Integrated Supply Chain Management
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Supply Chain Visibility and Segmentation: Control Tower Approach

Supply Chain Visibility and Segmentation: Control Tower Approach | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
David Blinick's insight:

Bob Heaney, as usual, is at the vanguard of analysis of the requirements leading to excellence in the supply chain.  Once again the importance of visibility and coordination is stressed, as it necessarily must be.

 

The issue of complexity within the supply the chain must be considered in conjunction with resulting complexity in systems to manage the supply chain requirements.

 

The trick for all but the largest organizations to successfully address the control tower approach, in my mind, is to simplify something along the way.  However, it is always necessary to remember one of the elements that is stressed in this study:  that you must be able to work at SKU level across the extended supply chains (product, financial, and information).

 

It is always interesting to see where Aberdeen and Bob Heaney's research leads.

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7 Elements of Seamless Supply Chain Integration

7 Elements of Seamless Supply Chain Integration | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
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Everything You Need to Know About RIM Is in This Post

Everything You Need to Know About RIM Is in This Post | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
Not by me, but posted by a RIM engineer in a comment some years ago:You guys could have avoided this entire conversation by just defining what Apple created as something more than a smartphone. What
David Blinick's insight:

This article is really about disruption and how industry titans and the consultancy crowd can get things really wrong.

 

There was no guarantee at the outset of the development that the I-phone would work; however, it was a different perspective and attitude and a willingness to take the risk, that radically changed things.

 

Similar things are happening across the industrial and design spectrum. Traditional views and "common" knowledge are at risk of being wrong.  Things that were not possible yesterday, become standard today.  Different approaches and different organizational concepts take hold and succeed beyond any reasonable expectation.  I suggest WalMart as an glaring example of what can happen.

 

Traditional approaches within the supply chain are dated and can benefit from fresh thinking.  Testing and experimenting, research and development, are concepts that should be transferred into the fabric of supply chain improvement, up and down and across the supply chain activity set.  The concepts related to improvement need to transfuse all elements of the supply chain.  There is big money to be had and signifcant benefits to be realized.  This can be done by organizations whether large or small.  The key is not to be constrained by narrow and group think.

 

 

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Supply Chain Comment: Lean and Six Sigma with Best Practice Workflow Processes

Supply Chain Comment: Lean and Six Sigma with Best Practice Workflow Processes | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
Using Lean and Six Sigma Approaches Enable a Company to Streamline Processes and Reduce Operating Inefficiencies
David Blinick's insight:

Future state versus current practices is the dilemma facing decision makers and implementers. One of the main issues is getting to value as quickly and as inexpensively as possible.  This implies clear objectives and goals, and an understanding of the differernt benefits that can accrue over time so that decisions at the margin can be intelligently made.  Quick and continuing wins make for an easier implementation and a much happier user community.

 

A practical problem that must be understood is that over the short run organizations have real issues dealing with both process change and application change.  

 

''Current practices and state" to "future state" require thought relating to:  

-what are the benefits (explicit)

-what are the constraints (explicit)

-over what period of time (is it realistic)

-what is the organization's ability to handle change 

-who is in charge

-how is this to be managed and accomplished (how to get from here to there)

-how are deviations to be addressed

-what contingencies are in place for unforeseen issues and challenges

-what is the mechanism for dispute identification and resolution

-how committed is the team to achieving the objective; is there team spirit and good will?

 

Best practices are most likely to be best; but only if they can be realistically achieved.  Always, always, be realistic.

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Supply Chain Council's curator insight, September 30, 2013 10:02 AM

Learn about SCOR convergence with Lean and Six Sigma at http://supply-chain.org/sl6s

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The Top Two Reasons Supply Chain Technology Projects Fail

The Top Two Reasons Supply Chain Technology Projects Fail | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
Why do supply chain technology projects fail? Often it's because supply chain leaders aren't well versed in managing change, says one expert.
David Blinick's insight:

One particularly painful project I worked on failed at the implementation stage due to feuding between the project manager and his immediate supervisor, who entered the design/develop process late in the validation phase.

 

The project manager and his superior started to feud with both taking childish and non-professional stances.  As a result, personality won out and the project never got fully implemented, leaving very substantial benefits and lost costs on the shelf.

 

As an outside service provider we were powerless to have any ameliorating effects; even worse, our credibility was damaged with the supervisor, who refused to see his responsibility or take any responsibility for the mess.

 

Supply chains are complicated.  Supply chain management systems are both intricate and complex.  Effecting change, either in process or with systems is very hard.  Without the expertise in the underlying processes and systems, and without the understanding of roles and responsibilities up, down, and across the supply chain, both internally and externally, successfully managing a meaningful change in supply chain processes is a risky proposition where the noted failure rate is only too likely.

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Lessons Learned - Mistakes Repeated Vol.1

Lessons Learned - Mistakes Repeated Vol.1 | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
Re-Learning how to manage resources where there are fewer employees and more consultants/contractors (C/C). Every Project closure needs a time for les...
David Blinick's insight:

Complex processes in a dynamic environment require:

a) deep domain understanding

b) continuity

c) flexibility of approach

d) an ability to accept a lack of clarity at the outset, and

e) acceptance of "ignorance" as a significant outset condition

 

The experienced and capable consultant brings this perspective to the table and provides the client organization with this benefit, something they are often hard-pressed to appreciate.

 

Lack of appreciation of the details of the constituent elements and an unwillingness to allow the project to find its feet, often lead to repeated failures and poor results. 

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7 Fallacies of Supply Chain Process Redesign

7 Fallacies of Supply Chain Process Redesign | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it

Supply chain is the integrated business process from point of origin to point of consumption. To enhance overall capabilities, supply chain process redesign is a very important initiative. This article will show you how the concept of process redesign evolves and things you should avoid when you embark of this type of project.


Via Supply Chain Council
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Why Your IT Project May Be Riskier Than You Think

Why Your IT Project May Be Riskier Than You Think | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
David Blinick's insight:

Doing implementations of any size or complexity is very hard.  There are many points and reasons  where and why the project can go off plan.  Having been involved in many different supply chain design/build and develop projects, many requiring a considerable amount of integration across a broad range of functionalities, others requiring functionality that needed to be invented from scratch, the likelihood of failure (or of significant under-performance) in these kind of situations can be much greater than anyone would like to consider.

 

What is required to minimize the risks, in my opinion:

a)  extreme knowledge across the functional sets

b)  very good inter-personal skills of the project leader/implementer

c)  a comprehensive mental image of what the implementation is going to look like (and an ability to modify this view without sacrificing the objectives)

d)  a realistic appraisal of risk elements and personalities

e)  a ruthlessness by the lead implementer to achieve the result and not to be dissuaded by oppositional activities and behavior

f)  clear, unwavering, and unequivocal sponsorship and senior level support [something that usually fails]

g)  a willingness on the part of the organization to experiment and accept interim set-backs

h)  humility in all that is done; gratitude for any support that is received

i)  continually benchmark performance and be sanguine when there are real and significant challenges and interim failures

 

Even with this, there is no guarantee of success, but the likelihood is much improved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mitigating Risk and Leveraging Luck

Mitigating Risk and Leveraging Luck | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
Deservedly so, project management’s success has been defined in large measure by the project team’s procedural structures, sound executable actions, r...
David Blinick's insight:

GCM and Supply Chain projects are complex by their nature.  They deal with dynamic data in multiple dynamic processes.

 

The role of a capable and experienced project manager, one who understands the environment, has experience in the field, and is in a position to deal with the technology providers, is  extremely important to the possibility of a successful project.

 

The pedigree and experience of PM is a critical to successfully implementing any significant improvements within a GCM or Supply Chain process.  The PM requires an appropriate support mechanism from project sponsors and managers.

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Integration is a Core Competency for High Performing Supply Chains - Chris Jones on Best Practices

Integration is a Core Competency for High Performing Supply Chains - Chris Jones on Best Practices | Integrated Supply Chain Management | Scoop.it
High performing supply chains view integration as an enabler of greater agility and higher levels of business performance, not as a means to an end.
David Blinick's insight:

Integration, to a great extent, can't be added on (easily).  It needs to be designed in, kind of like quality.

 

Back in the 1980s, when we first began designing our supply chain software applications, we presented a four circles approach to development: (1)  operations/production, (2) supervision/visibility, (3) managerial/corporate/enterprise.  Each prior circle was included within the next layer (essentially an included set).   The foundation underlying all three layers (the inner circle) was the integration layer.  As each circle/layer had its own complexity and activity segments which were necessary to incorporate into the activities and control elements of the next layer around it, integration at the center provided the consistency and linkages that allowed each of the outer/derivative layers to better work.

 

Today, of course, the theoretical model has become more complex as organizations now must reach outside themselves and coordinate and control activity that modifies and is incorporated into their business processes.  Our original model was about data interactivity and not about process control.  Today, it is impossible to do a serious enterprise application without consideration of externalities and coordination effects.

 

This article is a very good expression of my views and the extensive experience across many different organizations and business types.

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Supply Chain Insights Global Summit 2013 - Supply Chain Excellence ...

What Is Supply Chain Excellence? What can we learn? What does it mean? Why should you care? Who did it best? How does supply chain performance effect corporate
David Blinick's insight:

This is a very interesting overview of how to gain control of a complex supply chain through the use of metrics.  There are many different metrics and relationships examined in this most compelling presentation.

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How Well Do You Sustain and Integrate Your Improvement Efforts to Drive Supply Chain Excellence?

Presented at 

SCC Mexico and Central America Regional Conference 2013 

by 

Carl Loubser

TRACC

VP Supply Chain,

Competitive Capabilities International


Via Supply Chain Council
David Blinick's insight:

Supply Chain improvement, to be meaningful, will not be easy.  Requiring an approach to the technique, the technical, and all the input factors, it requires an ability to deal with multi-faceted problems which are dynamically reacting over a short timeframe, a complex physical system that is undergoing continuous and discontinuous change.  Underneath the ability to control lies the ability to integrate and view (achieving a multiple perspective capability) to support timely reaction and prediction.  What is clear from these presentations, is that improvement requires a programmed and dedicated approach.

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