickly.

Many more ideas are available in the post. Click through to read more.

Si Hua's curator insight, June 10, 2014 3:54 AM

Cool Idea!