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Integrated Brand Communications
Focuses on branding and the role of communication methods such as advertising, events, sponsorships, content marketing and social media.
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The Content Marketing Industry's 15 Biggest Milestones to Date

The Content Marketing Industry's 15 Biggest Milestones to Date | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

To mark Oracle's purchase of Compendium, we've put together a list of what we think are the 15 most significant developments that have rocked the content marketing industry over the years - from 1895 on.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A content marketing historical timeline. Some useful references here.

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Brand Strategy: A Cautionary Tale From History

Brand Strategy: A Cautionary Tale From History | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

This is a story about the impact of having no brand. Agencies undertake  extensive research for their clients on the impact of going brandless – volunteers are asked every day, around the world, if a smell, colour, taste or  shape reminds them of something in the marketplace. But, this story is actually  about losing your brand, and the implication of doing so.

 

Let’s start with some history. The British motor industry was once one of the  biggest in the world (technically, it still is, but cars are now made for  companies whose headquarters are elsewhere). Companies such as Austin, Morris,  Triumph, Rover, and Jaguar sold cars in their millions around the world.  Collectively, these companies not only brought innovative products to the mass  market (the first hatchback and the Mini, for example) but their work also led  to the growth of other companies around the world: the BMW Dixi, a local variant  of the Austin Seven, was the first serious entry by BMW into volume  manufacturing.

 

As the car market became increasingly globalised, it became harder and harder  for these industrial titans to compete. This led to a series of mergers between  them. In 1968, the British Leyland Motor Corporation was created out of a  mega-merger between two car groups. One was profitable and the other was on its  knees; the Government stepped in and shunted the two together in an attempt to  save both.

 

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A useful history of branding (or the lack of it) within the British auto industry. It is indeed a cautionary tale.

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