Integrated Brand Communications
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Integrated Brand Communications
Focuses on branding and the role of communication methods such as advertising, events, sponsorships, content marketing and social media.
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Aligning SEO With a Company\'s Overall Brand Strategy

Aligning SEO With a Company\'s Overall Brand Strategy | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it
The SEO must start thinking like the people who need convincing - the discussions need to be less about the SEO value of a tactic and more about how those tactics support other marketing efforts.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Six steps for bridging the gaps.

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Content marketing: Gearing up towards content success | Special Reports | Marketing Week

Content marketing: Gearing up towards content success | Special Reports | Marketing Week | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

A quarter of all content consumed has been produced by organisations as a way to add value to their customer relationships, and Mintel predicts double-digit growth for content marketing in the next five years.

But it is not only the quality of what a brand creates - whether it is a video, website, magazine or app - that is important. Getting lots of the right people to view or use it is equally important.

 

Investment in the distribution and promotion of video content is as important as the creation and production in delivering reach - and our stats back this up,” says Kevin Sutherland, strategy director at branded content publisher Seven, which works with clients including Virgin and Sainsbury’s. “A video that has been supported with TrueView ad formats [where viewers choose which ads to watch] on YouTube can deliver 25 to 30 times the audience of unsupported video,” he claims.

 

In short, promoting content is about using both paid and earned media to complement each other and achieve reach. That said, Sean Collings, founder of Engage Publishing, says it is not just about achieving a huge audience. “It’s about ongoing engagement with the right audience. A common problem is that brands go for the maximum number of hits or views for example, but is it from the right people? Brands need to build a relationship by being in the right places, not just aim to get exposure.”

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Makes a case for knowing how well content affects "influencers" through visibility and use. In other words is it "engaging" psychologically and behaviorally.

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Content Marketing Infographic - The Anatomy of Content Marketing

Content Marketing Infographic - The Anatomy of Content Marketing | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it
The Anatomy of Content Marketing Infographic explains what makes for good content marketing. Check out the content marketing infographic.
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5 Customer-Focused Questions To Guide Your Content Marketing - Forbes

5 Customer-Focused Questions To Guide Your Content Marketing - Forbes | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it
Content marketing is growing rapidly, becoming a critical part of modern marketing. To help you develop a successful strategy, I talked with Todd Lebo, who ran marketing for the uber-well-known marketing powerhouse, MarketingSherpa.com, to get his insight into this growing content marketing trend.
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How to Run a Content Marketing Campaign with Zero Budget

How to Run a Content Marketing Campaign with Zero Budget | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Picture the scene – you’re an innovative marketer working for a company that is stuck in the past.

 

They have a website but they’ve never really paid much attention to SEO and they’re certainly not going to give you any money to engage in this newfangled “content marketing” the kids are talking about.

 

What do you do?

 

Well, believe it or not, it’s actually perfectly feasible to run a (basic) content marketing campaign on zero budget.

 

Don’t expect the results to be earth-shattering and remember you will need access to a strong writer to get the great guest posting spots that will form the backbone of your efforts.

 

However, with these five free tools you will be able to run a shoestring campaign that will demonstrate proof of concept to those holding the purse strings, allowing you to make a strong pitch for the kind of budget you deserve.

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Organizing For Content

Organizing For Content | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

How should organizations organize for content? Are brands really publishers? Very few have hired people with “content” or “editor” in their titles. Fewer still (read: almost none) have content departments or divisions within the marketing or other organizations.

 

Yet, more and more companies are producing content like crazy. Also, multiple websites. Large corporations have tens of millions of visitors to their dot-coms each month, perhaps 5-10 million email subscribers. Then, there are blogs, YouTube channels and multiple social media channels on social networks.

 

Like journalists, brands are challenged to “feed the beast,” often on a daily basis, sometimes in real time. All this content isn’t just written word. It’s images, videos, charts, infographics… Put all of this together and the process, workload, and workflow demands become truly staggering.

 

Yet, most companies have adopted content strategies that amount to little more than asking employees already juggling the demands of full-time jobs to please produce content, too, in addition to their day-to-day duties. Not only does this approach not scale, but these employees aren’t trained in either content marketing or content strategy.

 

If you’re producing content, start asking yourself these 36 questions in 11 areas to assess your organizational style. 

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Nat Sones's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:02 AM

Doesn't matter whether content's information, experience or a new name for your pet. What matters is how you organise to gather, channel and distribute it. Wonderful article. 

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Data-Rich and Insight-Poor [Infographic]

Data-Rich and Insight-Poor [Infographic] | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

As more and more consumer data becomes available, companies are struggling to  rise above the deluge of information.

 

To find out how marketers are handling the flood of data and what they plan  to do with that data, Infogroup  Targeting Solutions and Yesmail  Interactive sponsored a study that surveyed 700 attendees at the  DMA2012 and Forrester Research eBusiness conferences.

 

They then shared their findings in a report and produced an  infographic. Among the findings:

68% of marketers said they plan to increase data spending.56% said they plan to hire employees for data positions.45% said analyzing or applying data will be their biggest challenge.

And regarding the use of real-time data, 53% of businesses said they plan to  make greater use of it, and 19% said they are starting to consider it.

Check out the infographic for more details:

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Raw data isn't worth much until it has been refined by applying analytic algorithms that can extract knowledge from it. It's like trying to run your car on crude.

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Why Every Brand Needs a Visual Story | The Agency Post

Why Every Brand Needs a Visual Story | The Agency Post | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it
Megan O'Malley explains why every brand needs to employ visual storytelling to boost their followers' engagement.

 

A few words of wisdom to young creatives: Invest in a good camera.

It’s not that a talented copywriter isn’t worth his or her weight in gold, but consumers are now gravitating toward visuals more incessantly than ever. Between the ubiquity of camera phones and the surging popularity of photo-centric social platforms, imagery has become central to digital engagement. Facebook may have reached 100 million users in four years, but it took Instagram only 10 days to attract 10 million users.

 

So why the wave of image obsession? For starters, we’re visual creatures by our very nature. Science has proven that humans assess and store perceptions quickest through visual cues. For instance, a study from 3M recently found that the human brain actually processes visuals 60,000 times faster than text.

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Norman Vaz's curator insight, March 19, 2013 4:55 AM

This article in my opinion has nailed what today's marketer’s should be looking to do in branding and marketing their products. Imagery in my opinion is key to a products success, This article is not saying that images weren’t focused on before to market a product however its saying that it has to be focused in detail now and marketed on social sites like Facebook, Instergram and Twitter which are all visual social platform's and are a big part of today’s community. As a study from "3M recently found that the human brain actually processes visuals 60,000 times faster than text". It’s the era of technology and social networking and I feel working hand in hand with it will yield a lot of success as it opens up new opportunities for advertising , so smile for the camera.

Lance Holland's comment, March 19, 2013 9:59 PM
I also like the article as it addresses where the future of IMC marketing is heading. As they say a picture is worth 1000 words. And with everyone (almost) now having a smartphone or tablet, communication and sharing of images happens everyday, many times over. It is important for marketers to see this fundamental shift as an opportunity and capitalise on it to strengthen their brand-customer relationship
Kasem Tanom's comment, March 20, 2013 7:25 PM
I agree image is key to a products success. Brand image portrays what a company is all about and having strong brand image means more consumer attentions are being captured. Technology these days such as smartphones/tablets makes it more simple for marketers to market brand image as mentioned above through social networking sites such as Facebook, twitter etc. Technology has helped marketers come up with new IMC strategies to help promote brand image.
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Meet the Gatekeepers to Twitter and Facebook Data | Digital - Advertising Age

Meet the Gatekeepers to Twitter and Facebook Data | Digital - Advertising Age | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Twitter and facebook have drastically different approaches when it comes to meting out access to the millions of conversations occurring daily on their platforms.

 

Social data is the nectar all brands want to drink, but tapping into the source can be a costly and arduous undertaking.

 

Consider Facebook and Twitter, the suppliers with the most scale to offer. They have drastically different approaches when it comes to meting out access to the millions of conversations occurring daily on their platforms. And in Twitter's case, the approach seems subject to constant change.

 

Twitter's "firehose" of tweets is already an important revenue stream for the company, and it takes a cut from sanctioned resellers that furnish raw data to enterprise customers. But it's also been looking to restrict the firehose access of existing partners. Facebook, meanwhile, has nothing resembling a firehose and keeps the majority of conversations taking place on its pages under wraps. Brands that want to know what's being said about them can use listening tools to tap into public posts that haven't been hidden by privacy settings, but no more.

 

"My standard canned response to clients is, "I can only see what Facebook lets me see, and that depends on each individual user's setting and what their API feels like giving me at the time,'" said GolinHarris Director of Insights Eric Swayne.

 

The social network has no agreements in place with data resellers, so in theory an individual who knows how to code can get just as much out of Facebook's data conduit—its Graph API—as an enterprise-level service. (API stands for application-programming interface; it's a set of rules that enables third parties to interact with platforms and services.) In practice, of course, the infrastructure that social-listening companies have built up makes them better equipped to handle the available data.

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Improving the Value of Customer Experience Analytics | Business 2 Community

Improving the Value of Customer Experience Analytics | Business 2 Community | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

It is no surprise that many businesses are taking advantage of the power of analytics. In 2010, researchers from MIT Sloan Management Review and IBM found that organizations that used business information and analytics outperformed organizations that did not. Top-performing businesses were twice as likely to use analytics to guide future strategies and guide day-to-day operations compared to their low-performing counterparts.

 

The use of analytics in business is growing and sees much support by business leaders. In a 2012 survey of 600 executives from the US and UK, Accenture found that use of predictive analytics is up threefold (33% in 2012) since 2009. They also found that 68% of the executives rated their senior management team to be highly or totally committed to analytics and fact-based decision making. Additionally, within the last 18 months, two out of three companies have appointed a senior figure (e.g., “chief data officer”) to lead data management and analytics.

 

IBM CEO Virginia Rometty said last week, when addressing the Council on Foreign Relations 2013 Corporate Conference, “Data will be the basis of competitive advantage for any organization.” She likened data as “the next natural resource.” But while everyone will have access to this natural resource, Rometty continues, “what you do with it will make the difference.” She predicts that, for business, “decisions will be based on predictive analytics and not gut extinct or experience.”

 

Analytics and Customer Experience Management

According to Accenture, businesses are applying analytics in a variety of different areas that cut across different functional areas like Finance (59%), Customer Service (55%) and Production/Operations (54%) but many with a customer focus. For example, a majority of companies said they are using analytics to improve the customer experience (60%), improve customer retention and acquisition (69%) and monitor competitor performance/activity (65%). To support these different use cases, analytics will necessarily be applied to different kinds of customer data including attitudinal data (e.g., customer satisfaction) and behavioral data (e.g., renews, purchases, clicks).

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Two reasons for a lack of value, and three areas for improving ROI of customer experience analytics.

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SEO Past and Present Infographic | Cheap SEO Service

SEO Past and Present Infographic | Cheap SEO Service | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Whether you’re a seasoned SEO pro or just starting out, the shifting nature of search engine optimization makes it a constant struggle to stay on top of it. It’s like walking on quicksand, every time you think you have sure footing, you find yourself suddenly up to your neck in it. There are ways to maintain a  cheap SEO service without sacrificing quality though, and the best method is constant vigilance…accompanied by knowledge of the past and present of course.

 

We’ve found a great Infographic from Fuzz One Media that illustrates the difference between SEO before and after all of the Penguin and Panda changes. It goes over nearly every aspect of search engine optimization, social outreach, and team construction.

 

We recommend everyone save this infographic for one BIG reason in particular though: weeding out bad SEO companies. When you’re looking to hire a company to do SEO for you, or you’re looking to hire a new employee to perform the work internally, ask them about all the different topics in the center column of this infographic. If they give the answer from the left-hand side (old) then they’re no good. If they give the answer from the right-hand side (new) then they’re worthy of your time and money.

 

Here’s the infographic:

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How to Get More Facebook Shares [Infographic]

How to Get More Facebook Shares [Infographic] | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Facebook Likes are good, but Shares are better. That's because a Share means your content is being passed around social networks and creating buzz for your business.

 

But getting your Facebook content shared isn't as simple as throwing something onto your Wall and expecting the Shares to just happen. You need to create share-worthy content. 

 

To do just that, Facebook marketing expert Mari Smith offers 14 ways to boost your content's visibility and viral sharing on Facebook—all in the following infographic by ShortStack.

 

Among the tips shared are the following:

Use eye-catching images. Rather than just putting text boxes galore on your Facebook Wall, vary the content by posting infographics, photos, and artwork.Keep it short. Increase likes, comments, and shares by keeping posts between 100 and 150 characters long.Offer value. Consider your audience when sharing content on Facebook. Ask yourself, "Will this entertain or inform my audience?"

Get more tips about increasing Facebook shares in the infographic:


Read more: http://www.marketingprofs.com/chirp/2013/10326/how-to-get-more-facebook-shares-infographic#ixzz2Nu9jFs2x

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Brand Value - A Simple Way to Identify Your Brand Benefits

Brand Value - A Simple Way to Identify Your Brand Benefits | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Brands can struggle getting beyond communicating the features they provide – which are often identical to their competitors’ features. This limitation means they never create compelling demonstrations of the benefits and brand value they can deliver.

 

In contrast, while developing my presentation on “New Product Launch Failures” for the PR Consultants Group conference recently, I rediscovered this FedEx advertisement from the late 1990s in a previous presentation. While we used the FedEx advertisement internally to communicate the importance of performance for our transportation company, the ad is also a fantastic example of a B2B brand making its brand value very clear AND very personal.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Excellent discussion about the meaning of brand value.

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Chelsea Tidswell's comment, August 21, 2013 5:57 AM
There are so many competing companies around these days that simply do the same thing but can cost less or more. It is always nice to know as a consumer, where your money is being spent and why it is that it may cost more. The companies that usually charge more are the ones who have the better service and the better advertising to make you want to use that product or service over any other.
DavidShin's comment, August 22, 2013 6:30 AM
@danielle Peterson
Competion is so extreme and one slip may determine if a consumer remains a loyal or remains a potential customer for future terms.
Charges vary depending speed and quality of a product (ofcourse aswell as quantity)
For example: Apple phones compared to NOKIA are alot more expensive however worth the same in satasfaction and desired as much if not more for its functions and capabilities of use. However saying that cheap brands can be very well in quality too!!
Services are key in distribution too!
Sheenal Prakash's comment, August 22, 2013 8:19 AM
Agreed there are certain expectation of every product because of the past experiences the consumers have with product and the build-up of the marketing communications of the product itself and the company needs to meet those expectations otherwise the consumer could be disappointed and look elsewhere to fulfill their needs.
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Seven reasons content marketing is not right for your brand

Seven reasons content marketing is not right for your brand | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

A few things have occurred in recent weeks that are clear and tangible indicators the concept of content marketing is well and truly alive in Australian business circles – if not growing in popularity and influence.

 

Firstly, one of the world’s pre-eminent content marketing conference showcases, Content Marketing World (CMW), was held in Sydney. Led by renowned US-based content marketing guru, Joe Pulizzi, CMW played to a packed house and was enthusiastically received. (Salesforce has written an excellent summary on its blog).

 

Secondly, in the lead-up to CMW, Pulizzi’s Content Marketing Institute joined forces with the Association for Data-Driven Marketing & Advertising (ADMA) to produce a report titled: Content Marketing in Australia: 2013 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends (access the full report here).

 

A couple of key takeaways from the report:

• Spending on content marketing in Australia is set to increase by 61%, with 12% of respondents saying they will be “significantly increasing” their budget this year.

• 96% of respondents use content marketing. Broken down, this is 98% for business-to-business marketers, and 89% for business-to-consumer (by comparison, this is greater than their B2B counterparts in North America, at 91% and the UK, at 95%).

It’s not surprising the use of content by companies is widespread, with Australian marketers using an average of 12 content marketing tactics, the most popular tools being:

• Articles on company website (88%);

• Social media other than blogs (83%);

• E-newsletters (82%);

• In-person events (74%;

• Case studies (71%);

• Video (69%).

 

However, while there is some definite movement on the content marketing front in Australia, we also need to differentiate between those companies that create content with little in the way of substance or purpose, and those that are producing content not only with strategic intent but also verve and passion (and believe me, you can tell).

 

The latter companies are, as a rule, led by progressive thinkers and doers – early adopters who have realised the power of infusing their social media efforts with compelling content relevant to the needs of their audience.

They are the ones that are building their platform and their brand, attracting new customers and cementing relationships with existing ones. Importantly, they have a head-start on their competitors, and good luck to them.

The issue with trends such as this one – the explosive growth of using content as a marketing strategy – means there will be companies that jump onto the bandwagon because, well, everyone else is doing it. But it’s not a good idea if your corporate heart isn’t fully into the concept.

Just because you can create your own content for distribution online doesn’t mean you should. Here are seven reasons that might be the case with your brand.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Seven self assessment guidelines a brand needs to consider before embarking on a content marketing program.

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Reuben Bisley's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:16 PM
Involves seven important ideas you should consider before choosing content marketing. It involves the idea of managing your brand. In the end though content marketing is still quite valuable for connecting with customers, right?
Richard Ott's comment, March 21, 2013 6:31 PM
I like this description from the article "the power of infusing their social media efforts with compelling content relevant to the needs of their audience." I think this really highlights the definitions we spoke about in week one and keep returning to as a key theme for IMC, the fact that alot of marketing communications are now "consumer driven". The interesting thing i feel is in the future will marketers loose control of their own brands? How do you controll a message once it has been released into the public via social media?

They are the ones that are building their platform and their brand, attracting new customers and cementing relationships with existing ones.
Lisa Pulotu's comment, May 3, 2013 4:20 AM
If implemented correctly it can be quite valuable for connecting with customers. In the article it mentions how content marketing looks at long term results, this strategy fits with the IMC process of building long term brand value. However although they may build their own platform, with social media they will never have full control over the perception viewed by the consumer.
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Interbrand Reveals the 'Best Retail Brands' of 2013 (And The Ones Losing Their Luster) - Forbes

Interbrand Reveals the 'Best Retail Brands' of 2013 (And The Ones Losing Their Luster) - Forbes | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Of course, most U.S. shoppers have heard of Best Buy, while Cabela’s, the outdoor retailer that sells everything from fishing rods to hunting boots, is likely an unfamiliar name to many. No matter.

 

While the consumer electronics chain still has brand-name recognition going for it, its relevance in the retail landscape is trickling away like sand through an hourglass, while the lesser-known Cabela’s is quietly carving a niche among lovers of the great outdoors.

 

That’s some of what Interbrand’s 2013 Best Retail Brands Report revealed.

The annual report from the brand consultancy, released today, ranks the  50 most valuable U.S. retail brands, as well as the leading store brands from around the world.

 

It also shines a spotlight on the biggest gainers this year stateside in terms of brand equity (Macy’s, Amazon), chains that are building momentum, marked by newcomers on the list, (Anthropologie, Cabela’s), as well as stores whose brand value has waned (Abercrombie & Fitch), and ones that have fallen off the list entirely (Toys “R” Us).

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Infographic: What Role Will Mobile Play in The Future of Higher Learning | Mobile Marketing Watch

Infographic: What Role Will Mobile Play in The Future of Higher Learning | Mobile Marketing Watch | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

A new infographic based on New Media Consoritum’s 12 emerging technologies to watch highlights how mobile technologies will impact the future of higher learning.

 

From smartphones to smart wearable devices, there’s a wide assortment of gadgets and corresponding features that may change how we learn in the coming years.

 

So what are the 12 technologies to look out for? Check out the new infographic below, courtesy of OnlineDegrees.org.

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James's curator insight, March 21, 2013 5:57 AM

Convenient and moneysaving, but can it really replace what has worked for years?

The digital generation can benefit from its familiarity but the increase in tech also leads to disuse of important skills such as handwriting and otherwise independent thinking and problemsolving.

Nat Sones's curator insight, March 21, 2013 8:57 AM

Higher education can't fight smartphones in the classroom any more. If you can't beat them, join them, say educators. 

Nat Sones's comment, March 21, 2013 8:58 AM
You have to use the tools of today. Does that mean you become slaves to them? Of course not. But minds are changing, just as times are. We must educate people in any way we can - and if that means (judicious) use of mobile, then so be it...at least, to me..
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The Hidden Benefits of Social Media Marketing: Why Your Strategy May Be Working Better Than You Think - Forbes

The Hidden Benefits of Social Media Marketing: Why Your Strategy May Be Working Better Than You Think - Forbes | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Most businesses venture into social media expecting to see a big return on investment. The hope is that new customers will come in droves, and that the benefits and revenue generation will be huge. However, this is rarely the case. It takes time to build momentum with social media, and the benefits aren’t always as obvious as we would like.

 

If you’re feeling a bit skeptical about social media marketing and whether or not it’s worth the effort, following are some reasons why it may be working better than you realize.

 

 

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lorren's comment, March 21, 2013 8:09 PM
i like this article because it explains how social media is not overnight success in terms of brand building. It is actually takes time to build momentum from the starting time but the eventual results of increased profits will be in the pipeline.It also points out an intresting fact about how it takes a product 8 exposures for a customer to finally buy.it gives us poetential marketers the responsinility of creating strategies that will build & become a favorite brand for our current customers and even potential customers still with competitors.The other advantages like directing traffic to your website are also quite profound.i therefore think with carefull brand building, a company will nevertheless realise the ultimate goal of increased profit.
Shaokang xie's comment, March 21, 2013 10:22 PM
This article has mention that efforts of social media needs to be consitant. I really agree with that because there are many competitors for a business in the socity, people are busy and they are not nomarlly paying attention to everything which means they may igore the promotion for a long time. Give the time to the lukers because they are the potential customers.
Vivien Dohyun Jung's comment, March 21, 2013 10:43 PM
before i read this article, i somehow thought that social media is an easy-to-use and light tool to use to shape a brand. however, as Lorren pointed out, this article made me realise that social media is actually a complicated tool that is thoroughly designed. Now I clearly understand how the power and influence of social media could have been that strong in many succesful cases.
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Branding Strategy Insider | Brands Must Get Social Media Right

Branding Strategy Insider | Brands Must Get Social Media Right | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

The rise of social media over the past decade has been extraordinary, with a profound impact on brand marketing. Yet much of the potential of social media remains unrealized and, for many brand marketers, unrecognized. In key ways, social media are misunderstood.

 

First, social media aren’t actually media. But by calling them media, brand marketers frame their thinking and planning in ways that put them at a disadvantage. It’s hard to see beyond the expectations created by the media characterization....

 

This, then, is the second thing to recognize about social media. It is all about giving people social currency to spend. Financial currency is spent in brand engagement. Social currency is spent in social engagement. This is not to suggest that financial transactions are irrelevant to social media; only that social currency must be spent first.

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Five Ways Digital Disruption Will Impact The Customer Experience - Forbes

Five Ways Digital Disruption Will Impact The Customer Experience - Forbes | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Talk to CEOs and CMOs these days and ask them what they are most concerned about, and I bet you “disruption” is somewhere in the reply.  I’ve even heard that some organizations internally ban the word “disruption,” concerned using it will instill fear and therefore, paralysis.

 

But, won’t fear and avoiding/ignoring disruption cause even more damage?

 

How will digital disruption impact your customers? Here are five key factors you need to consider:

 

Pace of innovation.

 

Increased competition.

 

Personalization of interactions.

 

Speed of interactions.

 

Integration.

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Nat Sones's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:37 AM

Thanks to Russ Merz for grabbing this; a simple (though not so simple) look at how digital will change everything in customer experience. In fact...is disrupting...

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Top 10 Content Marketing Strategy Mistakes, and How to Correct Them (Part 2 of 3)

Top 10 Content Marketing Strategy Mistakes, and How to Correct Them (Part 2 of 3) | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Editor's note: The previous installment covered three content marketing mistakes: Your content doesn't have  specific goals; your content doesn't have anything to sell; and your content  didn't bother asking for the transaction. In this installment, the author lists  and discusses four more content marketing mistakes.

4. Your content sounds like everyone else's

Am I imagining it—or does it sometimes feel as if the same blogger writes for  every blog? Word choice, metaphors, structure, cadence, they all sound the  same!

Don't be assimilated into the blogger Borg collective.

Write with vulnerability, enough that it makes you nervous to hit the publish  button.

 

5. Your content isn't based on any research

If you're not using at least Google Keyword Research before you write an article, you're  not writing for an audience, you're writing for yourself. That's not marketing,  that's journaling.

 

6. Your content uses only one media format

OK, look, we live in the future.

Bandwidth is cheap, and text and images aren't the only way to get your  message across.

 

7. Your content dresses exactly the same everywhere it  goes

You wouldn't go to a black-tie event in jeans and a T-shirt, would you? So  why try to present your content the same way everywhere you publish it?

 

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Social Analytics 101 - Loves Data Blog

Social Analytics 101 - Loves Data Blog | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it
The basics on how to track engagement & social shares in Google Analytics

It is no surprise that Social Analytics are becoming more important for many organisations considering how fast social media is evolving. In particular, this is true for social's importance as a marketing channel. This is irrespective of whether you make use of e-commerce or simply want to measure the impact of social on your brand. 

Most often the struggle is 'how do I measure the effectiveness of my social activities and initiatives?' According to Google, four elements define your impact through social: 

Network ReferralsLanding PagesConversionsSocial Plugins

The Social Reports in Google Analytics allow you to review and analyse this information. You find the Social Reports under Traffic Sources in the left navigation menu of Google Analytics. 

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Jerry W. Burt's curator insight, March 18, 2013 5:50 PM

Use as your foundation for articles, meetings, position papers, blogs, radio content. Your always in the loop.

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MediaPost Publications Subway, Google Top 'Social Currency' Ranking 03/18/2013

MediaPost Publications Subway, Google Top 'Social Currency' Ranking 03/18/2013 | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Subway, Google, Target, Heineken, Verizon and Dunkin’ Donuts took the top places in a “Social Currency Impact Ranking” from global consulting firm Vivaldi Partners.

 

Vivaldi defines social currency as the degree to which customers share a brand or information about a brand with others. The firm surveyed more than 5,000 consumers in the U.S., Germany and the U.K. (from a multimillion online panel), researching several hundred digital and social initiatives over more than 60 brands and businesses. 

 

Consumers were surveyed about brands and their perceptions of how well brands enable six social behaviors or dimensions: utility, information, conversation, advocacy, affiliation and identity. Brand performance or impact was measured on three levels of conversion: awareness to consideration, consideration to purchase/use, and purchase/use to loyalty.

 

Among Vivaldi’s overall conclusions: Achieving top scores in social currency and driving brand performance is expensive and requires continuous commitment and continuity, requiring brands to address the various dimensions of social currency and drive social buzz, large social audiences, and ultimately, engagement. 



Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/195883/subway-google-top-social-currency-ranking.html#ixzz2Nv3LsEeq

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Renee Spicer's comment, March 21, 2013 4:41 AM
I like just finding out which brands are the highest ranked. It was intersting to know that Subway, Google, Target, Heineken, Verizon and Dunkin’ Donuts were the brands which customers share a brand or information about a brand with others.

My prediction straight away is Subway was a new innovation and it is health and popular. Google has become like everyones 'bible'. Target is a good all round store to fit everyones needs at an affordable price. Heineken has amazing advertisments that captures everyones attention. I didnt know what Verizon was. And I was suprised about dunkin' donuts, as I dont see it popular here in New Zealand.

However all predictions aside this reading tells us why they are the top rank brands. Which is helpful to know why they are were they are, so other brands can strive for those qualities.
Rosie Ioane Mulipola's comment, March 21, 2013 5:33 AM
It's interesting how subway ranks number one on the six behavioural dimensions as well as impacting on their customers through consideration, purchase and loyalty. I find that their approach to customers was simple yet effective in terms that they are promoting their deals but not pushing their advertising too far which is a great idea as i myself as a consumer wouldn't like to have so many things pushed in my face. As well as Google being ranked second which i understand it to lead other brands such as Apple and Microsoft because most users do access Google to get to other networks, and as mentioned in the article it does have a big portfolio and a ecosystem of brands that people access daily such as Gmail, Google Maps, Youtube etc. I agree with Ishika on how she mentions that in keeping the consumer engaged would involve finding the right balance of advertising, entertainment and information. This balance would indeed keep the consumer attracted to the brand.
Trang Tran's comment, March 21, 2013 10:25 AM
It's good to learn that there is a name for the extent to which customers inform others about a brand which I would call it word of mouth, formally known as social currency in the article. Different forms of social currency provide brands with the opportunity to promote themselves to different audiences. Rosie and Eden are right when they say that Subway effectively advertises their products but only to a certain extent so that customers don't feel like they're being bombarding. It's about finding the right balance to cater for the business and the target market. I think that Subway, Google and Target all deserve their rankings as these brands have come a long way by integrating different social behaviours and proving their brand performance over others.
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DR4WARD: How To Increase The Twitter Engagement Of Your Brand? #infographic

DR4WARD: How To Increase The Twitter Engagement Of Your Brand? #infographic | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

How To Increase The Twitter Engagement Of Your Brand? #infographic via @LinchpinSEO 

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An introduction to Digital Media [Infographic] - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice

An introduction to Digital Media [Infographic] - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it
This Tube Map is a great way to summarise online marketing options to non digital specialists You will know from our digital media infographics and succes. Marketing topic(s):Media selection. Advice by Dave Chaffey.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Conceptual mind map of digital media---very useful.

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A Quick-and-Dirty Social Media Analysis That Won't Cost You a Dime

A Quick-and-Dirty Social Media Analysis That Won't Cost You a Dime | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Social media is full of numbers, but most of the time we don't use them in any actionable way. The reason is simple: Social metrics are often too complicated to understand, and they provide few clues on how we can improve our success.

 

The reality is that the return on social media marketing can vary widely for each business. Some companies see quick and immediate returns, while others fail to see much of anything at all. What could the problem be? And, more important, how can we be sure that our business won't fail online?

 

This article looks to answer those questions by offering a few quick-and-dirty methods for gauging your online marketing strengths and weaknesses.

 

Through the use of these basic metrics (the data for which you are in all likelihood already gathering), you can gain insight about how you are actually performing and glean some good ideas on how you can improve performance.

 

We'll start by asking three key questions, and then we'll do some basic calculations to measure our success in each area:

Are my efforts bringing traffic to my website?Is my social reach growing?Are people enjoying my content?

Remember, these are intended to be rough calculations that give us a general idea of success. They may not be perfect, but they will give you actionable insights you need to succeed online.


Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The trick will be relating the numbers to an important brand outcome. Can it be done?

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